Illinois Public Media News

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - December 04, 2011

Champaign Co. Nursing Homes Get Low Marks

(With additional reporting by Pam G. Dempsey/CU-CitizenAccess and former University of Illinois journalism student Sabrina Santucci)

An elderly man with Alzheimer's leaves a local nursing home without staff noticing and is found wandering into traffic on Mattis Ave in Champaign.-

A patient in a nursing home in Champaign is left unattended on a bed pan for hours until its shape cuts into her flesh.- In another home a patient who should be only on soft foods is given orange slices that ultimately caused his choking death a few hours later.

These are just a few of the numerous examples of lack of care found in area-wide nursing homes.-Indeed, many nursing homes are across Central Illinois have been cited repeatedly over the past five years for safety violations that put residents at risk for untreated pressure sores, bladder infections, serious medication errors and broken bones.

In some severe cases, residents have been rushed to hospitals or even died from lack of proper care.

Inadequate staffing issues and delayed public health insurance payments are major concerns among nursing home care facilities, but they shouldn't be an excuse for poor care, said Tami Wacker, operations manager and regional ombudsman for the East Central Illinois Area Agency on Aging.

"When someone says, 'I accept you, I will admit you, I can take care of you,' they have made a promise and you need to fulfill that," she said.

A close review by CU-CitizenAccess.org of hundreds of federal and state inspection reports on 93 Central Illinois nursing homes revealed:

Fifty percent of nursing home beds that are Medicare or Medicaid certified are located in facilities rated below average by the federal regulatory site Medicare.gov.

In Champaign County, four out of the seven nursing homes - which have 75 percent of nursing home beds that are available to Medicare or Medicaid recipients - are rated below average.

Central Illinois nursing homes have paid more than $1 million in fines and penalties for violations between 2006 and 2010.

State inspectors have found that low staffing levels and inadequate training have contributed to resident injuries and deaths at some nursing homes in Central Illinois.

Nursing home administrators across Central Illinois and health care advocates alike acknowledge that rating systems, such as The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid on Medicare.gov, do have problems. And nursing home owners say that late Medicaid reimbursements from the state are increasing their woes.

"But it does give a very good base." Wacker said.

Wacker's office acts as an advocate for nursing home residents across counties in Central Illinois. A private, non-profit group, it handles about 600 complaints each year from across nearly 200 long-term care homes and they report problems to the state when serious health care issues arise.

On the regulatory front, long-term care facilities are certified through the federal agency for receiving Medicaid and Medicare reimbursements, but they are licensed through the Illinois Department of Health.

The health department does inspections for the federal agency during their own mandatory yearly survey. If complaints are made at a long-term care facility the department is required by federal regulations to investigate the complaint.

If facilities are funded by Medicare and Medicaid and do not meet their requirements during an inspection, then they can be decertified and lose their funding. For example, Helia Healthcare of Urbana closed in 2009 after regulators pulled its certificate for reimbursements because of poor patient care.

By law facilities have to report any problems with patient care to the Illinois Department of Public Health and then the department investigates. The state looks for a pattern; if the same type of serious violation continues to occur then processes to revoke the facility's license can begin.

"Each home is very different. What you are see in one facility may not correlate to another, direct comparisons are not possible it's like comparing apples to oranges," said Melaney Arnold, spokeswoman for the state public health department.

"Having them come in and write that deficiency will show that facility, you've got to change your way because this level of care is not acceptable," Wacker said. "And if it's not acceptable for this resident, it's not acceptable for anybody else, currently or in the future, and we want to get that changed immediately."

Nursing Homes Criticize Rating System

Greg Wilson, vice president of quality management for Petersen Health Care, sharply critizes the ratings. Petersen Health Care operates dozens of for-profit nursing homes across the state and the reports reviewed for nine of its facilities in Central Illinois rated those homes below average.

Wilson wrote in an email, "The system is based on a very subjective state survey process that is inconsistently applied across the country, faulty staffing statistics, and quality measures that are affected by too many factors to be descriptive of any resident's actual clinical condition or needs."

He wrote the system "makes no accommodation for the wide disparity between Medicaid reimbursement rates paid throughout the country of which Illinois is historically ranked at the very bottom. The rating has very little or no bearing on the quality of care being provided at any nursing home in the country."

President and chief executive officer Deb Reardanz of the nursing home Clark-Lindsey Village in Urbana said that while the rating system is good for consumers, "it doesn't always capture the full picture."

Clark-Lindsay is rated at average with its current rating of three out of five stars.

"I do not believe that tells the full story," she said. "We are above average and we work hard to be a leader in the field, not just in the area, but throughout the state."

She said the home received too low a rating.

"We're not satisfied with the (rating)," she said.

Inspections and Fines

Whether the ratings are warranted, the deficiencies reported can be shocking.

In one incident in May 2009, a crying and disoriented a man stumbled into the busy lanes of South Mattis Avenue in Champaign during rush hour traffic. Police reports say a passerby called to report the man in the street. The man, a patient at Helia Healthcare of Champaign, had left the nursing home and into the four-lane road without anyone noticing.

According to state quarterly reports the passerby stated, "What scared me so bad was that no one from the nursing home knew he was there!"

The man, who had been admitted to Helia Healthcare of Champaign the month before, suffered from Alzheimer's disease. Reports said he wandered out of a door left open with its alarm off while the nursing home was doing maintenance.

But it wasn't the last time a resident had left the facility without the staff's knowledge.

In January 2010, a 53-year-old man with Parkinson's disease and a history of mental disorders was able to leave the facility without anyone noticing. He had been admitted to the nursing home after he "had fallen at home and was found living in unsanitary conditions."

He later told inspectors that he walked out the front door that morning to get a cup of coffee at a local restaurant and rode the bus before he was found later walking along Mattis Avenue, according to a state report. By his estimate, he was gone from the facility for about three hours before staff noticed.

Araceli Henson, administrator, at the Helia Healthcare in Champaign canceled two scheduled interviews for comment.

Choking Death

In summer of 2009, Champaign-Urbana Regional Rehab Center, formerly known as Carle Arbours, was fined $10,000 after a patient choked on mandarin orange slices, ultimately causing his death the next day.

The resident was required to have a pureed diet, and was found with no pulse and solid food protruding from his mouth by a certified nursing assistant, according to a report. It took 24 minutes from the time the staff found the man unresponsive till the time someone called 911.

The home's director of nursing later told investigators that orientation for new employees did not include training for the Heimlich maneuver, CPR, how to respond to resident emergencies or how to use the telephone system in an emergency, according to the report.

One certified nursing assistant told inspectors: "It was a lot of back and forth running around. Afterwards one of the other CNAs asked me why I didn't use the phone in the dining room to call for help or page someone. I didn't even know to use them for emergencies. I should have been told to do that in orientation but they never told me that. It would have saved a lot of time."

An emergency room doctor who treated the man told the inspectors: "I would expect anyone in a medical situation to be informed of the basic life support systems and know how to rapidly access ... (emergency medical systems)."

Administrators at the home did not respond to numerous attempts to reach them for comment.

Champaign County Nursing Home

In another incident in March of this year, a Champaign County Nursing Home resident was left on a bedpan for six hours, which resulted in a pressure sore. The sore - shaped like a bedpan - became infected and turned into a blood infection that required hospitalization and medication.

An employee told investigators, "I looked at her backside and it was split open. When I saw it I said, 'Oh my God' because I saw pink meat. I went and got the nurse."

The nursing home was fined $25,000 in April for the incident.

Champaign County Nursing Home paid nearly $80,000 for violations between 2006 and 2010. In October, Chuck Schuette took over as its administrator and inherited all of its problems.

"I do know that it's really difficult trying to be in compliance with all of these issues," he said. "I'm not saying they don't need to be there, but you have to have a really dedicated work force, a highly-trained workforce and they just have to stay on top of it all the time. "

He added, "And sometimes things happen and you hate it when it does and you have to correct it."

The county nursing home also has been under intense financial pressure because of late Medicaid payments from the state.

But for Schuette, like others, money isn't the main concern.

"If the resident isn't number one in your facility, then how can you expect it to be successful?" said Chris Kasper, administrator of Country Health & Rehab in Gifford. "This is their home and this is who we care for. Regardless of public health ratings and all the inspections, all that aside, it really just comes down to the morals and ethics, you know, what can you do? It's not always about your bottom line."

Map: Champaign County Nursing Homes - 40 Percent Are Below Average:

 

Categories: Government, Health, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - December 04, 2011

CUMTD Launches Competition for Software Developers

The Champaign Urbana Mass Transit District is trying to expand the use of technology for its riders.

That is why it has launched a competition for software developers to come up with applications that work on smart phones, desktops, and other devices. Karl Gnadt, who is the CUMTD's director market development, said more people are using this sort of technology to look up information about bus departures and arrivals.

"More and more are telling us that they don't use our schedule books, that they use the real time information," Gnadt said. "Typically, they'll get that on a mobile device. Though, often times they will use a computer as well."

The top three software developers will get a cash prize of $1000, $600, and $200, but Gnadt said all of the applications submitted will be in circulation on smart phones, desktops, and other devices.

"We think that the top three that the judges select are probably going to be the best of the bunch," he said. "So, I would think that those three would be the most popular and the most used."

Gnadt said there are currently about a dozen applications in circulation for CUMTD riders.

The deadline for the competition is Feb. 20.

Categories: Technology, Transportation

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - December 03, 2011

Lawmakers Urge UI Board of Trustees to Keep Police Training Institute

Lawmakers from Central Illinois urged the University of Illinois' Board of Trustees on Friday to keep the police training institute open on the Urbana campus.

Last fall, a faculty panel suggested closing the institute to save $900,000 annually. It has been around for more than 55 years.

Urbana Mayor Laurel Prussing is part of the state's Law Enforcement Training and Standards Board, which has been looking to find sustainable funding for the U of I's Police Training Institute. She said the program should stay open.

"We understand the quality, and we don't want a short-term financial difficulty to halt a program that people really depend on and have really depended on as a standard for excellence in Illinois," Prussing said.

State Rep. Chapin Rose (R-Mahomet) said he and other legislatures have put together a proposal to raise a fee on criminal convictions to help maintain the program.

"My goal is to not just have PTI remain in Champaign County," Rose said. "My goal is to have the best PTI in the world in Champaign County."

If the Police Training Institute does close, University of Illinois Police Chief Barbara O'Connor has said it would make more sense to have such a facility in a central location like Springfield rather than Macomb.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - December 02, 2011

Governor Expected to Sign Measure Restoring Prairie Center Detox

It's now up to Governor Pat Quinn to restore nearly $30-million to substance abuse treatment programs around the state.

Funds approved by the Senate this week include $450-thousand for Urbana-based Prairie Center Health Systems. CEO Bruce Suardini says the facility has been without that money since July, when it cut both the detox program and staff.

Provided the governor signs the measure, Suardini says it would take about a month after that before Prairie Center would get a revised contract. And when that money is restored, he says it will take some time to ramp up staff that was laid off when the fiscal year started.

"It's not a light switch. Just because the governor passes this, then a contract has to come to you, then it's specific as to how you can spend it," Suardini said. "Then you have to hire and train a staff to get it all back up and going, and try to expend the money before it all runs out by June. So, that's why I'm saying it's so schizophrenic is that it really puts the client in a bad situation."

The bill now before the governor would include nearly $17-million for addiction treatment services, and $7-point-6 million for related treatment for Medicaid patients. Suardini says Quinn is expected to sign the measure.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - December 02, 2011

Judge: Blagojevich Sentencing to Take 2 Days

A federal judge says it will take two days to sentence ousted Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich.

U.S. District Judge James Zagel says he expects Blagojevich's sentencing on 18 corruption-related counts to last through Tuesday and Wednesday.

Zagel told Blagojevich's attorneys Friday that they won't have to "cram everything in'' on Tuesday. Even if both sides finish their arguments in one day, Zagel says he'll likely have questions for them.

Prosecutors have asked Zagel to sentence Blagojevich to 15 to 20 years in prison. Attorneys for the 54-year-old impeached governor say a more reasonable sentence is between 3 1/2 years and more than 4 years. Blagojevich's attorneys also have presented the judge with reasons to issue a lesser sentence.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - December 02, 2011

UI Board of Trustees Approves Assembly Hall Contract

The University of Illinois' Board of Trustees has unanimously approved a contract with a Chicago-based architectural firm to draft renovation plans on the Urbana campus' Assembly Hall.

The initial phase of project costs more than two million dollars. During Friday's trustees meeting in Springfield, U of I Athletic Director Mike Thomas couldn't lay out a firm timeline for when construction would begin.

"Well, I think it's difficult to say on the construction and final end," Thomas said. "It's really contingent starting today the opportunity to get the architects and engineers involved, knowing that they'll provide us with the documents to go out and sell the project, and then as soon as we raise the money and have a funding model in place, then we can put a hole in the ground, but I would say we could start the renovation project."

One renovation that's been talked about is air conditioning. The Assembly Hall, which was built in the 1960s, isn't used that often during the summer since it lacks air conditioning.

Categories: Education, Sports

AP - Illinois Public Media News - December 02, 2011

Blagojevich Judge Explains Trial Decisions

Federal Judge James Zagel on Friday denied Rod Blagojevich's last ditch efforts to get his convictions thrown out. In what's become his trademark monotone voice that makes him sound perpetually bored, Zagel spent almost an hour explaining his decisions during the governor's two trials.

Blagojevich's defense attorneys had asked Zagel to throw out the convictions saying the judge was unfair to them and that he forced the governor to testify.

Zagel said Blagojevich was one vote away from being convicted on very serious charges in the first trial, and the hold out juror may have held an honest but mistaken view of political dealing. Zagel said based on that, Blagojevich made the decision to testify because he knew he had to explain disturbing passages on tapes where he sounded like an angry person with an obsessive concern for his personal welfare above all else. And Zagel noted that because of the testimony, several jurors found Blagojevich to be a likable person.

Zagel also said he used a neutral tone when admonishing Blagojevich who often gave long answers that included lots of irrelevent facts about U.S. history. Blagojevich spent seven days on the stand testifying.

Zagel noted that he did raise his voice once when Blagojevich started talking about his cousin who had died at Children's Memorial Hospital. Zagel said he only raised his voice because he had already warned Blagojevich not to discuss that issue. Blagojevich brought up his cousin, ostensibly to explain that he had a long and close relationship with Children's Memorial Hospital and would never try to extort them for campaign contributions, as he was accused of doing. At Friday's hearing, Zagel pointed out that it would be strange for Blagojevich to feel inclined toward the hospital that failed to save the life of his cousin. Zagel said he though Blagojevich was just trying to win the sympathy of the jury.

Blagojevich's sentencing hearing will start Tuesday. Attorneys for both sides said they expected the hearing to wrap up in one day, but Zagel said he's not going to hand down his decision before Wednesday.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - December 02, 2011

U of Illinois Reviewing Sex Abuse Policies

The University of Illinois is responding to allegations of sexual misconduct at other schools by reviewing its own policies.

The scandals and Penn State and Syracuse got the attention of Illinois President Michael Hogan.

"I think it's alarming to all of us and I'm no different, it's shocking," Hogan said. "Particularly when it involves a university, it's very, very shocking. We're not above it. The University of Illinois, we have 80 thousand students. You throw in the faculty and the staff, it's a big city almost. It's a medium sized city. So we're not immune to things going wrong, people making mistakes."

Hogan has ordered staff to go through the rules regarding sexual abuse to see if anything should be changed.

"We have a very, very good record on these things on all three of our campuses, but you can never be too sure or too safe," he said. "So it's just an occasion and opportunity for us to review our current policies."

Hogan said he wants to make it clear that anyone who witnesses inappropriate conduct is required to report it. He added that job protection would be given to the witness. Hogan said all university employees will undergo training to educate them on sexual harassment.

The policies will also cover non-university activities that use school facilities, including youth sports camps.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - December 02, 2011

Committee Continuing Investigation of Jackson Jr.

The U.S. House ethics committee announced on Friday that it will continue its investigation of Congressman Jesse Jackson, Jr. The panel also released hundreds of pages of documents from the inquiry.

The ethics committee stressed in a statement that just because it's keeping the investigation open "does not itself indicate that any violation has occurred."

The inquiry centers on whether Jackson was involved in pay-to-play offers, or used taxpayer resources, when the Chicago Democrat tried to win a U.S. Senate appointment from then-Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich.

According to testimony at Blagojevich's two corruption trials, supporters of Jackson offered the governor millions in campaign contributions if he appointed Jackson to the Senate.

The committee on Friday released more than 300 pages, including notes from interviews with the congressman, his staff and his brother. At the bottom of the stack was a copy of talking points prepared by Jackson's staff, apparently intended to help comedian Bill Cosby call Blagojevich to urge Jackson's appointment. The documents do not mention whether Cosby ever made the call.

The documents also include a brief written by Jackson's lawyers that said he "acted honorably at all times" and was never aware of any pay-to-play offers. The lawyers argued that any government resources used in his non-"traditional" campaign for the Senate appointment were "permissible" under exceptions in the House rules.

In a statement, Jackson said, "For the first time in three years my side of the story will be made public and for that I am grateful."

Jackson faces a primary election challenge in March from former U.S. Rep. Debbie Halvorson, who's criticized him for "ethical distractions."

The ethics committee's investigation had long been stalled at the request of the U.S. Justice Department. The inquiry resumed after Blagojevich's conviction this summer, including on charges that he attempted to profit from his power to appoint a U.S. senator.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - December 01, 2011

State Retailers Group Back “E-Fairness” Bill

An Illinois retailers group is endorsing bills in Congress that could settle the battle over sales taxes between online sellers and brick-and-mortar stores.

Illinois Retail Merchants Association President David Vite said his group welcomes both versions of the Marketplace Fairness Act, saying they would create uniform nationwide definitions and rules for state sales taxes --- making it easier for online retailers to collect those taxes from buyers in every state. For instance, he said states would have to agree on how they categorize items for tax purposes.

"What is clothing and what is an accessory?" Vite said. "So if clothing is taxed as a tie --- an accessory, or is it part of clothing? If you're selling food, are the definitions the same? That has to occur, and there has to be some very simple remittance requirements --- a single form and those kind of things. And if the state certifies that they do that, they would be eligible to participate."

Stephanie Sack owns the Viva La Femme shops in Chicago, which sell clothes to plus-size women. Speaking at a news conference in support of the bills, Sack said online sellers have an unfair advantage, because they generally don't collect state sales taxes like she does at her stores.

"The advantage that the Internet has - no matter what, where, when, or who - is a government sanctioned 10 percent markdown," Sack said.

Amazon.com has come out in favor of the Marketplace Fairness Act, while some other big online sellers have stayed away. Overstock.com said it supports another bill, called the Equity in Sales Tax Collection Act.

Vite said that bill is similar to the Marketplace Fairness Act, but he said the bill favored by Overstock provides a "small business exemption" for annual sales of up to $30-million --- a level he said is too high.

U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin (Ill.) is co-sponsoring the Marketplace Fairness Act in the Senate, while U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. (D-Ill.) is co-sponsoring it in the U.S. House of Representatives.


Page 545 of 850 pages ‹ First  < 543 544 545 546 547 >  Last ›