Illinois Public Media News

AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 08, 2011

Ill. Congressmen Offer Prayers After Shooting Attack on Rep. Giffords

Illinois congressmen are offering sympathy and prayers after the shooting attack on Rep. Gabrielle Giffords of Arizona.

Congressmen Jesse Jackson Jr., Mike Quigley and Jan Schakowsky say the attack is horrific and they're offering condolences.

At least two people were killed and several others wounded Saturday, as Giffords met with constituents in Tucson. Hospital officials say Giffords' outlook was 'optimistic.'

A Jackson spokesman says the congressman's events are frequently staffed by security personnel, but it's too early to tell if changes need to be made.

A Quigley spokeswoman says security for the congressman hasn't been addressed yet in light of the attack.

Police say the shooter was in custody.

(Photo courtesy of the U.S. House of Representatives)


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - January 07, 2011

State Legislator Serving for a Day May Vote On Income Tax Hike

Shane Cultra's longtime aide, Russell Geisler, will be taking over his boss' Illinois House seat for just one day this Sunday --- the day that Democrats could bring their budget measure to a vote.

Under the plan outlined by Senate President John Cullerton on Thursday night, Illinois' three percent income tax would jump to a rate of five and a quarter. For taxpayers that is a 75 percent increase. After about four years, the rate will drop, making it a solid 25 percent hike.

Champaign Republicans have raised concerns about Geisler's temporary appointment to the General Assembly, saying he should not be allowed to vote during his day in office.

Cultra said he believes Geisler will vote for the legislation to raise the state's income tax, just as he would. The measure also includes an increase in the corporate income tax that Cultra said would make it the highest in the country. The Onarga Republican said the state needs to cut spending before it considers raising taxes.

"This is a huge, huge tax increase," Cultra said. "It's going to hurt people. I think you have to bite the bullet, and start cutting programs back. You're just going to have to start cutting everything."

Cultra could have another chance to vote on the income tax proposal if it comes to the Illinois Senate --- a body he will join next week. But State Senator Mike Frerichs (D-Champaign) said he is not sure if the proposal will make it that far.

Frerichs would not commit to supporting the take hike, which he said he still needs to review. However, he did say along with spending cuts, the state needs to find new revenue to address a deficit that could hit $15-billion this year.

"There's a general agreement in our caucus that we don't want to see devastating cuts to our universities, to our education system, to our pension contributions," Frerichs said. "In order to make those payments, we need to find revenue so that we can pay our bills."

Democrats are hurrying to get the legislation passed before Wednesday when the lame duck session ends. Democrats will still hold the majority in both chambers when lawmakers are sworn in on Jan. 12, though there will be more Republican in the General Assembly.

Categories: Economics, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 07, 2011

Ill. Legislators Pause Before Big Tax Push

Illinois legislators are taking a break before Democrats push forward on a major income tax increase.

House leaders will try to round up support for the 75 percent increase before returning to Springfield on Sunday.

After the House adjourned today, Rep. Frank Mautino said the tax plan doesn't have enough support to pass right now. But the Spring Valley Democrat predicts it will pass in the end.

There's little doubt it will succeed in the Senate, which resumes work on Monday. That's when Gov. Pat Quinn and other statewide officials are sworn in for a new term.

Several Republican lawmakers criticized the idea of raising taxes so dramatically, even if most of the increase would expire after four years. They say it would drive jobs out of Illinois.

Categories: Economics, Government, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - January 07, 2011

Local Lawmakers Takes Sides on Illinois Death Penalty Repeal

State Senator Mike Frerichs said he expects to vote to repeal the Illinois death penalty --- if the measure comes up when the Illinois Senate meets on Monday.

The repeal bill narrowly passed the Illinois House on Thursday, and Frerichs said he thinks other lawmakers will join him in supporting it. The Champaign Democrat says the important point to him is that the death penalty has been handed out to too many people who were found to have been wrongly convicted.

"I think the penalty has (been) shown to have grave errors over the last few decades here in our state," Frerichs said. "I think that's why a lot of people are probably supportive of the appeal."

But Onarga Republican Shane Cultra said he still believes the death penalty is a necessary deterrent to violent crime --- and that the introduction of DNA evidence has done a lot to prevent wrongful convictions.

"I think there's enough safeguards in place," Cultra said. "Certainly there's more that we can do --- they haven't fully implemented all the things that were supposed to be done, but they've done enough of them. And plus some of these crimes are so heinous, that I just feel that life imprisonment just isn't enough."

Cultra voted against repealing the death penalty in the Illinois House, and he may get a chance to vote on it again, if the Senate takes up the bill in the final days of the veto session next week. Cultra will be sworn in as a State Senator on Sunday, taking the place of Treasurer-elect Dan Rutherford.

There have been no executions in Illinois since former governor George Ryan declared a moratorium ten years ago. While maintaining the moratorium, Governor Pat Quinn has said he supports the death penalty for the most serious crimes.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - January 07, 2011

U of I Professor Says Holdup Over Federal Judgeships Isn’t Surprising

US Senator Dick Durbin has re-submitted three names for federal judgeships from Illinois' Central District.

4th District Appellate Court Justice Sue Myerscough, Peoria Judge James Shadid, and Rock Island Prosecutor Sara Darrow were all nominated by President Obama last year. But they didn't get an up or down vote prior to November's elections, so those 3, along 39 others will go back before the Senate Judiciary Committee. University of Illinois Political Science Professor Brian Gaines says it's not surprising, since both parties have 'played hardball' with judicial nominations in recent years.

"I think both parties are finger-pointing and they're both right. " he said. "Both parties have decided in the past they'd block even the non-controversial judges in an effort to get the other side to withdraw nominations of more controversial figures. That's certainly the case of at least two of three, and maybe all three of these. They're not particularly controversial figures."

Gaines says Judge Shadid may have the most bipartisan support and be the least controversial, noting that he has the backing of Peoria Congressman Aaron Schock. Gaines says the slowdown when filling federal judgeships is nothing new, noting the same the same thing happened under President George W. Bush, when Democrats filibustered some Bush nominees that they felt were too conservative. Despite political battles, Gaines says the nominations are likely to speed up and address what Durbin calls a 'judicial emergency' in the 112th Congress.

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 07, 2011

Ex-Governor Ryan Visited Ill Wife This Week

Former Illinois Gov. George Ryan was temporarily let out of prison to visit his gravely ill wife on Wednesday, according to a new government court filing.

Prosecutors said in the Friday morning filing that the Federal Bureau of Prisons granted Ryan's request to visit his wife, Lura Lynn Ryan, who's said to be dying of cancer at a Kankakee hospital. Ryan visited with her for about two hours on Wednesday night, according to the filing.

The filing by the U.S. Attorney's Office in Chicago is the first time the visit had been made public. Ryan's attorneys this week made an appeal to the Bureau of Prisons to allow for his temporary release in order to see his wife of 55 years, who they say may only have weeks to live. They also made a second appeal to a federal judge for his release, based in part on the gravity of his wife's condition.

But in Friday's court papers, federal prosecutors argue that Ryan should not be released from prison based on his wife's illness, since he'd already been granted a temporary release to see her. "A two-hour visit obviously is much less time than Ryan wishes to have with his gravely ill wife," prosecutors wrote, but they maintained that Ryan doesn't deserve "special treatment" by the court simply because his wife is ill.

Lura Lynn Ryan was admitted to the hospital Wednesday after apparent complications from chemotherapy. According to the court motion, the 76-year-old Lura Lynn Ryan has been diagnosed with an incurable cancer of the lungs, back, pelvis, ribs and liver.

Last month, the federal judge overseeing Ryan's case denied an appeal from his lawyers, saying Ryan's six and a half year sentence for receiving kickbacks while in office, "exacted a stiff penalty not only for himself, but also his family."

(Photo courtesy of the Kankakee Public Library)

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 07, 2011

Illinois Senate Leader: Tax Deal Reached

Top Illinois Democrats have agreed to push a plan that would temporarily boost income taxes by 75 percent and double cigarette taxes, Senate President John Cullerton said Thursday.

Illinois' personal income tax rate, now 3 percent, would climb to 5.25 percent for four years under the plan Cullerton outlined. After that, it would drop to 3.75 percent.

That means someone who now owes $1,000 in state income taxes would owe $1,750 at the new rate, then $1,250 after four years.

The permanent portion would be used several ways. Some would be devoted to schools and some to repaying an $8.5 billion loan that would be used to pay overdue bills, Cullerton said.

Another chunk would go to property tax relief in the form of annual $325 checks, he said. The checks would replace the property tax exemption that homeowners can now claim on their income taxes.

Cullerton said House Speaker Michael Madigan and Gov. Pat Quinn fully support the tax proposal, although Quinn once promised to veto any increase of that size.

Madigan's spokesman said he couldn't discuss the speaker's position. The Senate has approved tax increases in the past, so the biggest question about this proposal is whether Madigan can find enough votes to get it through the House.

The governor's office put out a statement that stopped short of saying the three leaders had reached a final agreement. Rank-and-file legislators said Quinn described the tax plan to them earlier in the day and portrayed it as a deal among all three of the powerful Democrats.

Democrats say they have no choice but to raise taxes as one part of a solution to Illinois' massive budget crisis. The state deficit could reach $15 billion in the coming year. The government is borrowing money to cover some obligations, letting bills go unpaid for months and cutting corners everywhere from state prisons to state parks.

"We are in desperate need," Cullerton said at a news conference in his office.

Cullerton said the higher taxes would generate about $7.5 billion a year during the four years they're at their highest.

The tax on cigarettes, now 98 cents a pack, would jump to $1.98, Cullerton said. The money would be earmarked for education.

Quinn, Cullerton and Madigan want to pass something before the current General Assembly formally ends Jan. 12. After that, they lose some of their Democratic majority as well as outgoing legislators who might be persuaded to support a tax increase as they leave office.

Madigan has repeatedly said he doubts that a tax increase could pass in the House without Republican support. But Republican leaders have not been included in tax and budget negotiations, and there was no indication Thursday that they were prepared to cooperate with the Democrats.

"If they think this is a solution, they should go ahead and put their own votes on it," said Senate Minority Leader Christine Radogno, R-Lemont.

Cullerton emphasized that taxes would be just one part of the solution.

Quinn and the Legislature already have cut spending significantly. They've also reduced pension benefits for future state employees and passed a plan to help limit the cost of providing health care to the poor.

Cullerton said there also will be a moratorium on new programs and spending growth would be held to 1 percent a year.

"We are not doing a short-term fix," he said.

The tax proposal puts Quinn in an awkward position. It would boost the tax rate by 2.25 percentage points, but the governor promised last year to veto any increase above 1 percentage point.

Last summer, a Quinn aide suggested taxes might have to be raised by 2 points. Quinn quickly disavowed the comments and said he opposed anything beyond his proposed hike of 1 percentage point.

"I'm going to veto anything that isn't my plan," Quinn said at the time.

Quinn's office didn't comment Thursday on the conflict between the tax plan and his campaign promise.

Radogno said it would be "dishonest" for Quinn to approve it after promising a veto.

"To me, that's kind of a bait and switch," she said.

Categories: Economics, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 06, 2011

Coroner: Danville Girls Died of Carbon Monoxide

The Vermilion County coroner says two young girls who died in a house fire in Danville were killed by carbon monoxide poisoning.

Coroner Peggy Johnson said Thursday that preliminary results of autopsies conducted on 5-year-old Deziray Mott and 4-year-old Seiona Haywood showed that they had inhaled large amounts of smoke and soot from the fire in their home.

The house caught fire early Wednesday morning. Two adults and two young boys escaped the blaze.

Fire investigators have said they believe the fire was started by children playing with a lighter.

Categories: Community

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - January 06, 2011

Decatur Electronics Moving Manufacturing Operation Out of State

A company in Decatur that produces police radar and traffic enforcement equipment for police agencies in the United States and in other countries is moving its manufacturing division to Arizona and California.

Decatur Electronics will relocate the department to a larger 50-thousand square foot facility near Phoenix Sky Harbor Airport, and it will also set up an assembly line in San Diego. Forty-three workers would be affected as a result of the move, and 10 of those employees are customer service representatives who will relocate to Arizona.

Tim Roberts, the company's customer service manager, said the sluggish economy has meant that fewer law enforcement agencies are buying new equipment, and instead ordering upgrades or repairs. He said the motivation behind the move is part of an effort to strengthen business

"We're going to a much bigger facility that will allow us to expand our business in the international market as well," Roberts said. "We do service people all over the world, and we need to continue that. So, this will allow us to serve those customers better."

Roberts said it is unclear how many jobs will ultimately be eliminated. He said the company will provide interview training and resume writing workshops to help employees find new work if they lose their jobs.

"We appreciate the functionality and the people who have been here during this time," he said. "We're going to do everything we can to make sure they get job placements and/or transition smoothly."

Relocating the company's manufacturing base is expected to take about three months. The company, which is owned by U.K.-based Bowmer and Kirkland, says the move will not disrupt services or the delivery of products.

Categories: Business, Economics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 06, 2011

Obama Chooses Daley as Chief of Staff

President Barack Obama named veteran political manager William Daley to be his new chief of staff Thursday, selecting a centrist with Wall Street ties to help navigate a newly divided Congress and a looming re-election.

"Few Americans can boast the breadth of experience that Bill brings to this job," Obama told reporters in the East Room as Daley, 62, stood at his side.

"But most of all, I know Bill to be somebody who cares deeply about this country, believes in its promise, and considers no calling higher and more important than serving the American people," the president said.

The appointment represented the most significant move in a far-reaching and ongoing staff shakeup that included the departure of Obama's press secretary and several key deputies and economic advisers. It came the day after Republicans officially assumed control of the House and increased their numbers in the Senate.

Daley, who served as commerce secretary for President Bill Clinton, offers criteria Obama wants for the new environment in Washington: an outsider's perspective, credibility with the business community, familiarity with the ways of the Cabinet and experience in navigating divided government.

"I'm convinced that he'll help us in our mission of growing our economy and moving America forward," Obama said.

Daley made a pledge to the president: "This team will not let you down - nor the nation."

Daley replaces Pete Rouse, the interim chief of the last three months and a behind-the-scenes Obama adviser who did not want the position permanently and recommended Daley for it. Rouse, who received warm praise from Obama and sustained applause from staffers watching in the East Room, will remain as a counselor to the president, an elevated position from his former job as senior adviser.

Daley was expected to start as chief of staff within the next couple of weeks. His brother, Richard Daley, is the mayor of Chicago, the post that Obama's first chief of staff, Rahm Emanuel, left his job in October to seek. The Daley brothers are sons of Richard J. Daley, who was Chicago's mayor from 1955 to his death in 1976.

Although Chicago is also Obama's hometown, the president has not had a close relationship with his new chief of staff. But Obama alluded to the Daley political legacy, joking that he "has a smidgen of awareness of how our system of government and politics works. You might say it is a genetic trait."

Daley will assume one of the most important and influential jobs in American government as an adviser and gatekeeper to Obama. He will be thrust into the heart of national politics just as Obama adapts to a new reality in Washington, with Republicans working to gut his signature health care law and pushing for major cuts in spending.

Although Daley has not sought elective office himself, he has long been immersed in politics.

He helped Clinton pass the North American Free Trade Agreement before joining his Cabinet. Later, he ran Al Gore's 2000 presidential campaign and the historic recount effort that ended with Gore conceding the race to George W. Bush.

When Obama launched his presidential campaign, the Daley family put aside its deep connections to Bill and Hillary Rodham Clinton and endorsed the young Illinois senator. Until then, Obama and the Daleys had largely operated separately in Illinois politics - not helping each other much but not attacking each other, either. After Obama's victory, Daley helped oversee the presidential transition.

Daley, a lawyer and banker, now serves as Midwest chairman of JPMorgan Chase. His appointment could raise questions about the White House's closeness with Wall Street just as Obama is eager to enforce reforms that benefit the little guy.

Liberal groups reacted negatively to the announcement, with MoveOn.org calling it "troubling" because of Daley's "close ties to the big banks and big business." By contrast, the choice won praise from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, which Obama has recently begun to woo after clashes with business groups. The chamber called Daley "a man of stature and extraordinary experience in government, business, trade negotiations and global affairs."

The reactions underscored Obama's determination to play to the middle as he ramps up for his re-election fight in 2012, even if it means alienating allies on the left.

Daley laid out his political ideology last year upon joining the board of Third Way, a moderate Democratic think tank.

"We must acknowledge that the left's agenda has not won the support of a majority of Americans - and, based on that recognition, we must steer a more moderate course," he said at the time.

Obama is ushering in changes across his senior leadership - the result of internal staff fatigue, a need to shift energy and people to Obama's re-election campaign, and an adaptation to the fresh limits on Obama's power. Although many of the names of the players may not be familiar to the electorate, the collective personnel changes will influence not just Obama but the national agenda.

White House press secretary Robert Gibbs announced Wednesday he was resigning by early February, senior adviser David Axelrod will be leaving soon, and both of Obama's deputy chiefs of staff, Jim Messina and Mona Sutphen, are exiting soon, too. David Plouffe, a key member of Obama's inner circle as his former presidential campaign manager, will be joining the senior staff of the White House on Monday.

Daley emerged as a natural candidate for the chief of staff post, particularly after other internal candidates ended up in other positions. He is close to some of those in Obama's orbit, including Axelrod, Emanuel and senior presidential adviser Valerie Jarrett.

Categories: Government, Politics

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