Illinois Public Media News

AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 07, 2010

Urbana Congressman Vents Frustration Over Reconfigured FutureGen

Urbana Congressman Tim Johnson says he's 'more than upset' with the Obama administration for what he calls an absolute betrayal of what has been promised for FutureGen.

The Republican says the revamped agreement to make Mattoon a repository for underground storage of carbon emissions, rather than the home to a clean-coal burning plant, shows 'a lack of credibility' from colleagues who had support the original project the last few years. Johnson says he's hoping to set up a meeting with US Energy Secretary Steven Chu next week, with hopes he'll reconsider. "We don't know exactly what the cost is going to be, but it's definable enough that we can go ahead with the project as promised," said Johnson. "As a matter of fact, we just got a letter within the last day or two from I-EPA indicating that they were going full speed with the project. So this came as a complete suprise to us, and it came as a complete surprise to everybody in the delegation apparently with the exception of Senator (Dick) Durbin."

Johnson says the Illinois US Senator had plenty of time to take credit for FutureGen's original plan... but has now become someone he can't count on. The Congressman says Republican colleagues Mark Kirk and John Shimkus are also upset with the revamped plan. Meanwhile, the chairman of the consortium of energy companies supporting the FutureGen project said it was ready to go ahead with the revised plans. Steven Winberg of the FutureGen Alliance says they look forward to "moving the project to the new phase", and working with the Energy Department and officials in Coles County to better understand the new plan's "details and merits".


AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 06, 2010

Champaign School Support Staff Contract Headed for School Bd Vote

Union members have ratified a new three-year contract for nearly 500 support staff in the Champaign School District --- and the school board will take its vote Monday night.

The three-year contract was ratified by members of the Champaign Educational Support Professionals union Thursday night. Union President Mary Logsdon says many members weren't happy with the agreement. But she says it's the best that could be done, considering the economy and the state's fiscal crisis.

"I mean it's a hard time to negotiate right now", says Logdson. "I feel like what we were able to do, I'm pleased with. You always want more, but like I say, with the times the way they are, I felt like we did pretty well by our membership."

Logsdon declined to give firm details prior to the school board's vote. But she said there was at least one bright spot --- pay for teaching assistants.

"We were concerned about our teaching assistants, with their pay parity with other districts, and we were able to improve upon that", says Logdson.

The contract also covers custodians, food service worker, bus drivers and other non-teaching jobs in the Champaign Unit Four District. The old contract expired June 30th.

Categories: Education, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 06, 2010

Illinois Launches Its First Back-To-School Sales Tax Holiday

Illinois' back-to-school sales tax holiday started Friday Through August 15th, shoppers can buy clothing, shoes and school supplies --- priced up to $100 --- without having to pay the state's 5%sales tax.

Susan Hofer of the Illinois Department of Revenue says the chief reason for the tax holiday is to help families during a tight economy.

"Governor Quinn and the General Assembly felt that this year above all, we wanted to do what we could to give parents struggling financially a break on what they have to spend", says Hofer.

The sales tax holiday is also welcomed by retailers, many of which are promoting the temporary tax break in their advertising. But Mark Robyn of the Washington D-C based Tax Foundation says the savings to consumers are modest, in part because some merchants use the tax holidays to mask their own price increases. Robyn says retailers don't gain either, because shoppers just shift their buying to the tax holiday period, instead of buying more. He calls tax holidays a gimmick.

"If a state needs to offer a holiday from their sales tax", said Robyn during a news conference, "it may be a good indication that there are bigger problems with their sales tax."

Robyn's arguments are disputed by the Illinois Retail Merchants Association, which lobbied for the bill creating the sales tax holiday. The group's president, David Vite, says competition will push merchants to cut prices even more.

"I'm aware of some who are going to be having 15-20% additional-off sales", says Vite. "This 5% is the icing. It's the gravy on the very good meal. It's what makes this an important economic stimulus package. It's what makes a great economic package. And retailers are going to take advantage of it by increased sales, not by increased prices."

The Illinois Retail Merchants Association lobbied for the tax holiday. Illinois joins 16 other states with tax holidays, including Missouri and Iowa. Their tax holidays also started Friday, but only run for the weekend, while the Illinois tax holiday runs through August 15th.

Categories: Business, Government, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - August 05, 2010

Walldogs Paint Downtown Danville

Danville is going to look a little brighter by the end of the week. Artists from around the world are gathering in the city to paint a collection of murals on downtown buildings that capture the community's history from its famous natives to old businesses. Illinois Public Media's Sean Powers recently had a chance to get acquainted with the group of artists known simply as The Walldogs.

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Categories: Community

AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 05, 2010

Champaign County Clerk Says Nearly 150 Voters in 2008 Didn’t Live At Stated Address

Champaign County Clerk Mark Shelden is urging voters to act with integrity after discovering nearly 150 people in the county voted illegally in the fall 2008.

He says there is no good way of checking as to whether some of these voters moved within Champaign County and should have filled out a federal-only ballot, or if they left the county entirely. Shelden's office discovered more than 600 pieces of mail sent to voters in 2008 that were returned as undeliverable.

After some research, it was determined that 146 of them provided a different address when registering than the one they lived at on November 2nd. Shelden contends a lot of these people probably didn't think much about listing the wrong address - but adds that kind of thing could affect an outcome of a race.

"When one group of people plays by the rules and doesn't get to vote on the school sales tax referendum and another group of people doesn't play by the rules and gets to vote on things they shouldn't be able to vote on - that's wrong." said Shelden. "In our society, we know virtually everyone is a law breaker in some fashion... they jaywalk, or they speed a little bit... everyone's got their own level of what they consider a law that they're not willing to violate versus laws that they're willing to violate."

Champaign County's sales tax referendum passed last year. But the totals were close when the item failed in 2008. Shelden says while illegal votes probably aren't a high priority for law enforcement, he has turned information on those 146 residents over to the FBI.

Shelden has written about his office's research in his blog, linked to below.

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 05, 2010

Durbin: FutureGen a Go, But Without a Mattoon Power Plant

The FutureGen project has taken a completely new turn -- and the bottom line is that Mattoon will not be hosting a power plant.

Instead, Senator Dick Durbin says the Department of Energy's new plan for the project is to retrofit an existing coal-fired power plant in western Illinois with a process called oxy-combustion. That process is designed to reduce CO2 emissions from the plant - what DOES get emitted would be sent by a brand new pipeline to Mattoon, where it would be stored in the underground facility that was already proposed for that site.

Durbin says Mattoon will still host a major portion of the FutureGen project - just not a freestanding power plant.

"It really made no sense to say we're going to build a power plant to prove what's already being tested in three of four different commercial facilities. That happens when you wait six years," Durbin told reporters Thursday afternoon. "So we tried to pick a technology that had a future, for retrofitting power plants and creating a pipeline that would be of value."

Durbin says the change will reduce the price tag to $1.2 billion, some of it contributed by the alliance of power and coal companies in FutureGen. He says plant retrofitting and pipeline work could begin next spring - the underground pipeline would use existing easements, some of them already containing pipelines.

Senator Durbin also says instead of the plant, Mattoon site would hold a training facility for experts to retrofit many other coal-fired plants across the country over time. But he says funding for that facility has not yet been lined up.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 05, 2010

Anti-War Activist Ayers to Retire from UIC

Radical Vietnam War protester William Ayers is retiring after more than 20 years as an education professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Education Dean Vicki Chou says Ayers' retirement will become official later this month.

Ayers co-founded the Weather Underground, an anti-war group held responsible for a series of bombings, including nonfatal explosions at the Pentagon and U.S. Capitol.

Ayers' past became a political issue during the 2008 presidential campaign because President Barack Obama served with Ayers on the board of a Chicago charity. There's no evidence they were ever close friends.

Chou said Ayers' retirement had nothing to do the controversy surrounding him, adding he was a "good colleague'' and hundreds of students cherish they were taught by him.

A spokesman for the university said Thursday that Ayers would not be available for comment.

Categories: Education, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 05, 2010

Coal Company Promises Less Invasive Excavation Technique

A spokeswoman for an Indiana-based coal company says she wants to set some minds at ease as its officials evaluate land in Champaign and Vermilion Counties for a possible underground mine.

Suzanne Jaworowski with Terre Haute-based Sunrise Coal says the mining technique they would use if they open a coal mine on the Champaign-Vermilion county border would not damage farmland. She says the company plans to use a room-and-pillar approach, which leaves the surface area intact and sustains it by only removing a certain portion of the coal undernearth. Farmers in the affected area south of Homer have been concerned that Sunrise would use what's called 'longwall' mining. Jaworowski says that technique carries the potential for damaging the land by removing large portions of coal at once.

Jaworoski says Sunrise plans to pursue a permit for work that would not result in subsidence or ground sinking as a result of building the underground mine. She says the company will release more information on its plans in the next week.

Sunrise Coal operates a coal mine in Carlisle, Indiana. the company is a subsidiary of Hallador Energy.

On Tuesday night... Champaign County Board members tabled discussion on zoning regulations for the mine. Board members say they first want to research how other counties have handled zoning for coal mines.

Categories: Business, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 04, 2010

Tech Changes Coming to the U of I

The University of Illinois plans to revamp its communication services for faculty and staff members.

Services like e-mail, phone, and instant messaging are offered through different providers, but in about two years, the U of I plans to consolidate those services through the computer company, Microsoft. This is expected to save about $3 million each year. Charley Kline is the Information Technology Architect for Campus Information Technologies and Educational Services (CITES), which offers technical services at the U of I. While the plan is being sold as a cost-saving measure, Kline said that it is also a sign that times are changing.

"When you think about the phone system that we use, it's basically 1960s, 1970s technology," he said. "It hasn't changed much in about 50 years."

The new telephone service will made available through Microsoft and carried on a computer program. People who are not ready to make the switch from a telephone to a computer will be able to use a special receiver that is compatible with this new service.

The U of I also has plans to fully automate its campus directory line by November, rather than having a live operator available during the day. It has already started to scale back on campus operators. CITES' associate director, Janet Jones, said the actual number of campus operators has been declining over the years.

"More and more customers are using online technology," said Jones.

In the last month, the number of operators has been cut from five to one, and the final operator is expected to retire in November. Jones said other colleges and universities have already made similar changes to their directory systems.

Categories: Education, Technology

AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 04, 2010

Number of IL Families on Food Stamps Jumps 12 Percent, Sets New Record

Elizabeth Garcia says food stamps allow her to feed her three children.

The Mahomet woman's family is one of the record 780,000 Illinois households who relied on food stamps in June. The state Department of Human Services says the economy is the primary reason more people than ever are using food stamps.

Garcia's family lives mainly on her boyfriend's $540 a month in restaurant wages. She hasn't been able to find work. The 32-year-old says food stamps mean her kids eat healthy food.

But Alana Sykes of Rantoul found out Monday that even her unemployment benefits are too high for her to qualify. Sykes lost her job in state layoffs late last year. And she says those unemployment benefits aren't enough to buy fresh fruit and vegetables.

Categories: Economics, Government, Politics

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