Illinois Public Media News

AP - Illinois Public Media News - May 04, 2010

Carle Hospital Facility Attains New Status

Carle Foundation Hospital has been recognized for its ability to treat stroke victims - and achieving the best possible outcomes for those patients.

Physicians at the Urbana hospital say Advanced Certification from the Joint Commission shows that Carle has expanded its stroke program through personnel and the proper equipment. Neurosurgeon Dr. John Wang says a large part of the certification is the 24/7 coverage Carle provides in its emergency room, as well as specialized care the hospital offers from himself and Dr. Thomas Kim in the stroke center. "I have different things to bring on the table than a neuroradiologist, and likewise," said Wang. "So that combination you don't often find anywhere else actually - that I speak with all sincerity. Because of a lot of the stroke intervention team is composed of purely neuroradiologists, or purely neurosurgeons, or purely neurologists... this collaboration among two important subspecialities relevant to stroke care is very rare."

Wang says the certification itself serves as a validation of Carle's efforts, but the hospital does much more. The newer bi-planer x-ray equipment is capable of taking a 3-D image of a patient's head... resulting in a quicker diagnosis and treatment. Wang says the safety and the success of the procedure are both enhanced as a result. Carle Foundation Hospital partners with 16 other hospitals in the region to begin stroke patient care at those facilities before transferring them to Urbana.

Categories: Health

AP - Illinois Public Media News - May 03, 2010

Quinn Proposes Limiting Property Taxes through Local “Taxpayer Action Boards

Gov. Pat Quinn is proposing legislation that he says would offer tax relief to millions of Illinois property owners.

Quinn plans to present the Homeowner's Property Tax Relief Initiative of 2010 to the General Assembly this week.

The legislation would create a Taxpayer Action Board modeled after the statewide utility watchdog that Quinn helped start in the 1980s.

Quinn says the taxpayer board would be independent and nonpartisan. It would help property owners appeal their tax bills and assessments.

The legislation also looks to make it easier for property owners to get information about the assessment process, including comparable sales statistics.

The proposal would also extend a provision that reduces homeowners' taxable value by $20,000.

Categories: Economics, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - May 03, 2010

Democrat who Withdrew from Lt. Governor’s Race Runs for Governor Instead

The candidate who won the Democratic primary for lieutenant governor only to pull out of the race amid scandal now says he wants to be Illinois' governor.

In a statement Monday, Scott Lee Cohen says he plans to get on the November ballot as an independent.

Cohen quit the lieutenant governor's race amid accusations of failure to pay child support and holding a knife to his girlfriend's throat.

He says he's running because he's tired of mismanagement in Illinois government.

Cohen says he isn't perfect but he's honest. And he says Illinois needs honesty more than it needs perfection right now.

To get on the Illinois ballot, Cohen would need to submit 25,000 signatures from registered voters on petitions by June 21. If Cohen succeeds, he'll face Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn, Republican state Sen. Bill Brady and Green Party candidate Rich Whitney.

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - May 03, 2010

Durbin Cautions Against Expecting a Quick FutureGen Decision

More delays could be in store for a clean coal technology plant in eastern Illinois. The FutureGen Industrial Alliance is still negotiating finances with the state, dragging out a decision by the US Department of Energy on whether to build the plant in Mattoon.

Illinois Democratic US Senator Dick Durbin says the agency is extending its study of the experimental plant.

"I said that the Secretary of Energy had to decide this project on it's merits and I wanted him to do that," Durbin said over the weekend in Springfield. "I think we've made a good strong case, but we don't take anything more granted."

Durbin, the Majority Whip, says he's optimistic the plant will be built.

The Energy Department had planned to announce by now whether to go forward, but the agency has decided to keep studying the alliance's plans another 60 days.

If built, FutureGen would be the worlds' first zero emissions coal-fired power plant. Carbon dioxide created from burning coal would be stored underground. The project would create thousands of construction jobs.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 30, 2010

Coles Co. Leaders Still Awaiting Word on FutureGen Approval

Optimism remains that construction on the long-delayed FutureGen power plant will get the federal government's okay soon.

In the meantime, local officials can do little more than watch and wait for a decision from the Energy Department. It's in talks with corporate members of the FutureGen Alliance who want to get the $1.8 billion dollar coal-to-energy plant built and operating near Mattoon.

Angela Griffin heads the economic development group Coles Together. "As far as we know they're still in negotiations," Griffin said. "There's still a lot of details to be worked out with the agreement going forward, and they're not at liberty at this point to talk about those."

But Griffin says she and others in the Mattoon area are being kept up to date on the talks, even if she doesn't know the details. Griffin wouldn't estimate when the government and the Alliance can reach a conclusion.

She does say that once that agreement takes place, the construction phase will have a big impact on Mattoon. She says plant developers expect to keep cement plants within a 100-mile radius of FutureGen busy as they drill the initial wells for the plant's carbon-sequestration unit.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 30, 2010

Marion County Man Charged In Fatal DUI Crash

A Champaign County judge has set bond at $1 million for a Marion County man accused in a collision that killed a Champaign woman.

Circuit Court Judge John Kennedy set bond Friday for 32-year-old Robert Eagan of Salem, who is charged with aggravated driving under the influence, driving under the influence, and driving while his license was revoked. Eagan was arrested after a collision in the central part of Champaign late Thursday night. Urbana Police had tried to stop Eagan at Lincoln and University Avenues, but he didn't stop after reaching city limits. The crash occurred moments later at Springfield and Elm streets. Champaign County Coroner Duane Northrup has identified the victim as 40-year-old Kimberly Kueffler. Kueffler was driving a vehicle that was hit by a pickup truck. Eagen was being held under suicide watch last night. It was not known if he had an attorney.

Categories: Criminal Justice
Tags: crime

AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 30, 2010

Ameren to Seek Rehearing of its Rate Request, Announced Spending Cuts

Ameren says it will seek a rehearing of its rate case ... after the Illinois Commerce Commission granted the utility only a fraction of what it seeking in increases for gas and electricity delivery.

At the same time, Ameren is cutting budgets, instituting a hiring freeze, reducing its use of contractors, and delaying or canceling some projects and activities.

In an internal newsletter released by the company, Ameren Illinois president Scott Cisel calls the actions "regrettable but necessary".

Ameren spokesman Leigh Morris says their core commitment to delivery reliable energy won't be affected. But he says customers might notice some changes in service.

"This doesn't mean it would, but we could be talking about wait times for calls to customer service, wait times to have new service installed" says Morris. "It could have impacts like that. Those aren't reliability issues but those are service quality issues."

The I-C-C voted 3 to 2 Thursday to allow Ameren just $4.75 million of the $130 million it was seeking in additional revenue on delivery rates. Morris says the company was surprised by the ruling, and believes it had made a strong argument for the full increase. Ameren has 30 days to seek a rehearing of its rate request. There's no guarantee that the ICC will grant a rehearing.

Categories: Energy, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 30, 2010

Illinois Redistricting Proposals Fall Short

Partisan fighting over the best way to improve the way Illinois draws its legislative map means there likely won't be any change.

A proposal backed by Democrats to overhaul the process fell two votes shy in the Illinois House Thursday.

At least one Republican had to get on board for it to pass. None did.

The political stakes of redistricting are high, as a district can be drawn to all but assure victory for a party's candidates.

The current system often leaves which party controls the map-drawing to chance.

House Majority Leader Barbara Flynn Currie says the Democrats' plan is an improvement. Instead, she says, Illinois will be left with the status quo. That process breaks a deadlock by drawing a Republican or Democrat's name from a stovetop hat, like the one Abraham Lincoln wore.

"And when they pull a name out of a hat we'll be the laughing stock again," says Currie.

But Republicans say they couldn't support the Democrats' proposal because it allows legislators to handpick the voters who will be responsible for their political fate. The GOP says its plan ... which is favored by groups including the League of Women Voters ... removes that self interest. An independent commission draws the map from the start.

GOP Representative Jim Watson of Jacksonville, an Iraq War veteran, chided the Democrats' plan for giving legislators the ability to draw their own districts.

"Two years ago I was in Iraq and I was helping a nation try to forge a democracy", said Watson. "And I will tell you right now if we would have said 'Hey Anbar Provincial Chairman ... you want to make your own map and have legislative districts and vote on it?' ... that the United Nations would have come in and said 'hell no!' "

But Democrats blocked that plan in the General Assembly. and a campaign to collect enough petition signatures to get it on the ballot has fallen short.

"We did a great deal in a very, very, very short time", says League of Woman Voters executive director Jan Czarnik. She says that in just four-and-a-half months, the Fair Map campaign volunteers gathered an estimated 150,000 to 160,000 signatures. But 280,000 valid signatures are needed to get a constitutional amendment on the Illinois ballot.

The deadline to submit petitions to get a constitutional amendment on the Illinois ballot is Monday.

Categories: Government, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - April 30, 2010

Failed Redistricting Plans Shared Common Feature

Efforts to reform the way Illinois redraws its legislative districts every ten years appear to have run out of steam. A proposed constitutional amendment backed by Democrats fell two votes short of passage in the Illinois House Thursday.

And organizers of a petition drive to get another proposal on the ballot say they've failed to collect enough signatures. Despite their differences, Both proposals actually featured the same key method to fix the state's redistricting process. Illinois Public Media's Jim Meadows reports.

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Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 30, 2010

ICC Cuts Ameren Rate Hike Request By About 95-Percent

The Illinois Commerce Commission has rejected most of a request from Ameren to raise electricity and natural gas rates.

Ameren had sought an additional $162 million from customers. On Thursday, the ICC approved $5 million of that increase. The utility company released a statement, saying the decision may hinder Ameren's ability to provide the service customers expect. Spokesman Leigh Morris says the company will spend a few days reviewing the decision to decide its next steps... including whether to appeal. The Citizen Utility Board's Jim Chilsen praised the decision. "Ameren was asking for way too much," said Chilsen. "And the rate hike that it got will give the company all the funds it needs to provide safe, reliable service and to return a fair profit to stockholders."

ICC spokeswoman Beth Bosch says the cuts of more than 95-percent came from various line items on the delivery side of Ameren's power. "Ranging from incentive compensation to benefits, working cash, what kinds of projects they consider useful the rates could be collected on, operations and maintenance," said Bosch. She says the ICC also brought down the rate hike from what an administrative law judge had requested. The decision is also based on reviews from several parties, including local governments, the Attorney General, and AARP. Bosch says all of Ameren's gas rates should go down as a result of the decision, with electric rate hikes of 10-percent or less for Ameren IP, CILCO, and CIPS customers.

Categories: Economics, Energy
Tags: economy, energy

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