Illinois Public Media News

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 15, 2011

Champaign County Board Member Arrested for DUI

A Champaign County Board member has been arrested for DUI. Michael Richards is due back in court next month following a January 27 arrest. State's Attorney Julia Reitz's office said the 31-year-old Richards was spotted by a sheriff's deputy driving north in the southbound lanes of US 45 in Savoy around 3-30 that morning. He admitted to having four mixed drinks prior to driving and refused to take a blood alcohol test, which results in a one-year suspension of driving privileges.

Richards faces a misdemeanor DUI charge and was ticketed for improper lane usage.

The District 6 Democrat was appointed to the Champaign County Board in 2007.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 15, 2011

DOJ Will Not Pursue Civil Rights Case in 2009 Carrington Police Shooting

The U.S. Department of Justice will not pursue a civil rights case in the 2009 police-shooting death of Champaign teenager Kiwane Carrington.

The city of Champaign released a letter it received Monday, saying the Justice Department's Civil Rights division had closed its investigation into the incident and "concluded that the evidence in the case does not establish a prosecutable violation of any federal criminal civil rights statute."

The 15-year-old Carrington was shot to death in October of 2009 when Police Chief R.T. Finney and Officer Daniel Norbits confronted and wrestled with Carrington and another teen behind a Vine Street house. Police had suspected that the two were trying to break into the home, but it was later discovered that Carrington was welcome in the house, which was unoccupied at the time. A state police investigation concluded that Norbits' gun discharged accidentally during the altercation. Finney had been working a regular patrol that day. Norbits was given a 30-day suspension for not properly controlling his weapon.

The incident added fuel to long-standing suspicion against police in the African-American community.

In a complaint to the Department of Justice shortly after the shooting, Champaign-Urbana Citizens for Peace and Justice was critical of the local investigation, claiming that evidence was mishandled and that Champaign County State's Attorney Julia Rietz poorly analyzed the case. The group's Aaron Ammons said he has not heard back from the Department of Justice regarding that complaint, and added that he is not surprised by the outcome of the department's recent investigation into the shooting.

"I guess deep in our hearts and the recesses of our minds, we'd like to believe that there would be some justice at some level within our government," Ammons said. "When you don't see that, it is disappointing."

The case has been reviewed by various local, state, and federal agencies. The Department of Justice's recent investigation came as no surprise to Seon Williams, a friend of the Carrington family.

"The situation and outcome has been the same, so I don't think the community's surprised on the next phase of this thing." Williams said. "I think we're all just trying to heal and trying to move forward."

In a statement, Chief R.T. Finney said, "We are confident of the thoroughness of all investigations and satisfied that the outcomes were all the same. This was a very tragic incident for all involved and the closure of this investigation will help us all move forward."

The city settled a civil lawsuit with Carrington's family last year. A second civil suit filed by the family of the other juvenile is pending.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 14, 2011

Former Urbana Mayor Jeff Markland Dies

Jeff Markland, who was mayor of Urbana throughout the 1980s, died Monday at his home in the city. He was 70 years old, and the Champaign County Coroner's office attributes his death to natural causes.

Markland served one term on the Urbana City Council before winning election in 1977 to the first of four terms as mayor. Some of the people he appointed are still with the city, including city comptroller Ron Eldridge.

"Jeff really had a deep, deep passion and really cared for the city of Urbana," Eldridge said. "He was very much, I think a moderate, even though he was with the Republican Party, he really did not let national politics enter into the decisions of the city."

Markland's tenure as mayor ended in 1993, when he lost a close race to Democrat Tod Satterthwaite. But Satterthwaite said despite his differences with the Republican Markland, they shared a dedication to improving Urbana's business climate and neighborhoods. He credits Markland with finding good people for Urbana's top administrative positions.

"Once you had the qualified people there, let them do their job," Satterthwaite said in describing Markland's approach. "And of course, he would direct them on what kind of projects he would like to see, but let them find out what was going on in their area, and let them bring suggested projects back to him and the council for review and approval."

In addition to Eldridge, Public Works Director Bill Grey is the other Markland appointee who is still with the city of Urbana. Grey said he was attracted to Urbana by Markland's stability and professionalism. Funeral services for Jeff Markland are pending. Renner-Wikoff in Urbana are handling the arrangements.

Categories: Economics, Government, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 14, 2011

Team of Carle Doctors, Other Health Care Professionals Plan for Haiti

Teams of American health care workers are still heading to Haiti, more than a year after an earthquake left much of the heart of that country in ruins.

Amanda Frye is leading a team called "Field of Dreams for Haiti" - it's a team of 17 nurses, doctors and other volunteer health professionals from Carle Foundation Hospital. They're raising funds to help them buy supplies and complete their trip, which begins next month.

Frye hopes her group will be able to perform hundreds of surgeries during their one-week stay -- she says it will be packed with work but well worth the effort. "We love what we do up here, but it's a nice break to go down there and to be able to treat people who are grateful and need us and know that we're just practicing simple medicine -- no politics, just good people who have a lot of love to share," Frye told WILL's Celeste Quinn on Monday's Afternoon Magazine.

Frye says her group is headed to the only critical-care hospital currently operating in Haiti, though there are a number of small regional clinics.

Oral/maxillofacial surgeon Cole Anderson says more than a year after the earthquake that ravaged Haiti's largest city, the country is still struggling to provide basic emergency care. He says it's hard for an American to imagine the need: "For someone who's uninsured and doesn't have health care (in the United States), there's urgent and emergent health care available in the emergency room and people won't be turned away. Down in Haiti, that's not true. There just aren't people to provide the care."

Among the fundraising projects is an effort by area hair salons to donate a portion of their proceeds this weekend to the trip, but people can also make a donation online through the Carle Development Foundation's website: http://www.carle.org. They've also set up a Facebook page for people to follow their activities while they're in Haiti.

Categories: Health

AP - Illinois Public Media News - February 14, 2011

State Police Director to Go to Another Agency

Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn's office says acting state police director Jonathon Monken will move to the Emergency Management Agency.

Spokeswoman Mica Matsoff says the governor will announce the move shortly.

The 31-year-old Monken has been acting state police director for nearly two years, but the Senate has never confirmed the appointment.

He would have gotten the permanent job by default after Wednesday because the deadline for Senate action would expire. However, the Senate raised the possibility of a last-minute hearing to block Monken.

Senators say he doesn't have experience as a police officer to run the agency even though he was a military police officer who served in Iraq.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 14, 2011

Exhibit at UI School of Law Outlines Women’s Struggles in the Legal Profession

A group dedicated to documenting Illinois' legal history will tell the story of some of the first women to enter the profession.

A three-month exhibit on some of the state's first female attorneys opens Monday at the University of Illinois' College of Law.

The exhibit developed by the Illinois Supreme Court Historic Preservation Commission serves two purposes. It tells the stories of women who paved the way for many others in the courtroom. But it's also aimed at helping the public understand similar issues today. And Commission Executive Director William Wheeler hopes those touring the exhibit can add to it.

"We're trying to reach out to people and tell them what we know, but perhaps as important or more important is to find out what people in the community know, certainly the legal community," he said. "There are the family members of Supreme Court justices or judges who served for a long time. They have stores they could share with us. We'd like to hear those."

The stories will include that of Ada Kepley. In 1870, she became the first American woman to graduate from law school, earning her degree at Northwestern, which was then known as Union College of Law. Her favorite causes were women's suffrage and temperance, or the reduced consumption of alcohol. Kepley made her home in Effingham. Florence Kelley became Illinois' first female factory inspector in 1890, while Catherine McCulloch was the first woman to serve as justice of the peace.

The state's Supreme Court historic preservation commission, which was started in 2007, will work with other Illinois law schools over the next two years to host similar exhibits. Opening ceremonies for the women's legal history exhibit are Monday afternoon at 3 at the U of I College of Law. It will remain open through May 12th.

(Photo courtesy of William Wheeler, Illinois Supreme Court Historic Preservation Commission)

Categories: Education, History

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 13, 2011

Ill. Lawmaker Looks at Selling Ad Space on License Plates for New Revenue

Imagine riding in a car with a license plate that has an advertisement tacked on promoting a restaurant, soft drink, or sports team. Well, that may become a reality in Illinois.

One Chicago Democrat has introduced legislation designed to create corporate-sponsored license plates to generate revenue. It is part of an effort to help plug the state's $15 billion budget deficit.

"It's not a novel idea to have advertising on certain stadiums, or buses, or somewhere," State Sen. John Mulroe (D-Chicago) said. "But we need to start thinking of other ways to generate revenue that's going to keep recurring year after year."

The plan would give motorists the option of purchasing cheaper license plates with the advertisements. Companies interested in promoting their business would make up the cost difference, and pay an additional amount. The money would go to the state and a contractor overseeing the program, but it's unclear how much money both sides would get.

"If we took a million people that wanted to be engaged in this program, and if the state were to say get $10 a plate, it could be an additional $10 million a year," Mulroe said.

Mulroe calls this a "win-win" for the entire state because taxes would not go up, and Illinois would generate more revenue.

Texas is currently the only state to sell corporate license plates. Other states including Florida, Nebraska, and Virginia have looked at similar proposals.

(Photo courtesy of CyberDrive Illinois)


AP - Illinois Public Media News - February 11, 2011

Egypt news excites Chicago Muslims

News of the resignation of Egypt's thirty-year ruler Hosni Mubarak sent waves of excitement through the Chicago area's Muslim community as they went to afternoon prayer services Friday.

Egyptian-American worshipers at the Mosque Foundation in Bridgeview, Illinois, cried with relief as they called the change a "watershed moment" in the history of Egypt and the Middle East. "We are so proud," Raba Gomaa said during a press conference arranged by the Council of Islamic Organizations of Greater Chicago (CIOGC).

Though the change in Egypt's regime was announced just hours before the service began, it was the topic of Sheikh Jamal Said's sermon.

"We would like to congratulate our brothers and sisters in Egypt," Said said. "The tyrant is gone, Elhamdulillah. The tyrant is gone."

In the women's worship space below, female congregants jubilantly greeted each other with the Arabic phrase that has become a refrain during the weeks of protest: "Tahya Masr!" ("Long Live Egypt").

The high emotions followed a period of deep despondency that set in with many Thursday, when Mubarak indicated in a speech that he had no intention of stepping down. But Karima Mohamed, who left Egypt roughly 20 years ago, said when she heard that speech she knew Mubarak's time was coming to an end. "After two minutes we know something (was going to) happen," said Mohamed. "The people (would) not accept it because he tried to play a game on the people, but the people over there, they're more smarter than what he did."

Others at the service said they believe the change in Egypt will ripple through the rest of the Middle East.

"There's 22 Arabic-speaking countries," CIOGC President Dr. Zaher Sahloul said. "Two of them are right now free: Tunisia and Egypt. Twenty are left."

Oussama Jamal, Vice President of the Mosque Foundation, expressed similar hopes that the developments in Egypt won't stop at that country's borders.

"We hope it is a cold, and everybody will catch it soon," he said.

Many of the Egyptian-Americans said they are confident that their countrymen will successfully steer through the transition period to a peaceful and fair democracy, and they're looking forward to helping in any way they can.

"In ten years you can see you can see Egypt not less than Europe or America," Mohamed said. "It will be in the top again, insh'Allah.

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - February 11, 2011

Ill. Senator Proposes Minimum Wage of $10 an Hour

An Illinois lawmaker is pushing to raise the state's minimum wage to more than $10 an hour -- higher than anywhere else in the United States.

The Chicago Sun-Times reports that Democratic Sen. Kimberly Lightford of Maywood has introduced legislation to raise the minimum wage by 50 cents plus the rate of inflation every year until it reaches the point where it's equivalent to what $1.60 an hour was in 1968. Today, that would mean an hourly wage of $10.03.

Lightford said she wants to make sure the working poor aren't ignored or forgotten.

But opponents say the proposal could cause businesses to move to other states -- especially if it comes after a recent corporate income tax increase.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 11, 2011

Urbana Joins Nation in Honoring Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln delivered his farewell address in Springfield 150 years ago as he was about to leave for Washington, D.C., and three months later, the first shots of the Civil War were fired.

To mark the anniversary of the start of the war, communities from all over the country simultaneously read the former president's farewell address on Friday in an attempt to break the Guinness Book of World Record for simultaneous reading of a single document. The reigning world record was set in 2006 when more than 223,000 people read from "Charlotte's Web."

The Guinness Book of World Records requires the reading to last five minutes, so people had to recite the brief speech three times. Don Owen, the assistant superintendent for Urbana School District 116, was among the nearly 50 people who participated in the mass reading at the Urbana City Building. Owen, who showed up with his two children, said the speech revealed a lot about Lincoln's presidency.

"He knew that even before the Civil War started that he was going to be a president remembered for either saving or destroying the union," Owen said. "That kind of intelligence and forethought is amazing for any president."

Organizers say it will be several weeks before they know if they broke the record

Meanwhile, Urbana is looking forward to more Lincoln events. City planner Rebecca Bird said in the next couple of months, the city will release a podcast outlining sites with connections to Lincoln.

Categories: Education, History

Page 608 of 785 pages ‹ First  < 606 607 608 609 610 >  Last ›