Illinois Public Media News

AP - Illinois Public Media News - September 08, 2009

Chamapign Officials Discuss New Policing Strategy

Champaign Police want to hear from neighborhoods in order to gear more officers towards crime prevention strategies.

Police Chief R-T Finney will discuss the strategy of 'problem-oriented policing' in the department's annual report before the Champaign City Council tonight. He says the discussions with residents in the past year have ranged from town-hall meetings with neighborhood associations to those focused on one or two blocks. Finney says the complaints start with traffic, but become more specific:

"They'll begin to point out issues other than speeding that really need to be addressed, said Finney. "Some of those issues are drug houses, inattentive landlords who are allowing crimes to occur in their houses, parks that may be affected by certain types of crimes. It may be something like a burglary spree that is occurring in a particular neighborhood."

Finney says often, the solution is as simple as putting up a fence at one home or increasing patrols at a business that sees more service calls.

He says the economy has forced the department to be creative as it shifts officers toward neighborhoods with greater problems. Problem-oriented policing started with meetings in the Garden Hills neighborhood and later moved to homes in the Hill and Church streets areas. Finney says he expects several more neighborhoods will come forth with concerns following tonight's presentation.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - September 08, 2009

Faculty Group Welcomes Trustees, Meeting; Still Wants Input

One day after University of Illinois trustees meet to reorganize the board this week, they'll meet with faculty representatives. So says a member of the Urbana campus' Academic Senate, who says he's impressed with Governor Quinn's picks for trustees posts from last week. Still, Nick Burbules says the Governor ought to meet with faculty when he makes future trustee appointments.

"Everything I've heard about the new members is outstanding," Burbules said. "But as always, we're as much concerned with process as the outcome, and I think we're going to continue to work to trying to urge closer consultation with faculty governance about how these decisions get made in the future."

Burbules says the board of trustees is scheduled to meet with faculty members on Friday to discuss ways to reform the U of I's admissions process. Irregularities in that system led most of the previous trustees to resign after a recommendation from the governor's admissions review commission.

Categories: Education, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - September 04, 2009

More Details on Gov. Quinn’s Selections for UI Trustees

Governor Pat Quinn says the five new trustees he appointed to the University of Illinois board are committed to making sure the school's reputation is "second to none.'' Quinn named the five Friday to fill spots that were vacated when other trustees resigned amid an admissions scandal at the school.

One group that's happy with Governor Quinn's trustee selections is the leadership of the U of I Alumni Association. President and CEO Loren Taylor says four of the five appointees came from a list of candidates the association had provided the governor. The fifth had also been endorsed by some alumni, and Taylor says that candidate is a fine choice too. Quinn didn't pick U of I alumni for his first two appointments, Chris Kennedy and Lawrence Oliver. But Taylor says that didn't faze him. "Our experience in working with the governor was that he would want to consider strongly the recommendations that we had made, so we just felt we needed to be patient," says Taylor. "I think that's paid off." He says the alumni group received interest from about 400 people when the call went out for trustee candidates.

One new trustee hopes the newly-reconstituted board can get the admissions scandal behind it as soon as possible. But former Springfield mayor Karen Hasara says she needs more background into the controversy before she makes any decisions on the fate of President Joseph White and Urbana Chancellor Richard Herman. She enters the trustee's job with 17 years of political office behind her, as a state legislator and as Springfield's former mayor. She says that's prepared her for the scrutiny she'll face in the coming weeks. "I don't particularly like negative things being said but I have gotten to be pretty thick skinned," says Hasara. "So I think I'll be able to get through it okay."

One trustee who voluntarily resigned and was passed over for re-appointment by the governor says Quinn misled him and other now-former trustees. David Dorris turned in his resignation last month along with three other members. Only one, Quinn appointee Ed McMillan, was re-appointed. Two trustees who refused to step down are still on the board. Dorris says he doesn't regret his decision to quit because staying in place would have heaped even more public scorn on him and the University. But he accuses Quinn of making a purely political decision not to fire James Montgomery and Frances Carroll.

"What is very disgusting is the fact that he had made such strong statements and we were all told, in no uncertain terms, that if we did not resign he would forcibly remove us," says Dorris. "I don't know how that man can ever explain away his decision to back down against the two." Dorris worries that a board of trustees with six new members won't have the institutional knowledge to run effectively, and they'll vote for a new chairman without knowing each other. Neither Quinn nor his office has returned many calls from WILL seeking comment.

Categories: Education, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - September 04, 2009

New UI Trustees Named

Gov. Pat Quinn has filled five positions on the University of Illinois board of trustees.

The trustees named Friday are all university graduates. The new members are former Springfield Mayor Karen Hasara, Rockford Dr. Timothy Koritz, retired Exelon executive Pamela Strobel and Carlos Tortolero, president of the National Museum of Mexican Art.

Quinn also reappointed Edward McMillan, a businessman from Greenville who resigned from the board this summer.

The governor's moves Friday follow last week's appointments of Christopher Kennedy and Lawrence Oliver II.

Seven trustees stepped down following reports that political connections played a role in some admissions to the university. James Montgomery and Frances Carroll refused calls to resign.

Categories: Education, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - September 04, 2009

Quinn Ready to Name U. of Ill. Trustees

The University of Illinois should soon have a full board of trustees after most of the members resigned after an admissions scandal at the school.

Gov. Pat Quinn said he was ready to fill the five remaining spots on Friday.

The governor said he would announce his picks so there would be a full board in place for next week's meeting.

But he wouldn't say on Thursday whether any of the trustees who resigned at his request would be reappointed.

A state panel investigated how clout influenced university admissions and found that some unqualified students with political connections had gotten in. The panel said all nine trustees should resign as a result. Seven did, but two --- James Montgomery and Frances Carroll --- refused and Quinn decided against removing them to avoid a legal fight.

Last week Quinn appointed two other new commissioners: Chicago businessman Chris Kennedy and Boeing executive Lawrence Oliver II.

Categories: Education, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - September 03, 2009

Longtime County Board Democrats Won’t Run in 2010

The names of Steve Beckett and Barb Wysocki won't appear on Champaign County ballots next year. It's a move that could change the slight 15-12 advantage that Democrats hold on the County Board. The two Democrats both say the time is right, with a lot of building projects that they were part of having been completed. For Beckett, that includes the restoring of the county courthouse clock and bell tower. But he says it's been a frustrating time on the County Board, and that it's 'unwieldy' and too large. Beckett says it needs a diverse representation, but with less than its current 27 members.

He says there are also too many instances in which members of one political party aren't free to express their mind. "Because they go into a caucus..' says Beckett. "...and a majority of them think one way on a particular issue, means that the people that were in the minority on that issue within the party caucus has to surrender their views and vote the way the party thinks they ought to vote. I don't believe in that. I just don't think it's right." Beckett says he and Wysocki both became outcasts as the result of some caucus votes.

Wysocki says she agrees the county board should be reduced from 27 to about 18 members. She's hoping the Board will make an effort to merge the Champaign-Urbana Public Health Board with the County Board of Health, saying services aren't currently being provided in an efficient manner. Neither Beckett or Wysocki have suggested anyone to succeed them in County Board District 9.

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - September 02, 2009

Hynes Announces for Governor, Proposes Progressive Income Tax

Illinois Comptroller Dan Hynes formally announced his campaign for governor Wednesdayby saying he would try to raise state income taxes on the wealthy as a way to address the state's budget crisis.

Hynes will probably face incumbent Gov. Pat Quinn in next year's Democratic primary.

At a news conference in Chicago, Hynes described a new progressive tax --- which taxes higher-income earners at higher rates --- as the cornerstone of his plan to put the state's financial house in order. He said his plan would spare 97 percent of Illinois residents from paying more.

Hynes contrasted his call for a progressive tax with proposals this year from Quinn to raise the existing flat-income tax rate by 50 percent on everyone. Only a few states use a flat income tax, which taxes everyone at the same rate.

But Quinn says a progressive tax is the kind of thing he pushed for five years ago but that Hynes then opposed. And Quinn characterized Hynes as a professional naysayer who's refused to work with him on anything.

Quinn didn't directly say he wants a progressive tax. But he did say he believes taxes should be paid according to one's ability to pay.

Quinn's original tax hike proposal in March included a tripling of the personal tax exemption, which he said would actually lower state income tax payments for about half of Illinois taxpayers.

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - September 02, 2009

Former Catlin Mayor Chad Hays Endorsed by Black for 104th House Seat

When he announced last week that he wouldn't run for another term as state representative, Bill Black (R - Danville) predicted a front-runner would emerge quickly in the race to succeed him in the 104th House District. On Wednesday, Black made it clear who he thinks the front-runner should be, by endorsing the former mayor of Catlin, Chad Hays.

At a news conference in Catlin kicking off the Hays campaign, Bill Black said Chad Hays had earned his unqualified endorsement. He told a crowd of supporters and schoolchildren that Hays had "a proven record", and was "a hard worker, an honest man who would not let Springfield change that". Black's introduction of Hays was greeted with applause from the gathering assembled in the bleachers at the Catlin Recreation Complex's football and track field. Hays co-chaired the committee that led efforts to build the Complex. Construction of the all-weather track with the help of volunteers earned Catlin a Governor's Home Town Award in 2003.

When it came his turn to speak, Hays pointed to his leadership role on the committee that oversaw construction of the complex as one of his qualifications for the legislature. He says if elected to the Illinois House, he'll be a hard worker and a consensus builder. Hays, who served two terms as mayor of Catlin in the 1990s, says Illinois faces serious problems, "but we must have the courage to reinvent Illinois as a place that is ready and open for business". He continued, "We must invite and encourage a new generation of leadership. We must embrace the change and articulate a vision for the future, that ensures that all parts of this state get a fair shake and an equal opportunity."

Hays is vice-president of Development and Mission Services at Provena United Samaritans Medical Center in Danville. He describes himself as a fiscal conservative, pro-life, pro-2nd Amendment, but ready to consider a casino for Danville, if it brings jobs to the area.

Former State Senator Judith Myers also endorsed Hays at the news conference.

Chad Hays is the first to announce his candidacy for the 104th District seat in the Illinois House. Vermilion County Recorder of Deeds Barb Young has also been mentioned as a possible Republican contender.

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - September 02, 2009

Doorhangers and Windshield Handbills Now Legal in Champaign

Laws banning the placement of handbills on the windshields of parked cars and on the doorknobs of people's homes have been lifted in Champaign.

The Champaign City Council voted 8 to 1 lTuesday night to repeal its ban on distributing handbills on cars and as doorhangers in residential areas. City officials say recent federal court decisions indicate that the bans are likely unconstitutional.

City Councilman and attorney Tom Bruno says he's heard from residents who want to see the bans on doorhangers and windshield handbills continue in Champaign. But he says if they did so, they would be impossible to enforce.

"We would never our city attorney or expect the (county) state's attorney to prosecute somebody for an invalid law", says Bruno, "so, as much as you might wish we left this ordinance on the books, it's already unenforceable --- legally unenforceable."

City officials say there may still be options --- such as licensing and the city's litter ordinance --- for limiting the use of doorhangers and windshield handbills. But for now, Councilman Bruno says you can legally forbid doorhangers at your home by posting "No Trespassing" or "No Soliciting" signs. He says it might be even more effective to complain to the advertisers involved. And Councilwoman Karen Foster suggests complaining to the owners of parking lots that allow windshield handbilling.

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - September 02, 2009

Champaign City Council Approves Additional $25 Towing Fee

It will soon cost you more in Champaign, any time your car gets towed by the city.

Starting in October, the city of Champaign will charge a 25 dollar fee whenever they initiate a tow. That's on top of the fee charged by the tow truck operators the city hires --- and that fee will be going up five dollars as well.

Police Chief R-T Finney says the new fee will cover the cost to the city of handling the paperwork on each city-initiated tow.

"Every tow that occurs in the city that's a relocation tow off of private property, or a city-initiated tow from a traffic accident, any type of initiated tow that the police department or Public Works or Parking would initiate, that all has to be processed by the police department," explains Finney.

The fee will NOT apply to private towing --- such as when your car breaks down, and you hire a tow-truck to take it to a mechanic.

The towing administrative fee is one of several new and increased fees the Champaign City Council approved last June to help balance the city budget. Council members approved the specifics of the towing fee Tuesday night.

Tow truck operators resisted the new fee, which they have to collect on behalf of the city. The five-dollar increase in their own fee came as a result of negotiations between the operators and Champaign city officials.

Categories: Government, Politics

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