Illinois Public Media News

AP - Illinois Public Media News - February 23, 2010

Urbana City Council Considers New Draft of Criminal Public Nuisance Ordinance

Urbana city officials ran into heavy criticism last fall when they proposed fining landlords who allow criminal behavior to continue unabated on their property. Now, the city is proposing a new version of the ordinance.

Mayor Laurel Prussing says the re-drafted ordinance is virtually identical to the one already on the books in neighboring Champaign. Landlords who fail or refuse to do anything to control criminal activities on their properities like drug trafficking or gang violence could face fines. But, at the Urbana City Council's Committee of the Whole meeting on Monday night, Prussing said landlords would have a clear process whereby they can work with the city to deal with the problems first.

"If (the process) doesn't work, and the landlord has tried", said Prussing. "they will not be punished. I mean, we're trying to work with people."

Most Urbana city council members voiced support for the new ordinance last night. But Republican Heather Stevenson said the new version of the ordinance was no better than the old one. And Democrat David Gehrig said that while the new ordinance was an improvement, but he still had doubts.

"There's still something sitting in my gut saying that this is an ordinance about A being punished for what B does", said Gehrig. "And I just haven't been able to get it to sit right yet."

Attorney Kip Pope told the city council that ordinance would penalize landlords unfairly for tenant behavior they can't control, especially since Urbana city code prevents them from turning down tenants with felony convictions.

The Urbana City Council is keeping the ordinance in committee for revisions, and to get public feedback.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - February 22, 2010

UI Campus Committees Look For Cuts, Revenue In Various Programs

A series of ad hoc committees have started the arduous task of identifying areas on the University of Illinois' Urbana campus that might find ways to make cuts or even raise some revenue.

'Stewarding Excellence at Illinois' is expected to last several months. One of the committees has already identified four areas for evaluation due to the higher education funding crisis. Graduate College Dean Deba Dutta chairs the Campus Steering Committee. He says his group is meeting twice a week, and expects to identify more areas over the next several months. "And we'll keep on doing this until we, as a campus, feel that we have looked everything that needs to be looked at," says Dutta. "I mean that's the general feeling. I can't say that there's going to be 15 projects, or 35 projects. But we have in this process, we have a lot of involvement of faculty, students, and staff."

The first four areas under review are the Institute of Aviation, Information Technology, The Office of Vice Chancellor for Public Engagement, and Allocation of undergraduate scholarships. Dutta says these areas are more administrative in nature, but he stresses that no cuts or other changes will be decided for some time. Faculty teams assigned to each of these projects will look at charge letters from U of I administrators. "We're not to limit them to think, ok, do this or do that," says Dutta. "Just trying to give an idea to consult with stakeholders, look at the value, how it aligns with the institution, and several other criteria that are spelled out on the web site.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - February 22, 2010

UI Conference Tackles Mounds of E-Waste

Environmental experts are looking for a little creativity this week when it comes to diverting tons of old TVs, computers or cell phones from the landfill - or worse.

Electronic waste can create pollutants as well as lots of solid plastic or metal waste, and much of it will come from machines that are still in working order. A two-day symposium on the University of Illinois campus begins Tuesday to address the large-scale problem.

Tim Lindsey is with the U of I's Sustainable Technology Center. He says everyone involved in the process - from manufacturers to retailers to recyclers - are getting together to talk about reducing the waste stream, and new reuse methods can play a huge role.

"You can take a ten-year old Pentium 3 computer, you could refurbish it, load it with Windows 7, and for most applications it will perform as well as a brand new computerwith respect to word processing, surfing the internet, spreadsheets and so forth. It would do just as well," Lindsey said.

Lindsey says one future answer may be to rethink how we buy electronics. He says consumers might warm up to the concept of buying a shell computer or cell phone and occasionally improving its performance with the newest technology.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - February 22, 2010

Bunge to Close its Danville Soy Processing Operation in April

A section of Bunge North America's massive downtown Danville facility will close in two months.

About 100 employees will face layoffs when the plant's soybean processing operation comes to an end. Bunge spokeswoman Deb Seidell says the Danville site doesn't have the soy-oil refining facility that newer plants have.

"When you crush the soybeans and you get the protein meal and you get the oil, generally that oil needs to be further processed before it can go into the food stream," Seidell said. "From Danville it has to be trucked or sent by rail somewhere else to be refined because there's not a refinery attached to Danville."

But Seidell says there are no plans to build that refinery because the capacity for processing soybeans is outstripping demand. She says management and staff employees will receive outplacement assistance and severance while Bunge will negotiate with unions over the impact on other employees.

Bunge plans to keep its soy and corn elevators and dry corn mill open - they employ about 185 workers.

Categories: Business, Economics, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - February 22, 2010

One County To Sell Its Nursing Home, Another Sees Financial Improvement

While one area county has gotten out of nursing home operations, the Champaign County Nursing Home appears to have turned a corner after a number of financial problems.

A week from today, Livingston Manor in Pontiac will have a new operator. Livingston County Board Chairman Bill Fairfield says while the level of care there is good, he says the facilities are nearly 50 years old, with one bathroom per wing. As a result, Fairfield says it's hard to find new patients. Livingston Manor has about 35 residents now, with 122 beds.

County officials have spent the last couple of years working with the non-profit Good Samaritan Home of Flanagan to assume operations at the Pontiac home. And by September 2011, Fairfield says Good Samaritan will have a new facility built, with the help of an economic development grant from the county.

"They have a couple of ideas on property, which would be somewhere in the vicinity of St. James Hospital in Pontiac, to build a new facility," said Fairfield. "And I believe that once they have a facility that is modern, with a private bath and all, that you will see the census rise."

Census has not been a problem of late at Champaign County's nursing home. Mike Scavatto is president of Management Performance Associates, the St. Louis based group that's helping with management of home. He's aiming for an average census of about 195 patients, and they're close to it now. But there's also been an increase in private pay residents, a lower percentage of them on Medicaid, and less contract nursing. But Scavatto says there are other goals in mind.

"We're very interested in expanding our services in dementia and doing more with rehabilitation. And I think those are the two key services that will help us out," said Scavotto.

The Champaign County Nursing Home closed out 2008 with a one-point-8 million dollar loss. Scavatto expects losses from 2009 to show a figure closer to 150-thousand dollars.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - February 22, 2010

Granite Sculpture Goes On Display in Downtown Urbana

The first of four sculptures is on display in downtown Urbana as part of an initiative to generate more local interest in public art. 'Fanfare' was installed Friday in the courtyard of the Iron Post at Race and Elm streets. One of 98 images considered for placement in the city by two juries, it's a granite art piece conceived by Shawn Morin, the head of the sculpting program at Ohio's Bowling Green University. Urbana Public Arts Coordinator Anna Hochhalter says the sculpture meshes well in its location, a live music venue.

"It has kind of a flair granite at the top and different kinds and colors of granite, and lots of different textures and stone," says Hochhalter. "So the jury thought that it would work really well against the brick background and also really compliment the native plantings that are in the courtyard."

The sculptures are being provided on two-year loans. The other three will be installed in May; one on Green Street by the Urbana Free Library, with two others to be placed along Philo Road. The city has option of obtaining additional art for a temporary exhibit, and even purchasing some later.

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - February 19, 2010

State’s High Court Says Ryan Must Forfeit All State Pension

The Illinois Supreme Court says former Governor George Ryan must forfeit all of his state pension for crimes he committed as secretary of state and governor.

Ryan is currently serving a 6 1/2-year racketeering and fraud sentence. He had been hoping to salvage a $60,000-a-year pension, based on his years as a state lawmaker and lieutenant governor.

Ryan wasn't convicted of committing any crimes when he held those offices. But the high court ruled 6-1 on Friday that he's ineligible for any state pension. Before his conviction, Ryan had been due to draw a pension of more than $197,000.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - February 19, 2010

Kiwane Carrington Shooting Death Called Accidental by Coroner’s Jury

A Champaign County Coroner's Jury has ruled that the October police shooting death of Kiwane Carrington was an accident.

Coroner Duane Northrup says he would hope that this information would help provide some closure for the Champaign teen's family. After a task force investigation led by state police, Champaign County State's Attorney Julia Reitz ruled last year that Champaign police officer Daniel Norbits would not face criminal charges. He and Police Chief RT Finney confronted Carrington and another teen following a report of a break-in. Northrup says while some may disagree with the decision of authorities, a coroner's inquest provides an independent review of the death. "And then we can say it's not just a biased opinion by the coroner's office or the police department or the state's attorney," says Northrup. "These jurors were picked randomly from the community. They came in, the same information was given to them, and they made the determination that it was accidental. And I think that has the bigger impact on the familes."

Kenesha Williams, Carrington's sister and legal guardian, says testimony at the coroner's inquest provided conflicting information about what occurred on the afternoon of October 9th, but didn't elaborate. But Williams says she expected the death to be ruled accidental. A state police investigator noted Thursday that marijuana was found in Carrington's blood, but Nortrup noted it's hard to say whether that played a role in the teen's behavior when confronted by police. Based on an interview with Officer Norbits, State Police investigator Lisa Crouder testified that Carrington kept putting his hands in his pockets and failed to comply with orders.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 19, 2010

Illinois Board of Higher Education Chairwoman Adapting to Additional Role

One immediate change following former Governor Rod Blagojevich's removal from office last year was the overhaul of four state pension boards. Governor Pat Quinn signed legislation last spring that not only changed the membership of those boards, but moved the chair of Illinois' Board of Higher Education into the same role with the State Universities Retirement System. Carrie Hightman has served in both capacities since July.

AM 580's Jeff Bossert spoke with her about the dual role, and the funding challenges faced by colleges and universities:

Download mp3 file

AP - Illinois Public Media News - February 18, 2010

Champaign PD Gets First State Accreditation

The Champaign Police Department has become the second in the state to follow the requirements of a new state accreditation program.

The Illinois Law Enforcement Accreditation program makes sure that police agencies follow common standards. Champaign chief R. T. Finney says the department will now undergo regular reviews to make sure its standards are well-explained and followed. He says the designation is more than just a new level of bureaucracy.

"While it seems like it's paper, much of what the officer on the street does is contained in policy -- how they act, what they should do," Finney said. "So the officers have the ability to go back to the policy when they have a question, be able to read the policy and have some confidence that this policy is within standards for the state of Illinois."

Those standards got an especially close review late last year as Champaign police were dealing with the aftermath of the Kiwane Carrington shooting. The case drew attention to a change in the policy regarding use of lethal force - the city council ordered clarification on when officers are able to use their weapons.


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