Illinois Public Media News

AP - Illinois Public Media News - March 14, 2011

Indiana House Leaders Talk More, but Don’t Resolve Boycott

More talks between the Republican and Democratic leaders of the Indiana House might be inching the two sides closer to resolving the now three-week-long boycott by Democratic legislators.

The lack of any firm breakthrough, however, meant most Democratic members skipped Monday's floor session, continuing to leave the House with too few members to conduct business and the Democratic leader saying the boycott would continue Tuesday.

Republican Speaker Brian Bosma and Democratic leader Patrick Bauer said Monday they spoke by phone several times over the weekend. Bauer called them "fairly good talks," while Bosma said "perhaps" progress was made.

A Republican-backed proposal to allow state vouchers to help parents send their children to private schools has been among the sticking points of education- and labor-related bills that Democrats say they found objectionable and prompted them to leave for Illinois on Feb. 22.

Bauer told reporters Monday that he believed an agreement could be close on amending the voucher bill to further limit its scope, but he didn't provide details.

"I just haven't gotten that all nailed down yet completely," Bauer said. "I think they're amenable to cut out some of the huge fiscal hit on that."

The Republican sponsor of the bill has proposed capping the number of vouchers to 7,500 during the program's first year and 15,000 during the second year.

Bauer said Democrats still had unresolved concerns about a bill on government construction project wages, which includes provisions ending requirements that nonunion companies sign onto agreements involving union rules.

Bill sponsor Rep. Bill Davis, R-Portland, said he would support modifying the bill so that the state's prevailing construction wage law, which now applies to government projects of $150,000 or more, would start at $500,000 rather than the proposed $1 million level. He said he also would agree to delete a proposed complete exemption for public school and state university projects.

Bosma didn't seem certain that the amendments to those bills would be enough to bring back the boycotting Democrats.

"Every time we get there, there seems to be one more thing," Bosma said. "I'm just not exactly sure what they need at this point."

Rep. Terry Goodin of Austin, one of two Democrats representing his party on the House floor Monday, said he thought Bosma would have resolved the impasse by now.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - March 14, 2011

Quinn Vetoes Two Clean-Coal Projects

Gov. Pat Quinn dealt a major blow to plans for two coal gasification plants Monday, using his veto pen to strike down legislation that would have locked in rates for the facilities.

In a veto message, Quinn said plans to build the synthetic natural gas facilities in southwest Jefferson County and in Chicago's south suburbs would result in higher utility bills for Illinoisans.

"Our investments in clean coal must not come at the expense of consumers," Quinn noted. "As we lead the way out of this historic recession, we must always be mindful of the effect our policies will have on the people of Illinois."

Both plants were touted as potential new users of Illinois coal, as well as major job creators. The Illinois Coal Association earlier estimated the facility near Waltonville to be built by Aurora-based Power Holdings LLC could use as much as 2 million tons of coal annually and employ hundreds of people.

The company was planning to use coal mined in nearby Washington County.

"It's a shame the governor chose to do this," said Sen. John Jones, R-Mount Vernon, who co-sponsored the legislation. "Governor Quinn has proved once again he's running jobs out of the state of Illinois."

A number of southern Illinois groups supported the plant, including Southern Illinois University, local chambers of commerce, state and federal lawmakers and mayors of towns from Mount Vernon to Marion.

The legislation would have allowed the company to enter into long-term contracts to sell the gas the plant would produce. Ameren and other gas suppliers would have had to purchase the synthetic gas for the next 10 years, even if cheaper natural gas was available elsewhere.

Quinn signaled he was committed to boosting clean-coal technology, but said the two measures would allow the companies to lock in unusually high rates.

The measures, which were approved in the lame duck legislative session in January, were opposed by the Citizens Utility Board and Attorney General Lisa Madigan's office.

Categories: Energy, Government, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - March 14, 2011

UI Pres: Employee Reduction Program Could Be Used Again

University of Illinois President Michael Hogan said a voluntary employee reduction program on the Urbana campus went so well that it should be considered at the Springfield and Chicago campuses.

Faculty and staff were given a chance last year to resign or retire, and walk away with half of their salary, up to a maximum of $75,000. More than 480 employees left the U of I last spring to take the buyout, while 81 of those employees returned on a part-time basis. In addition, 70 professors are expected to leave in August.

The U of I's Associate Provost for Human Resources, Elyne Cole, said the number of employees who agreed to leave their jobs was "higher than expected." She said the university is expected to save $19 million annually because of the program, and those savings will trickle down to departments where cuts were made.

"It reduces the workforce both in terms of numbers and our overall salary obligations that we have for employees," Cole said. "And it will allow those units to make better decisions about how to use their resources."

While Hogan acknowledges the program's success in saving money, he said there have been costs attributed to those savings.

"You're losing teachers and you're losing workers," Hogan said. "So, that's one reason they do the re-hiring of retirees because you can still save money and get the service performed a little cheaper while you're building of cash reserves that could maybe help you make a permanent hire."

During a meeting Monday with the audit and budget committee, Hogan commented about a recently policy adopted by the U of I's Board of Trustees aimed at limiting tuition increases to no more than the rate of inflation. He said this will leave the university still looking for money for pay raises and won't strengthen the university's financial situation.

The state currently owes the U of I nearly $440 million in unpaid bills.

Categories: Economics, Education

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - March 14, 2011

UI Board of Trustees Chair Not Interested in Running for Office

The chair of the University of Illinois' Board of Trustees, Christopher Kennedy, said he does not have any plans to run for political office.

Kennedy is a son of the late U.S. Senator Robert F. Kennedy, and nephew of former President John F. Kennedy. During a visit Monday to the Urbana campus, Kennedy talked about the importance of using Illinois' connections at the federal level to lobby for more research grants. When asked about his desire to run for office, he said he doesn't envision a future in politics

"I'd say the University is political enough for me," he said. "I have no aspirations beyond the university."

Kennedy currently runs Merchandise Mart Properties in Chicago. He was one of six trustees appointed in September 2009 by Governor Pat Quinn following a university admissions scandal.

The Board of Trustees is slated to meet Wednesday, March 23 in Springfield. The Board bumped up tuition last year by 9.5%, a figure that didn't sit well for some students and parents. While the agenda for that meeting has not been set, Kennedy shed some light on how the board may act if it is confronted with another tuition hike.

"I'd say the board has made it clear that we have no intention of raising tuition beyond inflation," Kennedy said. "Tuition at the University of Illinois will remain constant in real dollars, and we just have to figure out what the inflation rate is."

The board of trustees adopted a policy earlier this year linking tuition increases to other factors, including inflation. The state currently owes the U of I nearly $440 million in unpaid bills.

Kennedy said the university should better position itself to seek out federal research grants that will help retain jobs within the state, and improve Illinois' economy.

Categories: Education, Government, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - March 14, 2011

Sen. Radogno Wants to Do Away with Education Perk

Children of longtime public university employees do not have to pay full tuition if they attend a state school.

As long as a parent has put in at least seven years of service, the children pay half price, but Senate Republican Leader Christine Radogno wants to do away with the perk. Radogno said during difficult financial times, it cannot be justified. She said it is unfair that a nurse working at a university hospital gets the benefit when a nurse at a private hospital does not.

"Even within the university community, it's not even universally applied," Radogno said. "It's applied based on your family status, which generally we try to stay away from that. So, if you happen to have children, you get extra pay."

Radogno said that does not make sense, and she doesn't buy university claims that it is an important recruiting tool.

Schools say that lawmakers have continually looked to higher education to help fill the state's budget hole, and that has already meant reduced benefits for university employees. Illinois State University spokesman Jay Groves said Illinois exports a lot of its high school graduates to neighboring states. He said the perk helps entice employees' children, their partial tuition and fees to stay in Illinois.

"You know she might be assuming that if students did not have that benefit, that they would go to public universities anyway, and that is not a given," Groves said. "So that is money taken away from the public universities if the student decided to go out of state or to a private institution."

If it gains traction in the legislature, Radogno's proposal would only apply to future hires. Current university workers would be grandfathered in and have the chance to keep the tuition break.

Radogno also has legislation that would eliminate full tuition waivers known as General Assembly scholarships. Lawmakers can award them at their discretion, and there have been cases of abuse. Governor Pat Quinn also supports ending that program.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - March 14, 2011

Rep. Collins Picked to Fill Ill. Senate Vacancy

State Rep. Annazette Collins has been picked to fill an Illinois Senate vacancy created by the resignation of a west Chicago lawmaker.

Collins has served in the House since 2000 and chairs the Public Utilities Committee.

Local Democratic leaders picked her Monday for the seat previously held by Rickey Hendon.

Hendon held the seat for 18 years but resigned suddenly last month.

Another applicant for the vacancy was Scott Lee Cohen, the former candidate for governor and lieutenant governor. His political hopes were dashed by the revelation that he had been accused of domestic violence and steroid abuse.

Categories: Government, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - March 14, 2011

U of I Japan House Announces Earthquake Relief Fund

A fund-raising effort has begun at the University of Illinois Urbana campus to help victims of the earthquake and tsunami in Japan.

The university's Japan House, together with the College of Fine and Applied Arts, have launched Illinois Japan Disaster Relief Fund through the University of Illinois Foundation.

Japan House director and Associate Professor of Japanese Art and Culture, Kimiko Gunji, said friends in Japan that she has been able to contact tell her they are all right, following last week's earthquake. But Gunji said she hasn't yet reached anybody in Sendei, one of the areas hardest hit by the quake, and Gunji said her friends in Japan tell her that the earthquake's impact is evident, even in parts of the country relatively unscathed.

Speaking of a friend who lived on the outskirts of Tokyo, Gunji said, "She said her condo shook (for a) long time, and all her china was all broken into pieces. And another friend who lived in Tokyo, told me that when she went to pick up her husband, it took her ten hours, just for the short distance, couldn't move."

Gunji said periodic, severe earthquakes are a fact of life in Japan, once that people prepare for: "especially people living in (the) Tokyo area. My sister lived in the outskirts of Tokyo. Always she had a whole bunch of --- stuff. If something happened, (this) is the stuff that's prepared. Water, and things like that."

But Gunji said last week's quake and tsunami were especially devastating.

Gunji said the private donations sent in for the Illinois Japan Disaster Relief Fund will go directly to support the people of Japan. She said they plan to work with the Japanese Consul General in Chicago, and the Illini Japan Club --- an association of U of I alumni in Japan --- to determine how best to spend the donations.

The College of Fine and Applied Arts has set up a web page for donations to the Illinois Japan Disaster Relief Fund. Donations can also be mailed directly to Japan House or the University of Illinois Foundation. Checks should be made out to UIF/Illinois-Japan Disaster Relief.

Illinois-Japan Disaster Relief Japan House 2000 South Lincoln Avenue-Urbana, Illinois 61802 Phone: 217.244.9934- Email: japanhouse@illinois.edu

University of Illinois Foundation 1305 West Green Street Urbana, IL 61801-2962 Phone: 217.333.0810 Email: uif@uif.uillinois.edu

Prof. Gunji will dedicate a traditional tea ceremony to victims of the recent earthquake and tsunami this weekend. The event is scheduled for Saturday, March 19th at 1 PM at the U of I Japan House, at 2000 S. Lincoln in Urbana. The public is invited, and donations to the relief fund will be accepted at that time.

Categories: Community, Education

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - March 14, 2011

UI Board of Trustees Chair Discusses Economic Importance of University Research

University of Illinois board of trustees chair Christopher Kennedy addresses the U of I community in the Beckman auditorium to discuss the importance of research at the university to the economic development of Illinois and the nation. He explains why advancing efforts to secure new research opportunities will have a positive effect on the economy.

Download mp3 file

AP - Illinois Public Media News - March 13, 2011

Illinois Prepares to Face Former Coach Kruger

Illinois coach Bruce Weber sat at a card table surrounded by reporters Sunday night, getting to know UNLV, the team his Illini will face in the NCAA tournament, as best he could with nothing more than a roster and rundown of wins and losses to work with.

The one thing Weber and the rest of the Illini know for sure, the eighth-seeded Rebels (24-8) are coached by one of the two main men Illini fans sometimes compare Weber to, Lon Kruger.

And if the ninth-seeded Illini (19-13) can get by UNLV Friday in Tulsa, Okla., they might well face the other one, the man Weber replaced, Kansas coach Bill Self.

All of that mattered little Sunday to an Illinois team just relieved to be in the NCAAs for the first time in two years. A year ago, they were stunned by an NCAA snub and trying to muster some enthusiasm for the NIT.

"After what I experienced last year, you never know," said senior Bill Cole, who pointed out that Illinois had to wait for two of the tournament's four regions to be filled before learning it was in. "When the first two regions go by, you're just begging to hear your name called."

The Illini were shocked to be left out of the NCAAs last year, their second tourney miss in three seasons.

And their last trip two years ago, as a No. 5 seed, ended with a first-round upset loss to 12th-seed Western Kentucky, a game that still leaves a bad taste for Illinois' four starting seniors: Cole, Demetri McCamey, Mike Tisdale and Mike Davis.

That 76-72 loss, Davis said Sunday, should hold a lesson for the Illini: Cliche or not, take the tournament one game at a time.

"Back then we saw Western Kentucky and we thought "Aw, we're gonna' win this one,'" he said.

The Illini aren't exactly riding a high as they get ready for UNLV, either.

They lost 60-55 to Michigan in their opener at the Big Ten tournament on Friday after leading by as many as 12 points.

That loss was reminiscent of a string of disappointing and often close losses for Illinois. The Illini opened the season ranked No. 13 and considered a contender for the Big Ten title. They finished in a tie for fourth.

UNLV spent four weeks in the Top 25, but dropped out for good after an up-and-down start in the conference.

The Rebels finished third in the Mountain West and won their last five regular-season games. They knocked off Wisconsin and Kansas State early but lost twice each to the elite of their conference, San Diego State and BYU.

Kruger coached the Illini for four seasons, leaving after the 1999-2000 season to become head coach of the Atlanta Hawks. He took over at UNLV in 2004.

Kruger's Illini went to the NCAA tournament three times in four years, won a Big Ten title in 1997-98 and finished in the Top 25 three times.

At UNLV, he's had similar success, coaching four of his seven teams to the NCAAs, including four of the last five.

The Rebels are led by Tre'Von Willis, who averages 13.5 points a game, and Chace Stanback, who averages 13 points a game and six rebounds.

Sunday night, Weber said he knew Kruger fairly well and faced him while an assistant at Purdue.

"He's a very, very good coach and that team will be well coached and play hard," Weber said.

Beyond that, he said he didn't know yet just what to expect beyond the likelihood that a smaller UNLV team was likely to press and trap.

McCamey said the Illini will need to rely on good defense to counter that strategy.

"If you get stops and get out in transition, they can't press you," McCamey said.

Weber declined to look ahead at a potential matchup with Self and the Southwest top-seed Jayhawks. Kansas opens with Boston University, a 16 seed.

Some fans on Internet message boards and elsewhere over the past couple of seasons have compared Weber unfavorably to Self, sometimes saying Weber's best year, the 2005 run to the NCAA final, was built on players Self recruited.

Tisdale said, while he's focused on UNLV, the idea of beating at least one of his coach's predecessors would add a little extra incentive.

"Everybody's going to be talking about Kansas and Illinois and all this stuff, but our focus right now is UNLV," the 7-foot-1 center said. "We're going to do what we can to win one for our coach.

Categories: Education, Sports

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - March 11, 2011

Carle and Hoopeston Look at Integrating Service

Carle Foundation Hospital and Hoopeston Regional Hospital are mulling over a plan to improve medical services by expanding their affiliation.

Under the proposal, Hoopeston - in addition to all of its primary-care facilities in Hoopeston, Cissna Park, and Rossville - would become an independent operating unit of Carle. Hospital officials say this effort would pave the way for better patient care between the two medical centers, especially with medical records, labs and imaging.

"We don't think people should be disadvantaged because they live in a small town 50 miles away about the health care that's delivered," Carle CEO James Leonard said. "This type of relationship allows that dream to become a reality."

Hoopeston CEO Harry Brockus said by teaming up with the larger Carle hospital, he believes the partnership will make it easier for his medical center to get loans to buy new equipment, bring on more staff, and start up medical departments.

"One of the things that this integration will bring about for us is to be able to work with Carle to access those markets because they're so much larger than us," Brockus said. "Hoopeston Hospital struggled for several years prior to this and only became financially solvent within the past two years."

Carle providers have teamed with Hoopeston Regional Center since November 2009 in areas including cardiology, psychiatry, and surgery. Carle previously loaned Hoopeston Regional Hospital $4 million to expand its emergency room and surgical area...that project is expected to start in April.

In order for this latest partnership to be finalized, board members from both hospitals and the Illinois Health Facilities and Service Review Board have to approve the agreement. If all approvals are met, then by October 2012, Hoopeston's hospital and clinics would be part of Urbana's Carle system.

Categories: Business, Health

Page 523 of 712 pages ‹ First  < 521 522 523 524 525 >  Last ›