Illinois Public Media News

AP - Illinois Public Media News - September 01, 2009

More Details on UIUC Senate Postponment of Vote on White, Herman

It will be two more weeks before the Academic Senate at the University of Illinois's Urbana campus votes on a resolution calling for changes in leadership.

The body made up of 200 faculty and 50 students met in closed session for about an hour Monday to consider an advisory resolution aimed at Urbana Chancellor Richard Herman and President Joseph White - calling for them to step down in the wake of the U of I admissions scandal. Then the panel voted 91 to 66 to postpone the vote to September 14th.

Before Senators considered the resolution... both administrators addressed the standing-room only crowd. Chancellor Herman again apologized for his role in improper admissions, saying he realized that people were in 'genuine pain' as a result of clout's involvement.

"I still believe", said Herman, "that for the hundreds of inquiries from well-connected people over many years, only a small percentage ended up being mishandled. But even one case is too many."

Herman said he considered resigning... but believes his accomplishments should outweigh the mistakes.

Meanwhile, White told the faculty-student body that said he was unaware of the Category I list of politically connected applicants until news reports of about the list first surfaced:

"I assure you that had I known about these practices, I would have challenged them", White said.

Both White and Herman say they want to stay in their jobs to help guide reforms of the admissions process.

Senate Executive Committee Chair Joyce Tolliver says now the Senators can take their time to discuss the resolution with fellow faculty and students, most of whom have just returned to campus. But Tolliver points out a new U of I Board of Trustees could take action on the administrators ---- before the Senate meets again. Governor Pat Quinn still has to fill five vacancies on the Board prior to a September 10th trustees meeting in Urbana.

Categories: Education

AP - Illinois Public Media News - September 01, 2009

UIUC Senate Wants Bigger Role for Faculty in Choosing U of I Trustees

The faculty-student Senate at the University of Illinois Urbana campus is calling on Governor Pat Quinn to create a task force to advise him on selecting new members of the U of I Board of Trustees. A resolution passed by the Academic Senate Monday also recommends that chairs of the Senates at each campus be among the members of the panel. It also calls for the eventual appointment of faculty to the U of I Board itself.

Business professor and Academic Senator Mark Roszkowski says having faculty representation at the top level of university governance would ensure real shared governance between the university's administration and its faculty. "So I think this vaults the (Academic) Senate into its proper position as the protectors of the academic mission of the university", he added.

Roszkowski says if faculty serve as U of I trustees, they might have to recuse themselves from voting on certain matters to avoid conflicts of interest, as student trustees now do. But he says that even in those cases, a faculty voice during board discussions would be good for the university.

Roszkowski says a delegation from the Academic Senate is to meet with Governor Quinn on the proposal, before he appoints any additional trustees. Quinn has said he plans to appoint more trustees on Friday.

Passage of the resolution on faculty participation in choosing and serving as trustees came at the same meeting where senators agreed to postpone a vote on a resolution recommending that U of I President B. Joseph White and Urbana Chancellor Richard Herman step down.

Categories: Education, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 31, 2009

U of I Urbana Academic Senate Delays Vote on White and Herman

The faculty-student Senate at the University of Illinois' Urbana campus voted 91 to 66 Monday to postpone for two weeks a vote on an advisory resolution calling for President Joseph White and Chancellor Richard Herman to step down --- due to the admissions scandal.

The delay means the Senate won't take up the non-binding resolution until September 14th --- four days after the U of I Board of Trustees' scheduled September 10th meeting, when trustees might discuss the issue themselves.

The postponement was sought by Joyce Tolliver, chair of the Executive Committee which approved the resolution last week. Tolliver's move to postpone the vote was rejected by a boisterous voice vote at the start of the meeting, but was accepted after a lengthy discussion in closed session.

"By the time we come back in two weeks, we're not rushed", explained Tolliver. "We don't have to hammer out some of the details and ambiguities on the floor."

Both White and Herman spoke to the Senate Monday afternoon to argue for staying on, so they can reform the admissions process.

White told the Urbana campus Academic Senate that he had no knowledge at the time that there was a "Category I" list of under qualified applicants backed by trustees, politicians and others --- he says he would have challenged it if he had known.

Herman said he had come to realize the pain he had caused to citizens, students and parents by his role in the admissions scandal, and had considered resigning. But he told the Faculty-Student that he wanted the opportunity to help build a firewall to protect the university admissions process from future political pressure.

NOTE: This story has been revised and updated.

Categories: Education

AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 31, 2009

Illinois Records First Human West Nile Case This Year

Health officials say a 50-something person in southwestern Illinois is the state's first human case of West Nile virus for 2009.

The Illinois Department of Public Health says the St. Clair County Health Department reported the case recently. Last year, there were 20 human cases of the mosquito-borne virus statewide, with one death.

Public Health Director Damon Arnold says cooler temperatures this summer have blunted the frequency of the virus, but he says Illinois' first human case should remind residents that the threat remains.

So far this year, two dozen Illinois counties have reported mosquito batches or birds testing positive for the virus.

Only about 20 percent of people bitten by an infected mosquito will get sick. The illness is usually mild but can be serious or fatal.

Categories: Health
Tags: health

AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 31, 2009

Tax Goes Up Tuesday on Some Candy. Liquor, Toiletries

Illinois consumers will pay more for toiletries, candy, soft drinks and liquor starting Tuesday as lawmakers raise cash to pay for a statewide construction program.

Most candy _ currently carrying a 1 percent sales tax _ will be taxed at 6.25 percent. And it'll be the same for shampoos and toothpastes that until now were considered "medicated.''

Bottled soft drinks with added sweetener or flavoring, such as iced tea, will be taxed more. And liquor distributors will pay more for alcohol. In many cases, the cost will be passed on to consumers.

All told, the changes should raise about $150 million a year toward a $30 billion roads-and-schools building plan. The program also includes hundreds of millions of dollars for local pet projects of lawmakers.

Categories: Economics, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 27, 2009

Suspected H1N1 Flu Cases Turning Up Among U of I Students

Health officials in Champaign County saw only a handful of H1N1 or swine flu cases over the summer. But now that students are back at the University of Illinois Urbana campus, they're bringing a steady flow of suspected flu cases with them.

Dr. Robert Palinkas, director of the McKinley Health Center on campus, says suspected H1N1 cases have been coming in at the rate of 5 or 6 a day. He says most of the students are sent home to their parents, where they can be relatively isolated until they are no longer contagious. But for those who can't go home --- or who already live in the area --- Palinkas says they've been finding ways to keep infected students away from other people as much as possible.

"Sometimes, it means having a roommate change a room", says Palinkas. "Sometimes, it means a housing entity --- not necessarily University Housing --- find temporary accomodations for five to seven days. So far, each of those arrangements has been, really, pretty successful."

There is no definitive diagnosis of H1N1 flu virus in most of these cases, because state officials are limiting how many cases they test. McKinley Health Center doctors are basing their diagnosis on a rapid flu test plus their own clinical judgment.

Palinkas says he expects suspected H1N1 flu cases to continue among U of I students --- and even increase, as the virus spreads throughout the campus. He says common-sense prevention methods can limit the flu's increase. Those methods include frequent handwashing, covering coughs with a sleeve, and not sharing materials from one mouth to another.

Categories: Education, Health

AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 27, 2009

UI Senate Leaders Call For White, Herman to be Replaced

Leaders of the University of Illinois' faculty want the school's president and the chancellor of its flagship campus replaced in the wake of an admissions scandal.

But the faculty's Senate Executive committee said Thursday that it would be best if President Joseph White and Chancellor Richard Herman don't get fired or quit immediately.

Faculty leaders instead called for an "orderly transition'' to new leadership. They didn't recommend a timeline.

White has said they won't step down. And in a statement this morning, Herman said he'll remain in his job as long as possible.

The two answer to the university's board of trustees. Some members say they plan to start reviewing the two school leaders' performance.

Categories: Education, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 27, 2009

Wanted: Someone to Run a Closed State Park Resort

The state of Illinois has another lodging facility on its hands, and it's trying to find a buyer.

The state already owns one hotel in which it had invested money, and last year it unloaded a second. The latest possession is a property on state park land. The firm that held the concession for the Eagle Creek Resort and Conference Center near Shelbyville had fallen into receivership, and last month the receiver asked that it be closed. Today the state began asking for bids to revive the sprawling resort.

Tom Flattery is a planner with the state Department of Natural Resources. He says the closure has come at a bad time for the resort industry, so finding an operator may be tough.

Flattery says the Eagle Creek Resort had deteriorated over time, so he estimates that it could take 1.5 million dollars to restore it. In the meantime, the DNR is keeping the resort mothballed, spending about 50 thousand dollars a year to provide security and maintain the 18-hole golf course.

Bids for running the resort are due by mid-November.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - August 27, 2009

WILL Connect: The Economy, Tracking New Directions for Displaced Workers

In central Illinois, many employers large and small have downsized or closed altogether, forcing thousands of laid-off workers to consider new options. In our latest report as part of our outreach project "WILL Connect: The Economy", AM 580's Jeff Bossert looks at the retraining of workers. Ingenuity and government-funded training are giving many of them a jump on a new career, or a better shot at an old one:

Download mp3 file

AP - Illinois Public Media News - August 27, 2009

Quinn Appoints Two New U of I Trustees, Lets Two Others Stay

Governor Pat Quinn has started making fresh appointments to the University of Illinois Board of Trustees.

That's after most members resigned in the wake of an admissions scandal.

Quinn says he wants to replace the seven trustees who've resigned in the next week and a-half.

On Wednesday, he announced two new appointments: those of Merchandise Mart CEO Chris Kennedy, and Lawrence Oliver, an attorney for the Boeing Company.

Quinn says the board's first item of business will be dealing with U of I President B. Joseph White and Urbana Campus Chancellor Richard Herman, who were key players in the scandal.

"I think they have a lot of explainin' to do", says Quinn. "But I don't want to prejudge things until the full board that I appoint has an opportunity to review this report, listen to the various individuals involved, and come to a reasoned decision."

The report issued by a state panel recommended all nine trustees step down.

Two trustees, Frances Carroll and James Montgomery, have refused... But Quinn says he's allowing them to stay on to avoid a protracted legal fight.

"You can be as legalistic as you want," explained the governor. "I do not think that having a legal battle with two trustees who refuse to resign is the central focus of our work."

Quinn says that would be a "sideshow" that could detract from the U of I's fundraising and faculty recruiting.

Trustee Montgomery congratulated Quinn for not firing him. But Quinn was criticized by others for his handling of the situation.

Illinois Senate Republican leader Christine Radogno said the situation was still unresolved because some trustees were staying on.

Quinn's Democratic primary challenger, Illinois Comptroller Dan Hynes, accused the governor of failing to lead.

The governor says, in the next week or so, he plans to finish appointing replacements for trustees who've already offered to step down.

--- Additional reporting from The Associated Press

Categories: Education, Government, Politics

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