Illinois Public Media News

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 21, 2011

Neither Side Budging in Wisconsin Union Fight

No resolution appeared imminent Monday to the stalemate over union rights in Wisconsin, leaving Senate Republicans resigned to forge ahead with less-controversial business such as tax breaks for dairy farmers and commending the Green Bay Packers on winning the Super Bowl.

As the standoff entered its second week, none of the major players offered any signs of backing down in a high-stakes game of political chicken that has riveted the nation and led to ongoing public protests that drew a high of 68,000 people on Saturday. Thousands more braved cold winds and temperatures in the 20s to march again on Monday, waving signs that said "Stop the attack on Wisconsin families" and "solidarity."

The 14 Senate Democrats who skipped town Thursday to indefinitely delay a vote on Republican Gov. Scott Walker's bill stripping most collective bargaining rights from nearly all public employees remained missing in action for a fifth day.

"You have shut down the people's government, and that is not acceptable," Republican Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald said during a brief meeting Monday setting the agenda for Tuesday's Senate session.

Two of the missing Democrats participated by phone from an undisclosed location.

"You're not in negotiations. There is no negotiation," Fitzgerald said, cutting off one of the Democrats on the phone. "You need to get back to the floor of the Senate and offer any ideas you may have on final passage. That's where we're at. There is no negotiation."

Both the Senate and Assembly planned to be in session on Tuesday to take up the bill, but at least one of the missing Democrats needed to show up for a vote to be taken in the Senate. Assembly Democrats planned to offer dozens of amendments that could push a vote into Wednesday or later.

Although Tuesday's list of items, including the resolution honoring the Packers, is largely bipartisan, Fitzgerald hinted that he might try to push some more controversial ones later, even if the Democrats aren't back. Among the possibilities is a vote on the question of whether voters should be required to show identification at the polls.

The Democratic senators taking part in the scheduling meeting urged Republicans to accept the offer made by the unions under which they would accept paying more for benefits as Walker wants but still retain their collective bargaining rights.

Another compromise offered by Republican Sen. Dale Schultz would remove collective bargaining rights just for two years

"It's time for all of us to move forward," said Democratic Sen. Dave Hansen of Green Bay over the phone to the Republicans.

Walker has rejected both offers, saying local governments and school districts can't be hamstrung by the often lengthy collective bargaining process and need to have more flexibility to deal with up to $1 billion in cuts he will propose in his budget next week and into the future.

"It will never get to me because other than that one state senator, all the rest of the Republicans are firmly behind our proposal," Walker said in an MSNBC interview on Monday, calling it an unacceptable short-term fix.

The emergency plan he wants the Legislature to pass would address this year's $137 million shortfall and start dealing with the $3.6 billion hole expected by mid-2013. The benefits concessions would amount to $30 million this year, but the largest savings Walker proposed comes from refinancing debt to save $165 million.

That portion must be done by Friday for bonds to be refinanced in time to realize the savings by June 30, the end of this fiscal year.

Walker said not passing the bill by Friday would make even deeper cuts necessary and possibly result in laying off 1,500 workers over the next four months.

Thousands of those affected and their supporters marched on the Capitol for a seventh straight day. Hundreds of them have been sleeping in the rotunda every night and several districts have had to close after so many teachers called in sick. The Madison School District was closed Wednesday through Monday but was expected to reopen Tuesday.

Districts in central Wisconsin were also closed Monday, but that was because of 10 to 12 inches of snow. Milwaukee schools were shut down for a pre-scheduled midsemester break. Those closures, on top of Monday being a previously scheduled furlough day for state workers, resulted in another large crowd Monday but an official estimate was not yet released.

At noon, guitarist Tom Morello of Rage Against the Machine took to a stage on the Capitol steps to fire up the crowd. He said he flew in from California to lend his voice to the protest.

"The future of workers' rights will be decided in Madison, Wisconsin," he said. "You're making history here."

He joked that he could hardly play the guitar because his fingers were numb. He sang a song with the refrain, "For the union men and women standing up and standing strong!" Each time he repeated that lyric, the crowd roared.

Walker's plan would allow unions representing most public employees to negotiate only for wage increases, not benefits or working conditions. Any wage increase above the Consumer Price Index would have to be approved in a referendum. Unions would face a vote of membership every year to stay formed, and workers could opt out of paying dues.

The plan would also require many public employees to cut their take home pay by about 8 percent by contributing more of their salaries toward their health insurance and retirement benefits, concessions the unions have said they're willing to accept.

But Walker and Republicans are showing no willingness to budge while the Senate Democrats say they are prepared to stay away for weeks if that's what it will take.

Categories: Economics, Government, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 21, 2011

Danville Voters to Reduce Field of Mayoral Candidates from Five to Four

Four of the five candidates running in Tuesday's Danville mayoral primary will advance to the general election in April.

Incumbent Mayor Scott Eisenhauer is running for a third term in Danville, against four challengers -- Vermilion County Board Chairman James "Mouse" McMahon, restaurant owner David Quick, truck driver Donald Nord and Alderman Rickey Williams Junior. Only Eisenhauer, McMahon and Quick have their names on the ballot -- Nord and Williams are running write-in campaigns. But Director Barbara Dreher of the Danville Election Commission said all of them have a chance to be among the final four candidates on the April 5th general election ballot.

"The top four vote-getters out of this election, be they write-ins or the names printed on the ballot ... will be printed on the ballot in April," Dreher explained.

That means at least one of the two write-in candidates will see his name printed on the April ballot. Dreher said it is too late to file to run as a write-in candidate for Danville mayor in the April 5th race.

Eisenhauer had no primary challengers in 2007, but he was among a field of nine candidates in the 2003 Danville mayoral primary. Dreher said that primary attracted about 6,000 voters, but she expects a lighter turnout for this year's primary. However, Dreher anticipates turnout to be heavier in the April election.

Dreher said she has received about 260 early ballots for Tuesday's primary, but a few more could still be in the mail.

Categories: Politics
Tags: politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - February 21, 2011

Ind. Union Members Gather to Protest Labor Bill

A contentious labor bill that is drawing hundreds of protesting union members to the Indiana Statehouse has cleared a Republican-led House committee.

The House Labor Committee voted 8-5 along party lines Monday to advance the so-called right-to-work legislation, which prohibits union membership and fees from being a condition of employment.

Backers argue the bill would remove an impediment to business in the state, while opponents say such laws drive down wages by weakening unions.

The bill is so controversial that Republican Gov. Mitch Daniels has said he would prefer that legislators focus on other issues for fear that the proposal could wreck the political chances of other more important bills.

The right-to-work bill now moves to the full Republican-led House for consideration.

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - February 21, 2011

Blagojevich Attorneys Want to Block All Recordings in Retrial

Attorneys for Rod Blagojevich are asking the judge in his upcoming corruption retrial to throw out all secret recordings of the former Illinois governor.

In a new court filing, Blagojevich's attorneys ask that all secretly recorded conversations the FBI has of Blagojevich or his aides not be played in court.

Blagojevich is accused of trying to personally profit by appointing someone to Barack Obama's former senate seat.

That would mean jurors wouldn't hear Blagojevich say, "I've got this thing, and it's (expletive deleted) golden."

Or they wouldn't hear Blagojevich tell his wife, "I'd like a four-year contract for a million a year, or something. Or 750. Whatever. It'd have to be good."

Or any other of the hundreds of hours of tapes the FBI has on Blagojevich.

Defense attorneys say in their court filing they weren't given a fair chance to play the tapes they wanted to play in the first trial - so it's only fair if no tapes are played. The defense argues there are some gaps in parts of the tapes that could be misleading.

The trial is scheduled to begin in April.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - February 21, 2011

Election Monitors Assigned for Tuesday’s Vote

Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan says she will have a team of 150 investigators monitoring Tuesday's elections statewide.

Madigan said Monday that the goal is to make sure polling places are accessible and voting rights are protected. On Sunday, Cook County State's Attorney Anita Alvarez says there will be "zero tolerance'' for any illegal election activity. She said 200 assistant state's attorneys will be assigned to election duty in all of Chicago's wards.

Madigan says voters should report any suspected improper or illegal election activities. She reminded voters that they have the right to vote if they are in line when polls close at 7 p.m. She also says voters can receive replacement ballots if they've made a mistake before they cast their vote.

Categories: Government, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 18, 2011

Library Systems Merger Plan Leaves Several Questions Unanswered

The head of one of Central Illinois library system says the merger for all state library groups planned for July 1 leaves mostly unanswered questions at this point.

Beverly Obert is Executive Director of the Decatur-based Rolling Prairie Library System, which covers all or part of 12 counties just to the west of the Champaign-based Lincoln Trail system. Obert said the only thing for certain is many jobs will be lost when nine Illinois library systems combine into just two, and her office is no exception.

"Because as we consolidate we will not need four directors, four fiscal agents, four whatever, whatever," Obert said. "There will be some reductions in staff. That is going to be difficult, because some people will lose their jobs. We do not know yet who those people will be. We are hoping to have a better idea of that so we can tell staff exactly what's going to happen by April 1st."

Obert said asking all staff to re-apply for jobs will be the only fair way to handle the merger, and said said it is also unclear whether her office will close. But Obert said she expects no break in services to member libraries in July.

"They will still have their automated catologues where they can borrow from, and there will still be delivery systems that will move materials between libraries," she said. "Those were the two key things that most of the libraries really depend upon. Those will be in place July 1. What we may not have in place and available for them are things like continuing education and consulting."

Meanwhile, the director of one of the smaller libraries in the Lincoln Trail Libraries System says the merger could serve as an advantage. Tolono Library Director Janet Cler said having a smaller staff will enable the two library systems to better coordinate their services.

Categories: Economics, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - February 18, 2011

Litigation Over Airport Expansion Delayed Again

There's another delay in litigation over O'Hare International Airport expansion that pits United and American airlines against the city of Chicago.

A statement Friday from United Airlines and American says a new five-day delay will give the parties more time to resolve their differences over the financing and timing of construction of new runways and other improvements at O'Hare.

It says the latest delay comes at the request of U.S. Department of Transportation. The agency has been trying to mediate an agreement.

On Thursday, the sides asked a judge to lift a one-week delay on hearing the airlines' lawsuit that opposes the issuing of bonds for the expansion.

Mayor Richard Daley has accused the airlines of reneging on their promise in 2001 to help see through the overhaul of O'Hare.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 18, 2011

Democrats in Ill. Welcome Wisc. Lawmakers

(With additional reporting from NPR, Illinois Public Radio, The Associated Press)

Fourteen Democratic state lawmakers from Wisconsin are hiding in Illinois to avoid a vote on a controversial bill that would strip some public workers in their state of collective bargaining rights.

Democrats who fled Wisconsin to block a vote on the sweeping anti-union bill could stay in hiding for days or even weeks. The bill has drawn thousands of protesters to the state Capitol in Madison, Wis. Republican leaders said they expected Wisconsin residents would be pleased with the savings the bill would achieve - $30 million by July 1 and $300 million over the next two years.

Republicans hold 19 Senate seats but are one vote short of the 20 votes necessary to conduct business. The anti-union measure needs 17 votes to pass.

State Sen. Jon Erpenback (D-Middleton), who was among those who fled, said Friday that the group was prepared to be away for weeks, although he would like the standoff to end as soon as possible.

"This was an extreme action, but the legislation, we feel, was much more extreme," Erpenbach said.

Illinois Senate President John Cullerton praised his fellow Democrats from north of the border for delaying the vote, which would almost certainly pass the state's heavily-Republican legislature. Meanwhile, Illinois Governor Pat Quinn had a warm welcome for the political refugees.

"We want to assure the people of Wisconsin that we're their friends," Quinn said. "We're always available here in Illinois if they'd like to visit and stay a while until (Gov. Walker) comes to his senses."

Wisconsin's Republican Governor Scott Walker said the Democrats should return to Madison and face the vote.

"The state senators who are hiding out down in Illinois should show up for work, have their say, have their vote, add their amendments," Walker told CBS' The Early Show on Friday. "But in the end, we've got a $3.6 billion budget deficit we've got to balance."

Although Walker called the Democrats' flight a stunt, many protesters at the Capitol saw it differently. School guidance counselor Saunnie Yelton-Stanley called their disappearance "brilliant."

"The fact that the Democrats have walked out, it shows they're listening to us," said Neil Graupner, a 19-year-old technical college student from Madison, as he prepared to spend the night at the Capitol on Thursday.

Erpenbach said he is meeting with the other refugee Democrats to decide what to do next - though he's not sure how long they will remain on the lam.

I mean I wish I was home tonight in my own bed," he said. "It's Friday night in Wisconsin that's fish fry night. You now, I really wish I was back home. So hopefully we'll get back home soon, but in the mean time, this is up to the governor.

Categories: Economics, Government, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 17, 2011

Kids Count Study Shows Childhood Poverty on the Rise in Champaign County

Amid the highs and lows of Illinois' uncertain economy, a new report says Champaign County has followed a decade-long trend of increased childhood poverty.

The "Great at Eight" report, released by Voices for Illinois Children, focused on the resources children up until the age of eight need to succeed. The report's authors say at this age "children should be ready to shift from learning to read to reading to learn."

The study finds from 1999-2000, the childhood poverty rate in Champaign County was 14.3 percent, slightly below the statewide average of 14.8 percent. In 2008-2009, the county's child poverty rate went up to 18.9 percent, compared with 17.8 percent statewide.

Meanwhile, math and reading scores for 3rd graders on the Illinois Standards Achievement Test in Urbana and Champaign Schools last year were below the state average.

The authors of the report say the state fiscal crisis threatens an array of services, including early childhood education, mental health care, and family support. Beverley Baker, the director of Community Impact with the United Way of Champaign County, said she agrees that programs critical to a child's development are at risk, which is why she said state funding is making it more difficult to rely on Illinois for support.

"Each local community is going to have to look inward," she said. "There's no way we can replace what the state government does, but I think we're going to have to be creative, and we're going to have to pool our local resources to see what we can do."

The report acknowledges that there will likely be more spending cuts, as the recent income tax increase is not enough to close Illinois' budget gap.

In the last year, low-income students represented more than half of the enrollment at Champaign Unit 4 and Urbana School District 116. Unit 4 School board member Sue Gray said the school district is looking to trim up to $2 million from its $100 million budget, a task she said will not be taken lightly.

The School Board plans to hold a public meeting Tuesday, February 22 at 6pm at the Mellon Building in Champaign to seek community input on how to make those cuts.

(Graphic courtesy of Voices for Illinois Children)


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 17, 2011

Old, Unsafe Ammo Wanted for Disposal in Douglas County

The Douglas County Sheriff's Department is looking for your old or unsafe ammunition. They are holding an ammo disposal event this weekend in Tuscola, and offering to safely dispose of any ammunition that you no longer want, or is too old to use.

Chief Deputy Peter Buckley said they have made arrangements with the Explosives Ordinance Disposal unit of the University of Illinois Police, for the safe disposal of any ammunition that's brought into the center.

"They have some experts in the field of recovering unused ammunition and the proper disposal of that, and they've agreed to assist us," Buckley said.

Buckley said the ammo disposal event will be taking pistol and rifle rounds, shotgun shells, old black powder, shot shell primers and reloading supplies. He said if you have a device with a blasting cap or some other ordinance, you should call ahead before bringing it in. You don't have to be a Douglas County resident to drop off ammo, and you don't have to have an FOID card.

The disposal event runs Friday through Sunday, February 18-20, from 8 AM to 9 PM, at the Douglas County Sheriff's Office, at 920 South Washington in Tuscola.

Categories: Government, Politics
Tags: government

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