Illinois Public Media News

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 01, 2011

UI Classes Canceled for Wednesday, County Road Crews Stop Plowing

For only the third time in 30-plus years, the University of Illinois has canceled classes on the Urbana campus.

The decision Tuesday night for the Wednesday class schedule comes amid a severe winter storm that has dropped several inches of sleet and snow on east-central Illinois by late Tuesday evening. Wind and visibility conditions have deteriorated in rural parts of Champaign County enough for the Emergency Operations Center to pull county highway crews off rural roadways starting at 11pm. EOC spokesman Rick Atterbury said plowing should resume at daybreak.

Even though U of I classes are canceled for Wednesday, the University says the campus will remain officially open. Employees who don't know whether they should report to work should consult their supervisor or University policy on essential employees.

Categories: Education

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 01, 2011

Political Turmoil Leaves Egypt in Unrest

The political turmoil in Egypt has brought between 250,000 and two million people taking to the streets in protest. The country's leader, President Hosni Mubarak, has promised not to run for re-election after his term ends in September. But University of Illinois professor Aladdin Elaasar predicted Mubarak's downfall back in 2009 in his book "The Last Pharaoh: Mubarak and the Uncertain Future of Egypt in the Obama Age." Elaasar spoke with Illinois Public Media's Sean Powers about the future of Egypt.

(Photo by Sean Powers/WILL)

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WILL - Illinois Public Media News - February 01, 2011

UI Officials Seek An Additional $700K for Wind Turbine

Plans for a wind turbine on the University of Illinois' Urbana campus could be in jeopardy if a funding plan isn't in place by Monday.

U of I Sustainability Coordinator Morgan Johnston said it needs to be set by then to place the item on the March agenda for the university's Board of Trustees. She said without that notice, bids for the project will expire, and a $2-million grant from the Illinois Clean Energy Foundation could also be lost. The U of I is seeking an additional $700,000 for the project, a cost Johnston said the U of I's Student Sustainability can handle. The proposed $4-point-5 million project now exceeds $5-million.

"They do have funds available right now that they're allocating for which projects to spend that money on this year," Johnston said. "What we're asking is that they would, rather than support new projects and additional projects, commit that $700,000 to this project to make it to be able to move forward."

Johnston said the U of I will provide more detail later this week on why it's seeking the additional funding.

Urbana City Council member Eric Jakobsson has been an advocate of the wind turbine project, but says he can't support the additional cost.

"It's all, in a certain sense, public money," Jakobsson said. "So the heart of my question was, how do you justify spending public money in a manner that is cost ineffective, especially when everybody is being either to pay more taxes or to tighten their belts?"

The Student Sustainability Committee is already putting half a million dollars into the project. Amy Allen, President of Students for Environmental Concerns, said that should be the limit.

"They've met their commitment to this project," she said. "We want to work with the University to get this done, but it's their responsibility to find that money."

Members with the student committee are requesting a meeting with the U of I's President and Urbana Chancellor about the turbine cost, including items that they don't think should be included in the project.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - February 01, 2011

Ilini to Play Despite Winter Storm

The University of Illinois has never postponed a home basketball game for the weather, and that record will remain intact despite the latest winter storm.

Penn State's basketball team arrived in Champaign by bus early Tuesday afternoon, clearing the way for the Tuesday night game to be played as scheduled.

A massive winter storm moving across the Midwest was already affecting central Illinois, and more than a foot of snow was possible by Wednesday.

Categories: Education, Sports

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - January 31, 2011

Ill. Gov. Quinn Signs Historic Civil Unions Legislation

Civil unions for gay and lesbian couples are now the law of the land in Illinois.

About a thousand people crowded into the Chicago Cultural Center on Monday afternoon to watch Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn sign the historic law. The state's General Assembly approved the legislation 61-52 in the House and 32-24 in the Senate.

"We believe in civil rights and we believe in civil unions," Quinn said before signing the bill.

"Illinois is taking an historic step forward in embracing fairness and extending basic dignity to all couples in our state," John Knight, director of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender Project of the ACLU of Illinois, said in a written statement issued hours before the bill-signing.

The law, which takes effect June 1, gives gay and lesbian couples official recognition from the state and many of the rights that accompany traditional marriage, including the power to decide medical treatment for an ailing partner and the right to inherit a partner's property.

Five states already allow civil unions or their equivalent, according to the Human Rights Campaign. Five other states and Washington, D.C., let gay couples marry outright, as do some countries, including Canada, South Africa and the Netherlands.

Illinois law will continue to limit marriage to one man and one woman, and civil unions still are not recognized by the federal government.

Opponents argue the law could increase the cost of doing business in Illinois, while Quinn has said it will make the state more hospitable to businesses and convention planners.

The legislation, sent to Quinn in December, passed 61-52 in the Illinois House and 32-24 in the Senate.

Some hope civil unions are a step toward full marriage for gay and lesbian couples, although sponsors of the civil union bill have said they don't plan to push for legalizing same-sex marriages, which have limited support in the Legislature.

Curt McKay served from 1998-2008 as the first full-time director of the University of Illinois' Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Resource Center. McKay said the legislation is a huge victory, but he added that there is still more that can be done to provide equal opportunities for LGBT groups.

"A number of the opponents of civil unions in Illinois use as their reason for being opposed that the next thing we'll ask for is same sex marriage," McKay said. "I think providing for LGBT people full inclusion under the laws of the state of Illinois in terms of being equal in every way a straight person is accepted is the final goal."

Some conservative groups said the new law is a stepping stone toward legalized same-sex marriage.

"Marriage was not created by man or governments," David E. Smith, executive director of the Illinois Family Institute, said Monday. "It is an institution created by God. Governments merely recognize its nature and importance

Cardinal Francis George and other Catholic leaders also vigorously fought passage of the law. The measure doesn't require churches to recognize civil unions or perform any kind of ceremony, but critics fear it will lead to other requirements, such as including same-sex couples in adoption programs run by religious groups or granting benefits to employees' partners.

(With additional reporting from the Associated Press)


AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 31, 2011

Quinn Expected to Sign Civil Unions Into Law

Illinois Governor Pat Quinn today is expected to sign a bill that legalizes civil unions. About 1,000 people are expected to be on hand for the ceremony at the Chicago Cultural Center.

Illinois legislators approved civil unions late last year. The bill would allow same sex couples hospital visitation rights and the ability to share insurance policies. State Rep. Greg Harris was instrumental in getting the bill passed.

"This is a huge moment for people in Illinois and people feel that they have a lot of their future invested in this," Harris said.

But David Kelly, with the Illinois Family Institute, said he opposes the legislation. He said civil unions could lead to the state allowing gay marriage.

"Marriage always will be the union of one man and one woman," Kelly said.

Gov. Pat Quinn calls the legislation a civil rights issue. Once signed, the measure will go into effect June 1st.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - January 28, 2011

Postal Service to Conduct Consolidation Study of Champaign Facility

Post offices across the country are facing cuts to make up for an $8.5 billion loss in revenue, and Champaign is no exception.

The U.S. Postal Service has experienced a 20 percent decline in mail volume since 2007, which it attributes to an uptick in e-mails and online payments. It plans to start a three-month review, known as an Area Mail Processing (AMP) study, looking at operations at the Champaign Processing and Distribution Facility on North Mattis Avenue. Postal Service spokesman José Aguilar said a decision will be made in a few months on whether to move the facility's stamp cancellation services to Springfield and Bloomington.

"Right now we're looking at every operation we can to save on fuel, save on work hours, set ourselves up, so that the machinery is running at its optimal capacity," Aguilar said.

The post office employs 205 people, and Aguilar said there is a possibility that a portion of those employees could be re-located or lose their jobs. However, he noted that there are several vacant positions at the Champaign facility, and he said there could be opportunities for displaced workers to fill those jobs. After the review is complete, the U.S. Postal Service will gather input from employees and customers before making a decision.

Categories: Business, Economics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - January 28, 2011

IGPA Director Emeritus Samuel K. Gove Dies at 87

The director emeritus of the University of Illinois' Institute for Government and Public Affairs is being remembered as a soft-spoken individual with a passion for government and public service.

Samuel Gove passed away died in Urbana Friday after a short illness. He was 87. Gove was with IGPA from 1950 until 1985, but was also active in government, serving on transition teams for Governors Dan Walker and Jim Edgar.

Former legislator and comptroller Dawn Clark Netsch served with Gove on the board of Illinois Issues magazine, which he founded. She said civic education for young people was really important to Gove.

"He was very determined and very insistent on that - and never forgot it, always kept coming back to it," Netsch said. "So that was another part of his character. He had not only a strong sense of what government should be, but a strong sense of how young people should be bred into it, if you will."

Netsch said Gove expressed his opinion in a quiet way.

"He was not a bombastic, flamboyant, in-your-face kind of a personality," she said. "But he had strong views on some things, and he certainly had very strong ways of expressing those."

Gove also conducted 17 statewide assemblies, one of them, in 1962, set issues for the 1970 Constitutional Convention. Robert Rich, the current director of IGPA, said Gove was "Mr. Illinois.'

No visitation or funeral services are planned. A celebration of Gove's life will be planned for a later date.

Categories: Education, Government, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - January 28, 2011

Volunteers Count Homeless Population in Champaign County

Every two years during the last week of January, communities across the country try to answer a difficult question: How many people are living without permanent shelter? This point in time survey is the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development's effort to determine the number of homeless people nationwide and understand more about their characteristics. CU-CitizenAccess reporter Dan Petrella went along on this year's count in Champaign-Urbana.

(Photo by Acton Gorton/CU-CitizenAccess)

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WILL - Illinois Public Media News - January 28, 2011

Winter War Gaming Convention Opens in Champaign

More than 400 gamers from east-central Illinois and across the country are expected to attend the 38th annual Winter War Gaming Convention during the January 28-30 weekend at the Hawthorne Suites in Champaign.

Convention Chairman Don McKinney said the Winter War convention is the longest continuously running convention in the Midwest devoted to adventure gaming, as compared to video games.

"This is old-school, table-top, face-to-face gaming," McKinney explained. "Board games where your opponent is sitting across the table from you. Some of them have been computerized, but we're planning the table-top, board game style here.

McKinney said gaming events at Winter War 38 also involve play with painted figures and battlefield simulation. There are also events where games where players who usually compete over the Internet such as Forgotten Realms and Pathfinder Society can engage with players in person.

Winter War was started by students at the U of I Urbana campus in the 1970s, and was held on campus for several years. McKinney said as the convention grew, it moved to now defunct Chancellor Hotel, before moving to its present home at the Hawthorn Suites. McKinney said what was once an event for students now attracts players of all ages --- he notes that both he and his college-age son will be playing.

Winter War 38 runs day and night, through Sunday afternoon, January 30.

Categories: Biography, Recreation

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