Illinois Public Media News

AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 08, 2009

Champaign County Board Hearings Planned in February on Cutting Size of County Board

The Champaign County Board will hold hearings in February to consider a possible reduction in the number of its members.

The County Board has 27 members. But Policy Committee Chairman Tom Betz says it would run more efficiently with maybe only half or two-thirds that number. The Urbana Democrat says the two political parties have trouble finding a full slate of candidates who are fully engaged in county government. The result, he says, is certain amount of not-too-active back-benchers.

"They're very intelligent, very capable people", says Betz. "But they are not necessarily as engaged and as active as other members. I think we should make sure everyone on the county board is fully and completely engaged."

Betz says his mind has changed over the past year on county board size. He once held views more like those of Alan Kurtz. The Champaign Democrat says cutting the number of members could result in a loss of diversity --- even if, for instance, African-Americans and Hispanics keep the same percentage of seats.

"Percentage-wise, we may still be representing the same amount of people", says Kurtz. "But we're not representing the same opinions. We're losing three black, or three 'of-color' opinions, that my differ from the other two."

Only the county board can set the size of the county board, although they could ask voters to weigh in through an advisory referendum. Betz says the February hearings will give county board members the information they need to decide if they want to reduce their membership with the 2012 election.

Those hearings will be hosted by the County Board's Policy Committee --- but by the time they're held in February, that duty may have moved over to a new Committee of the Whole. The Policy Committee endorsed an overhaul of its committee structure Wednesday night that would have all county board members voting on all committee items at two monthly Committee-of-the-Whole sessions. Those sessions would replace meetings of the current six standing committees --- but the chairs of those committees would still set the agendas. The full Champaign County Board will vote on the proposal at its October 20th meeting.

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 07, 2009

Gov. Quinn, UI Students Rally for MAP Grants

Governor Pat Quinn says he's committed to keeping lawmakers in Springfield this month until a grant program for low-income college students is extended through next spring. Quinn and some of the students who rely on the Monetary Awards Program, or MAP Grants, urged the legislature restore that funding at the University of Illinois' Urbana campus Wednesday. But the Governor says he's hoping to avoid any special session days beyond the six on the legislature's fall schedule.

"We've got to go back and make sure this program is safe," says Quinn. "I had to do this with Human Services over the summer - we went 45 days of overtime but we got that improved. But we are in a tough economic time. So it calls for sacrifices by the General Assembly to do hard things." Proposals to fund the grants include a tax amnesty program and 1-dollar tax on cigarettes. But Quinn says he also wants to look at loopholes in the Illinois Tax Code, including a tax break the state provides to oil companies for offshore drilling. About 200 students and faculty were at the rally on the campus quad, where freshman Edward Washington said he stands to lose 25-hundred dollars before next semester.

"If we do not take action and reinstate the MAP grant, the General Assembly will send a message to prospective college students all across the state," says Washington. "That is - that college is for rich folk. Prospective students shouldn't even bother to apply because they just can't afford it. Does this sound right to you? I urge the members of the General Assembly not to make this a political issue." U of I Director of Financial Aid Dan Mann says if there's no new revenue for the program by November, his office will work with every student relying on the MAP Grant to see what options they might have for the spring semester - but Mann admits those choices will be limited. About 5700 students on the Urbana campus use the MAP Grants.

Categories: Education, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 07, 2009

Champaign City Council Endorses City Recycling Program for Apartments

The city of Champaign is getting ready to launch a recycling program for apartment buildings. At a study session Tuesday night, the city council told city staff to go ahead and develop a city recycling collection program that would be ready for launch next fall.

Waste-haulers in Champaign already must provide recycling pickup for single family homes and apartment buildings with less than 5 units. But under the plan endorsed last night, larger apartment buildings would also have recycling pickup. The city, using Urbana as an example, would contract for the service, and finance it with a mandatory fee charged to the landlords.

City Council member Mike Ladue says he's glad council sentiment has shifted since the early 1990s, when the city council voted to withdraw from a countywide solid waste consortium, and leave recycling to the private sector.

"This has been a question of a rising tide of public will making itself felt at the ballot box in election choices, and constituting a council more amendable to this type of development", says Ladue.

The council vote at last night's study session was met with applause from members of Students for Environmental Concerns at the U of I. Member Justin Ellis says Champaign officials should study recycling programs in other cities --- not just Urbana --- before moving forward.

"Champaign's coming late to the scene here with recycling", says Ellis. "And there's a lot of communities that have already learned a lot of the lessons related to this. And I hope that they look to those communities too in other parts of the country, and adapt the best of all these programs for us here in Champaign."

The program still awaits a final council vote, and is not expected to be up and running until next fall.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 06, 2009

Federal Money will Help Champaign County Transform its Care for Emotionally Troubled Youth

A new approach to helping emotionally-disturbed young people is getting nine million dollars in federal money.

Champaign County's Mental Health Board is implementing a new effort called the Access Initiative with the help of the state Division of Mental Health. It's meant to bring families more into the process of assisting troubled youngsters, and it's especially aimed at African-American cultural sensitivities.

Peter Tracy is the director of the county mental health board. He says previous methods of treating those children have not succeeded over time.

"Office-based therapy has not often been really successful with that population," Tracy said. "The departure is that this is a kind of outreach program where services are brought to the client and family as opposed of having them go to the office."

Under the grant, those services would be funded on a per-child basis instead of as a lump sum. They hope to serve about 200 children and teens, with families helping determine what form that assistance takes.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 06, 2009

Quinn Rallies Students to Call for MAP Grant Restoration

Gov. Pat Quinn is keeping attention on a college financial aid program for low-income students.

Lawmakers cut funding in half for the Illinois Monetary Award Program, also known as MAP grants. About 145,000 low-income students get financial assistance through the program.

The Chicago Democrat wants to see the money restored and he will rally at colleges around the state later this week, including the University of Illinois, Southern Illinois University and Bradley University. The UI rally takes place Wednesday at noon at the Illini Union.

But Quinn's Democratic primary challenger, Illinois Comptroller Dan Hynes, has said Quinn signed off on the cuts to the program. The cuts were part of lawmakers' efforts to deal with a gaping budget hole.

Quinn has had other MAP grant rallies at Northern Illinois University and the University of Illinois at Chicago.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 06, 2009

Two Hotel Operators Interested in Urbana’s Shuttered Historic Lincoln Hotel

Urbana's economic development manager says two hotel operating groups are interested in the Historic Lincoln Hotel.

Tom Carrino didn't name the two companies during Monday night's Urbana City Council meeting. But he says both are interested in possibly bringing a major hotel brand to the facility --- while preserving the building's architectural integrity.

The Historic Lincoln was designed by local architect Joseph W. Royer. It opened in 1924 and closed last March --- about the same time it was acquired by Marine Bank of Springfield in a foreclosure. Its previous owners had struggled to compete with newer hotels located closer to interstate highways. Carrino says the Historic Lincoln's location in downtown Urbana may be a plus to the two hotel groups now considering the property.

"That means that it's relatively close to the University of Illinois", says Carrino. "It's close to some major employers in downtown Urbana. The fact that it was involved in a foreclosure, the bank is motivated to sell the property. That means that a good hotel group could get the property at a relatively reasonable price.

Carrino says he expects both companies will prepare competing offers to Marine Bank for the Historic Lincoln in the coming weeks. He says both companies have discussed possible tax incentives with city officials --- those incentives would be possible due to the hotel's location in a Tax Increment Finance District and a city Enterprise Zone.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 05, 2009

Short Supplies Cost Vermilion County its Public Health Flu Clinics

Vermilion County's Health Department won't provide seasonal flu clinics for the first time in over 30 years.

Administrator Steven Laker says it's not receiving enough doses of the vaccine from a distributor to even hold one day of the walk-in clinic, despite being told by a distributor two weeks ago that enough would be available. That will force a few thousand people to get their shots from clinics and retail pharmacies.

Laker contends public health departments are being squeezed for vaccines by those pharmacies. And he says it's not a supply problem, but rather one of distributors meeting federal demands for H1N1, or swine flu vaccine:

"So they had a dual production stream going -- H1N1 and seasonal flu," Laker said. "My conjecture is that the vaccine is manufactured -- they just can't get it packaged and distributed while they're settling their federal contracts."

Laker says the department will get 600 doses of seasonal flu vaccine to fulfill contracts for vaccinating state and county workers. An additional 300 doses of children's vaccine will be available by appointment only while supplies last.

Vermilion County's flu clinics have been held each year since 1976. Laker says another concern is they're a revenue stream -- his department stands to lose about 50-thousand dollars. But he says it's too soon to say what other programs might be affected.

Meanwhile, demand for flu vaccine at the U of I's McKinley Health Center has temporarily suspended shots to faculty, staff, retirees, and state workers. Director Dr. Robert Palinkas says some students may even be turned away as it works with a limited supply. He says it's unclear when additional vaccines will become available.

Categories: Health

AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 05, 2009

Former Gov. Edgar “Pessimistic” about IL Finances

Former Illinois Governor Jim Edgar says calls the state's financial crisis the worst he's ever seen since first being involved in state government.

The Republican says he was optimistic after the ouster of former Governor Rod Blagojevich in February. But Edgar says he's now pessimistic since no one stepped forward to address Illinois' finances, calling last spring's legislative session one of his greatest disappointments.

Edgar says an income tax hike is unavoidable. But he says the proper cuts need to take place first, including those in so-called 'sacred cows' like elementary and secondary education:

"I believe if tell people and you're fair about it and you don't just pick on one segment, one part of the state to make those cuts, I think the public will understand," said Edgar. "It's going to take people with leadership willing to step forward and do what has to be done."

Ethics is also on the table for legislators when they meet in just over a week, but Edgar says Illinois really has a bipartisan leadership problem that exists in both the House and Senate.

Edgar spoke at the Illinois News Broadcasters Association conference over the weekend, where he received the Illinoisan of the Year award.

Categories: Biography, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 05, 2009

U of I Board Focuses on Finding a New Permanent President

With Stanley Ikenberry selected to step in as interim president, the University Of Illinois Board Of Trustees is going ahead with a search for a permanent president to succeed Joseph White.

At their special meeting Saturday in Urbana , the Board approved the structure for a search committee. The panel has seats reserved for every sector of the university community --- faculty, staff, students, alumni and the university's foundation. And interim president designate Stanley Ikenberry says something new has been added that makes this U of I search committee different from ones in the past.

"And that is the recommendation in this case that three trustees join that search committee. I think personally that is a very wise move, given where we are at this point --- and I think will be an important factor in helping us attract first-rate candidates."

The committee will spend the next several months conducting a national search for a new president.

U of I Board Chairman Chris Kennedy says he wasn't worried that October might be a little late in the year to be able to find a strong candidate for the job.

"I don't think in fact that we're behind the eight ball at all. I think that we should have great confidence that we can find the best candidate. I think this university represents the best option for career change for anybody in the educational environment in America today. And I'm confident we'll end up with the best person in American to run the University of Illinois."

That confidence was echoed by the representative of the executive search firm that will help the search committee in its work. Michael Baer of Boston-based Isaacson Miller says the prime season for recruiting university presidents is just beginning. But he notes that other major universities are also conducting presidential searches --- including the University of Virginia, Texas A & M and North Carolina State.

U of I trustees hope to select a permanent president by next May, in order for that person to be on the job in time for the start of the next fall semester.

Categories: Education

AP - Illinois Public Media News - October 03, 2009

Trustees Choose Ikenberry as U of I Interim President

The University of Illinois Board of Trustees Saturday voted to name Stanley Ikenberry the interim president. He'll succeed B. Joseph White, who announced last week he would step down in the wake of the university admissions scandal.

Ikenberry was the U of I's youngest president when he started his 16 year stint in the position in 1979. He later served as president of the American Council on Education, before returning to the U of I as Regent Professor. Now 74, Ikenberry says he's ready to lead the university through what he calls a brief but important transition period.

"I had a love affair with the University of Illinois that started 30 years ago and hasn't abated since that time", says Ikenberry. "I've said all along that if I could help and the university needed my help, I would be happy and actually honored."

Until his term begins January 1st, Ikenberry will be the U of I's interim president-designate --- working alongside President White and other administrators to make an orderly transition.

Ikenberry had been considered as a possible interim president as far back as September 23rd, the day White announced his resignation. But university board chairman Chris Kennedy says they actually considered 30 or 40 possible candidates, and Ikenberry "stood head and shoulders above the rest".

Kennedy had little to say about the future of Richard Herman, except to say that that Urbana Chancellor was a "great leader" and the board needed to discuss his future in executive session. Like White, Herman was criticized by the governor's Admissions Review Commission for his role in the admissions scandal.

Also Saturday, trustees formally approved White's resignation and approved his new position as professor of business administration on the Urbana campus. Trustees also approved a structure for a search committee to find a permanent U of I president to take office in time for the fall semester. They selected the executive search firm of Isaacson Miller to help in the process.

Categories: Education

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