Illinois Public Media News

AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 26, 2010

New Kind of Senior Housing To Be Built In Rural Champaign County

The village of St. Joseph looks to become the first U-S community to build a different kind of home for the elderly.

Abbeyfield House is a non-profit facility that began in England in the 1950's, and now has more than 700 locations in 16 countries. The goal of the Abbeyfield Society is keeping relatively healthy seniors near their current home, but adds the benefits of living with others.

A groundbreaking ceremony was held Sunday in St. Joseph, where organizers expect to move about 12 residents by the end of the year. Mary Butzow is the President of Abbeyfield Society USA. She began researching the overseas homes when seeking out a new place for her mother to live. "And too many seniors, particularly if they lost their house or their life partner, are isolated in their house,' said Butzow. "Their kids may not live around here. People drop in and out, but there are hours and hours at a time when they're alone. This way, they have 11 other people their same age who are going to be living within 10 feet of them. Research has shown that seniors stay healthier longer when they have good, nutritious meals and somebody to visit with."

The village of St. Joseph approved construction of Abbeyfield House last year. The home is being paid for by those who have bought apartments in the 13,000 square foot home, and will take most of it with them when leaving the home. Seven seniors already have memberships, ranging in age from 60 to 90. Butzow says Abbeyfield House differs from a nursing home, having no medical staff on hand, with only an on-site manager to prepare 2 meals a day . She says cities in Minnesota and Indiana have shown an interest in starting up their own house, but adds a few Central Illinois towns hope to generate enough interest for an Abbeyfield House of their own.

Categories: Community

AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 23, 2010

Regulators Close Broadway Bank, 3 Other IL Banks

Democratic Senate candidate Alexi Giannoulias is mourning the collapse of his father's bank while trying not to let it hobble his campaign.

It's a familiar Friday afternoon ritual - federal regulators closing community banks. This week, seven more were taken over. One of them was a bit out of the ordinary. The unraveling of Broadway Bank has become one of the central issues in the fight for President Barack Obama's former Senate seat. Republican Mark Kirk has hammered Giannoulias over his role at the bank when bad loans were made. Giannoulias places most of the blame elsewhere.

"Wall Street greed coupled with lax oversight by Washington politicians led to a deep recession that leveled a crippling blow to the real estate market," said Giannoulias

Giannoulias says he does accept responsibility for the delinquent loans booked while he was a senior loan officer at the bank. He says they number less than 9% of the bank's bad loans overall. Chicago-based MB Financial Bank is taking over Broadway Bank.

Besides Broadway Bank, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. also took control of New Century Bank of Chicago, Citizens Bank & Trust Co. of Chicago and Amcore Bank of Rockford. The agency found institutions to assume the assets of all four banks, which will reopen Saturday. Deposits at all four banks will continue to be insured by the FDIC.

Categories: Business
Tags: business

AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 23, 2010

Vermilion County Gets EPA Grant to ID Contaminated Sites

Federal money will give health officials in Vermilion County the chance to inspect old industrial sites for contaminated waste and discuss their future.

Half the $400,000 grant from the US EPA will go towards identifying hazardous substances... while the other $200,000 is to identify petroleum as part of the agency's Brownfields assessment program.

Doug Toole is an environmental health specialist with the county's health department. He's identified 32 potential sites for inspection and possible cleanup... including old factories, gas stations, salvage yards, and dry cleaners. The sites are in Danville and nearby cities like Hoopeston and Westville.

Toole says the funds will let the county bring in an environmental consultant to help coordinate public hearings. He says the first hearings wouldn't be about specific sites, but serve more as an orientation:

When people are complaining about junk houses in their community and dump sites and things like that --- stuff that we handle on a routine basis --- and that's good", says Toole. "We can get those things cleaned up. But I want to be sure the public's aware of what we're talking about with a brownfield. Just because there's an empty business in the area doesn't mean that that it necessarily has contaminants in the soil or asbestos or lead-based paint."

The $400,000 from the EPA can't be used for salaries at the financially struggling health department. Toole says a separate grant will be required for cleanup of the sites, and other hearings will be held to look at potential uses. Danville failed in its bid to receive the same EPA grant, but plans on re-applying.

The Vermilion County Health Department is owed half a million dollars from the state, and has laid off more than 40 employees this year. Toole says it's hard to say what would happen if the department was to fold, but he would expect that someone else in the county would take over the work.

Categories: Government, Health, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 23, 2010

UI and Carle Hospital Collaborate on Research Project

The University of Illinois and Urbana's Carle Foundation Hospital have cooperated on research in the past - but a new agreement is meant to elevate that cooperation by a few notches.

The U of I and Carle have launched a biomedical research alliance, with the university sharing space with Carle researchers in the Mills Breast Cancer Institute. The joint agreement will focus on four research areas: cancer, cardiology, neurosciences and gastrointestinal health.

Carle CEO Dr. James Leonard says the agreement will foster new communication between doctors on both sides.

"That may sound like well, 'didn't that go on all the time before'. and the answer is no", says Leonard. "We're both big institutions and we both focused on what we did. and this allows us to meet not at that interface."

Leonard hopes the research alliance will bring new medical advancements closer to patients and help attract physicians who want to practice and do research at the same time.

Categories: Health, Science

AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 23, 2010

Attorney for Carrington Family Calls Suspension a “Good First Step

The attorney representing Kiwane Carrington's family in their civil lawsuit against Champaign Police says Thursday's decision to suspend the police officer involved to 30 days' unpaid suspension doesn't necessarily make their case stronger.

But James Montgomery Junior says he plans to build the family's case on the testimony of the only other witness to the shooting other than the officers - the teenager who was with Carrington, Jeshaun Manning-Carter.

"While Officer Norbits claims he doesn't remember them (certain alleged facts in the case that Montgomery wouldn't disclose), this young man does, and (he) will shed clear light on the fact that Kiwane Carrington was wrongfully shot, and there was some conduct there that went beyond accidental firing of the weapon."

Montgomery calls Officer Daniel Norbits' 30 day suspension a good first step toward picking up the pieces from the shooting. Yet another investigation of the police shooting incident - this one by the Justice Department -- is still in progress.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 23, 2010

Students at U of I Earth Day Rally Focus on Reducing Coal Use

Student organizers of Thursday's Earth Day rally on the U of I Urbana campus focused on 'no more coal'.

Parker Laubach heads the Beyond Coal campaign as part of the Students for Environmental Concern, which sponsored and organized the rally. He proposes stopping upgrades to the campus' Abbott Power Plant and beginning the phase-out of coal on the university's campus.

But, Champaign City Councilman and Deputy Mayor Michael LaDue is surprised that the focus isn't more on reducing campus car traffic.

"Automobiles don't burn coal, but coal is a significant issue, "says LaDue. "I won't dismiss it. But on the University of Illinois campus, I think the presence of gas-guzzling automobiles is the preeminent environmental problem"

Reducing coal use was one of three actions proposed by student speakers during the rally.

The rally also featured LaDue and Urbana Mayor Laurel Prussing reading proclamations on their cities' commitment to promoting environmental education and fighting climate change. Interim Chancellor Robert Easter also spoke about the university's commitment to environmental policies.

Thursday marked the 40th anniversary of the first Earth Day.

Categories: Education, Environment

AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 23, 2010

Champaign County Board Passes Land Resource Management Plan

A long-range plan to guide Champaign County regulation of rural land use won county board approval Thursday night with the support of all of the Democrats and half the Republicans.

The new Land Resource Management Plan covers a wide range of issues, with the goal of preserving Champaign County's prime farmland. But the focus of recent controversy had been limits on what development will be allowed on agricultural land "by right", that is, without county approval. As originally drafted, the plan limited building on farmland to one lot per 40 acres. But Barb Wysocki, the County Board's Democratic Land Use Committee Chair says that was modified during talks with Republicans over the last two weeks..

"Some were very adamant that the strict one-per-40, which is where we started, had virtually no support in the Republican caucus", said Wysocki, "which obviously was not going to work."

What apparently did work was a policy allowing two new lots per 40 acres of farmland by right, as long as no more than 3 acres of best prime farmland is developed. With that change added, six Republicans voted for the plan meant to guide county land use regulation for the next 20 years.

But Mahomet Republican John Jay doesn't feel the plan gets it right. While recent debate focused on how much farmland an owner could develop without seeking county permission, Jay says the problems with the plan go beyond that.

"Specifically property owner rights, obviously" said Jay. "But more importantly, it's overreached. And I'm not sure where we're going with this. You know, building codes and health and safety issues, and all the things that concern all of us, shouldn't be in a land use plan. A land use plan ought to be concise to land use."

Jay was one of the six Republicans voting against the Land Resource Management Plan.

Champaign County officials must now work out how to apply the plan to its ordinances and rules governing rural land use. They had struggled for years to find consensus for a comprehensive zoning review, before deciding to work out the Land Resource Management Plan as a guideline.

One of the six other Republicans who voted no, John Jay, says the Land Resource Management Plans' main problem is its overall scope --- one he says goes far beyond actual land use issues.

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 22, 2010

Vermilion County Health Dept Slashes Four More Programs, 20 Positions

The Vermilion County Health Department is cutting four more programs that rely on state grants and 20 additional jobs with it. Department Administrator Steve Laker says the County's Board Of Health was forced into this move after the Vermilion County Board this week rejected a request for an additional loan of $400,000. The state now owes the health department $500,000 - an amount expected to grow to $700,000 by June.

As of May 21st, the department's staff will be nearly half what it was the first of this year, with 32 total job cuts. The four programs being eliminated are Family Case Management, Healthworks Illinois, Healthy Child Care, and the Case Coordination Unit. Laker says that unit's nursing home pre-screenings will be among those areas missed the most. "We're going to work with anybody we can so that hopefully these services get picked up by someone else locally and facilitate that transition, "said Laker. "But we don't have any assurance of that yet."

Laker says his goal now is holding onto the Women, Infants, and Children - or WIC program, and Family Planning, which are federal programs. WIC is exclusively federally funded, while Family Planning relies partially on county money. Laker says both have been running in Vermilion County for about 40 years. "So these are long-standing practices and well-accepted pratices," said Laker. "However, right now, these are times we've never experienced. So we're being squeezed, they're (Vermilion County) being squeezed, and unfortunately, what's on the potential chopping block is these services." Cutting those federal programs would reduce the health department to minimum certified status, reducing its staff by about two-thirds, to about 20 employees. Laker says he's considering other options, including mandatory furlough days for employees. If the department does have to cut WIC and Family Planning, he notes it would have an obligation to pay those staff members their accrued benefits, as well as their unemployment, which is funded by the county.

Categories: Government, Health, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 22, 2010

Champaign Police Officer Involved in Fatal Shooting Faces Suspension

The officer who shot and killed a teenager during a scuffle behind a Champaign home last fall will be suspended without pay for 30 days.

Officer Daniel Norbits and Police Chief RT Finney had responded to a call on Vine Street last October 9th-in the ensuing confrontation with 15 year old Kiwane Carrington and another teen, Norbits' firearm went off, killing Carrington. The incident worsened already-tense relations between Champaign police and African-Americans in the city. 30 days unpaid suspension is the toughest discipline allowed short of termination under the city's union contact with police.

Retired McLean County judge John Freese was one of two outside experts asked to investigate the incident. Freese found that Officer Norbits violated police rules by not having enough control over his firearm with struggling with Carrington - namely, his trigger finger was improperly placed.

"While the officer was using his left hand to try to take Carrington to the ground, the weapon which was in his right hand had sufficient pressure placed on the trigger to discharge the weapon," Freese said. "And training would have expected the officer to have his finger indexed on the side of the weapon so it would be outside of the trigger guard."

City Manager Steve Carter also used an internal investigation to determine that Norbits failed to maintain control of the weapon. He believes the discipline fits the violation - it's the strongest punishment short of firing.

"The death of a person in Champaign-Urbana is a serious matter for sure," Carter said. "The public has some right to expect our police officers to handle their weapons in a way that doesn't endanger the public."

The other outside investigator in the case, retired Urbana police chief Eddie Adair, says the indexing technique is taught to all officers, but it should be reiterated every year to rookies and veterans alike.

"We see this as an opportunity to improve on how we administer our training," said Adair. "Because even if it is a tragic incident, it's still an opportunity for us to learn as human beings. That's what's most important here."

The union representing Champaign Police issued a prepared statement saying it's extremely disappointed by Norbits' suspension. The Fraternal Order of Police labor council says Carrington brought about the tragedy through his own resistance.

In December State's Attorney Julia Rietz decided not to file criminal charges against Norbits or Finney. Earlier this month, the state's attorney's office dropped a juvenile charge against the other boy involved in the incident.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - April 22, 2010

Gov. Quinn Faces Budget Questions During Champaign Visit

While local agencies struggle to get by because of overdue state funding, Governor Pat Quinn says Illinois will meet all of its obligations for fiscal year 2010.

"We have adequate revenue to pay all the bills", Quinn said to reporters in Champaign on Wednesday. "It's been slow. The payments have been delayed, because we have a mountain of debt that I inherited when I became governor. I'm doing the very best I can to pay our debt down. I have to tell the truth about what we have to do to get that done."

Quinn says the most important thing for lawmakers to do is to pass the increase in the state income tax that he's proposed to help pay for education. But the governor avoided saying whether he thought House Speaker Mike Madigan would allow to vote to occur in his chamber.

"Mike Madigan, the Speaker, is a good friend of mine", said Quinn. "I talk to him every day, practically. But I don't agree with him every day, and he doesn't agree with me. And so we have discussions and dialog. And ultimately, I think the best thing for the people is to have a vote. That's what democracy is, and that's what legislatures are all about. And they should vote on something as revenue for education."

Quinn has proposed a list of what he calls "loopholes" in the tax code that he wants to close --- including a proposed tax on digital downloads and requiring banks to disclose the accounts of tax scofflaws. But he says the one percentage-point increase in the state income tax is his top priority.

The governor also proposes extending the deadline by which the state must pay bills from the previous fiscal year by another four months past the current September 1st date. Administration officials says that would help the state pay service providers first, and relieve the pressure on agencies that have struggling to stay open due to delays in state grant money. The deadline extension is part of a proposal that also includes additional budget cuts and borrowing to pay pensions.

The governor spoke to reporters outside downtown Champaign's Virginia Theater, during opening night of the 12th annual Roger Ebert's Film Festival. Quinn introduced the long-time film critic at the festival, presenting him with a copy of a proclamation naming Wednesday "Ebertfest Day" in Illinois. Also during his stop in Champaign, the governor marked the oncoming celebration of Earth Day with a tour of a model solar-powered house designed by University of Illinois students. The "Gable Home" won second place in last year's biennial Solar Decathlon, sponsored by the U-S Department of Energy.

Categories: Government, Politics

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