Illinois Public Media News


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - January 06, 2012

Circuit Clerk Candidate Allowed to Stay on Ballot

A Republican candidate running for Champaign County circuit clerk will remain on the ballot for her party's primary.

The legitimacy of Stephanie Holderfield's candidacy was challenged after she signed the ballot petition of Ben Carlson, a Democratic candidate running for Champaign County auditor. Holderfield signed Carlson's ballot petition during a party on Oct. 8, 2011.

Steve Frank, a Fisher attorney, had asked a three-member electoral panel to remove Holderfield's name from the ballot. However, the board determined on Friday that despite Holderfield's actions, she can still run in the race.

While Champaign County Clerk Gordy Hulten supported keeping Holderfield on the ballot, he said her actions in this case were extreme.

"Parties have separate nomination contests for a reasons, and candidates in my opinion should be held to higher standards," Hulten said. "It is absolutely clear in my mind that candidate Holderfield violated the statute, and should have known better and did know better."

In citing a similar case that went to trial, Hulten said since Holderfield signed ballot petitions for Republican candidates before signing the ballot petition of a Democratic candidate, her signature is not counted on Democrat Ben Carlson's petition during this election cycle.

Electoral board member and Champaign County States Attorney Julia Rietz also criticized Holderfield and Carlson for collecting signatures from people who signed each other's ballot petitions.

"It is clear that Ben Carlson and candidate Holderfield were not paying attention to who was signing their petitions," Rietz said. "No one is contesting the validity of signatures on (Holderfield's) nominating petition."

Holderfield said she is grateful that she will still be able to stay in the primary race.

"In retrospect, I would have done things differently," Holderfield said. "However, I did not know there were other people at the party that had signed Ben's petition. So, I'm grateful, however, for the opportunity that I had to remain on the ballot."

Attorney Deb Feinen represented Steve Frank, who had asked the electoral board to review Holderfield's place on the ballot. Feinen has five days to appeal the ruling, but she said she hasn't decided yet whether she will do that.

Holderfield is competing in the March 20 primary against former state legislator Rick Winkel.

Categories: Biography, Government, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - January 06, 2012

Longtime UI Chaplain Edward Duncan Dies

A longtime associate of Monsignor Edward Duncan says he has heard from a lot of former University of Illinois athletes, who plan to attend Duncan's funeral mass last week.

Duncan, who died this week in California at age 96, was chaplain at the U of I Urbana campus for more than half a century, from 1943 to 1998.

Jack Hatfield worked at the Division of Intercollegiate Athletics for several years, and he is currently the Director of Advancement at St. John's Catholic Newman Center on the U of I Urbana campus. He said said Duncan's strong social skills made it easy for people to talk to him.

"I think he substantially impacted football players from the '50s, '60s and '70s, when he was in his prime," Hatfield said. "So you got thirty or forty years there of people who really relied upon him as a guide, as a counselor, as an adviser, whatever portion they chose to lean on his for their faith or spirituality."

Hatfield said Duncan rescued the center from near bankruptcy when he first arrived there in the 1940s.

Hatfield said the Newman Center benefited from Duncan's strong business sense, having come from a wealthy family with several business interests. He said the same social skills that helped make him an effective chaplain also made Duncan a popular the dinner guest in Champaign-Urbana society circles.

In addition, Hatfield said Duncan channeled his personal wealth into donations to the U of I, notably the Newman Center, the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts and the Division of Intercollegiate Athletics.

A wake and visitation for Monsignor Edward Duncan will be held in his home town of LaSalle, Tuesday, Jan. 10 from 4 PM to 7 PM at Hurst Funeral Home. Peoria Catholic Bishop Daniel Jenky will celebrate a funeral mass for Duncan at St. Patrick's Parish, also in LaSalle, on Wednesday, Jan. 11th at 11 AM. A memorial mass will be held at a later date on the U of I campus.

Categories: Biography, Education, Religion

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - January 06, 2012

UI Professor Tackles Obesity, Diabetes in Immigrant Communities

Obesity is hitting Latino children in the United States harder than any other demographic, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Angela Wiley, a professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, is trying to curb that trend in immigrant communities living in Illinois. She heads the Up Amigos project, which looks at how biological, social, and environmental factors affect rates of obesity and diabetes. Illinois Public Radio's Rachel Otwell talks with Wiley about her research.

(Photo courtesy of the University of Illinois)

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AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 06, 2012

NFL Labor Group Decries Indiana GOP Efforts to Pass Labor Bill

The NFL Players Association is opposing Indiana Republicans' efforts to pass a divisive labor bill before the nation turns its attention to the state for the Super Bowl.

The players association said Friday that Indiana Republicans are trying to "ram through'' the legislation before Indianapolis hosts the Super Bowl on Feb. 5.

Indiana House Speaker Brian Bosma has set a quick timetable for passing the measure but has been stymied by House Democrats who entered their third consecutive day of blocking the measure Friday.

Bosma and other Republicans say they gave ample airing of the issue during 20 hours of legislative hearings over the summer. They contend the measure is needed to attract more businesses to the state. Opponents say it will drive down wages and reduce union membership.

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 06, 2012

Proposed Mine May Threaten Starved Rock

Starved Rock is located in Utica, Illinois - a two hour drive southwest from Chicago. It's a popular destination for fishing, rock climbing, hiking and picnicking.

Tony Giordano said a new silica sand mine adjacent to the park would mean new jobs and could inject $9 million into the local economy. He's the president of Mississippi Sand, the company proposing the mine. It mines a special kind of sandstone found in this part of the state and sell it to companies who frac for natural gas around the United States.

Giordano said he's not surprised that people are concerned about what the mine could mean for Starved Rock.

"We don't believe in any way that our utilization of our proposed parcel will negatively impact anybody within the park," he said. Giordano added that regulatory bodies are in place to make sure of that, too.

But environmentalists worry about its effects on the local ecology. Mike Phillips is a Geology Professor at Illinois Valley Community College and said the mine would hurt 73 acres of wetlands.

"The process of creating the mine will de-water part of that wetland initially and then the mine plan has them mining most of it," Phillips said.

Phillips said the aesthetic value of the park is at risk, too, "If there's noise, if there's dust, if you can feel vibrations from the occasional explosions at the mine - what would the value of that be? And that's very, very difficult to determine."

Phillips said he and many others he's spoken to learned about the proposed mine in November. He's hoping LaSalle County will slow the process down of issuing permits to the mining company and that they'll first make a comprehensive assessment of how a mine may impact the ecology and economy of Starved Rock, as many people's make their livings off the park's tourism.

The LaSalle County Board voted unanimously for the mine in December and they could make a final recommendation next week.

(Photo by Todd Ryburn/flickr)

Categories: Environment

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - January 06, 2012

Decatur Expects to Resume Taxi Service in About a Month

Decatur lost its only taxi service last year.

But its city manager hopes the owner of that company can start up something new, and be ready in about a month. AOK Taxi was shut down last year, after reports of the company using an unregistered vehicle, and making unannounced changes to the company and fleet.

Decatur City Manager Ryan McCrady says company owner Anthony Walker applied for a new license on Tuesday. But Walker also asked to hold off on a recommendation to city council until he reviewed his financial plans. If he moves forward with it, McCrady says that will essentially wipe the slate clean for Walker.

"If he meets all the requirements to have a license, then there's really no sense in trying to open old wounds and bring those issues back up again," he said. "The key thing is to get a service operating in Decatur that meet the requirements of the city than our residents can safely operate in. And if Mr. Walker can do that with his new company, then that's the best case scenario for everybody."

If that doesn't happen, McCrady says offers have come in from taxi services in nearby towns. Meanwhile, Walker says he'll decide whether to follow through with his plan by next week. If that happens, Walker says he plans to raise cab fares to make them more in line to what other nearby companies charge.

"It's a service to the community, but I don't want to run this operation like the community needs it, then it doesn't need to be profitable," he said. "Because that's the wrong way I looked at it once before."

Walker says the hike in fares is needed with the rising cost in fuel. He plans to meet with local bar owners next week to discuss potential collaborations before deciding whether to move forward.

Categories: Economics, Transportation

AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 05, 2012

Central Illinois Farmland Prices Up Again in 2011

The cost of farmland in central Illinois increased by almost a third in 2011, land sales professionals say, continuing a trend of the past few years.

The average price of land in the 15 counties around Decatur rose from $8,000 an acre in 2010 to $10,500 last year, Dale Aupperle, president of the Heartland Ag Group in Decatur, told The Journal Star newspaper in Peoria (http://bit.ly/yyGV1Y ).

Continued high prices for corn and soybeans and investor demand are driving the trend, Aupperle said, one that he said doesn't represent a bubble ready to burst.

"There are people who didn't buy (farmland) in July 2010 when the average price was $7,000 an acre. They were shocked that it had gone up from $6,000 an acre the year before," he said. "Now (prime land) is selling for over $11,000. This is driven by investor demand, it's not a bubble."

University of Illinois farm economist Gary Schnitkey agrees that price increases aren't like those seen prior to farming's economic collapse in the 1980s.

"In the 1980s, when prices declined, you had high interest rates and high inflation," he said. "Interest rates are expected to remain low, and low levels tend to support land prices."

But Schnitkey thinks increases in both crop and farmland price will ease this year.

Categories: Business
Tags: business

AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 05, 2012

Fines Pending for Ind. House Dems in Labor Battle

Growing tension among defiant House Democrats facing stiff fines and sparse resources threatens to disrupt a no-show effort aimed at blocking a bill that would make Indiana the first state in more than a decade to enact right-to-work legislation.

Democrats stalled business Wednesday, the first day of the 2012 session, when they did not report to the House floor. They continued Thursday to block action on a right-to-work measure that would make Indiana the first state in more than a decade to bar private unions from collecting mandatory fees.

Inside the 40-member caucus, lawmakers are split over how much they can afford to keep stalling in order to block the bill. Some strode out of Thursday's caucus meeting saying that if they suffered through last year's five-week stay in Urbana, Ill., they can stand on principle now.

But others said new $1,000-a-day fines established by Republicans after last year's walkout have raised the stakes much higher than some can afford.

"Last year they were taking my bank account, this year they're taking my home," said Rep. David Cheatham, D-North Vernon. Cheatham was one of three Democrats who has joined Republicans in the House chamber each day. They say they oppose the right-to-work measure but don't agree with the stall tactics.

House Democratic Leader Patrick Bauer said Thursday that Republican House Speaker Brian Bosma told him in a private meeting he would begin fining Democrats on Friday.

"It's a significant issue. We think it's another assault against free speech," Bauer said as he walked into the House Democratic caucus meeting.

But Bosma said he had not decided whether to begin implementing the fines Friday and that no legal paperwork had been started.

"We're just counting on folks having some common sense and showing up for work eventually," Bosma said.

Rep. Ed DeLaney, D-Indianapolis, joined the three Democrats Thursday for a quorum vote that placed Republicans very close to getting the numbers they need to push the bill forward. He said he is asking Republicans to give them more public hearings on the issue.

He also noted there is little Democrats can do to stop the measure.

"That's the quandary, and we have to decide: What we can we do?" DeLaney said. "We have limited resources and we have a limited number of votes."

National right-to-work advocates say they see Indiana as their best shot at passing the labor bill into law. Despite a slate of statehouse wins across the nation in 2010, Republicans have been unable to move the measure yet. They came closest in New Hampshire, but lawmakers could not find the votes to overturn Democratic Gov. John Lynch's veto.

Bauer and other Democrats would not say Thursday how long they planned to stall. Instead, Bauer said, they plan to hold public hearings on the proposal around the state as soon as this weekend. The first hearings could happen in Fort Wayne and Evansville.

The new law levies a fine of $1,000 per day against each lawmaker who sits out more than three days in a row. Republicans established the new penalties after Democrats left the state last year to block the right-to-work measure.

The House Democratic caucus meanwhile opened an account on the Democratic fundraising website ActBlue and sent out an appeal Wednesday on Facebook seeking donations of between $5 and $250. "The Indiana House Democrats NEED YOUR HELP! Please support our caucus as we fight another battle against the Republicans as they try to push RTW legislation through without listening to working Hoosiers," the Democrats wrote in their appeal.

Indiana Democratic Party spokeswoman Jennifer Wagner said her group did not pay for any of the penalties accrued last year and did not plan to pay any fines this year.

A lawsuit challenging fines from last year's session filed by Rep. Bill Crawford, D-Indianapolis, is still being weighed by a Marion County Superior Court judge.

(AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - January 05, 2012

Former Head of Illinois’ ACLU Dies

The long-time head of the American Civil Liberties Union of Illinois is being remembered as an ardent defender of freedom of speech. Jay Miller passed away Tuesday in Evanston due to complications from emphysema.

Before spending four decades with the ACLU, Miller served in the Army and worked as a reporter.

Colleen Connell succeeded Miller as the executive director of the Illinois ACLU. She said his legacy on human rights is profound on both a local and national level.

Miller landed on President Richard Nixon's enemies list in part for defending protestors arrested during the 1968 Democratic Convention in Chicago.

"Jay was a lion in every meaning of the word. He was among the most courageous human beings in defending other people and defending constitutional principles," Connell said.

Services are planned for Friday at Chicago Jewish Funerals in Skokie. Miller was 83.

Categories: Biography
Tags: people

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