Illinois Public Media News

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - March 18, 2011

Champaign County Board Approves Olympian Drive Plan

The Champaign County Board has ended its long-running debate on Olympian Drive.

On a 19-to-7 vote, board members settled on a plan to connect the dead-end road north of Champaign with Lincoln Avenue in Urbana, where it connects with Interstate-74. Two weeks after rejecting a 'green' option, the Board approved a 'purple' configuration of North Lincoln expected to have less of an impact on residents, cutting diagonally through property owned by Squire Farms.

Urbana Mayor Laurel Prussing praised the board's diligence after backing the Olympian project herself for years.

"This has thoroughly discussed," she said. "There's people around the world that want democracy. I don't know if they realize how exhausting it is, but certainly it's a better system that people have ever come up with. And I think the county board really took this seriously. And they studied it, and I think they've come to a conclusion."

Thirteen Democrats and six Republicans supported the project. Five of the seven 'no' votes came from rural Republicans, as well as Champaign Democrats Pattsi Petrie and Alan Kurtz.

The plan was approved with an amendment offered by Urbana Democrat James Quisenberry, who wanted to ensure the design didn't move any further south and east, where it could impact other residents.

"The property owners that the road goes right next to are the ones that are going to be most affected," Quisenberry said. "And they didn't really want the road there in the first place, but now that it's going there, we have to make sure they're protected as much as we can."

Prussing said the city will still work with individual landowners to alleviate any concerns as the project moves forward. She said anyone losing land will be paid for it by Champaign County or the city of Urbana, but those that do not agree would require govermment use of eminent domain for property.

The Olympian Drive portion of the project is expected to be built in 2013, with the stretch of Lincoln Avenue to be finished in 2015. The entire project is estimated at nearly $20-million, paid for through Illinois Jobs Now funding, the state motor fuel tax, and federal funds.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - March 18, 2011

Indiana GOP Says Negotiations with Absent Democrats Are Over

Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels says it's "sad but necessary'' for the Republican leader of the Indiana House to end negotiations with boycotting Democrats.

Daniels says the more than 30 Democrats staying in an Urbana hotel have forfeited their right to participate in the legislative session. They've been staying in Illinois since Feb. 22.

The Governor says Republican Speaker Brian Bosma has bent over "double backward'' to meet unreasonable demands from Democrats on education- and labor-related bills. But Daniels still hopes the lawmakers will return from Illinois.

"I still hope they'll do their duty and come back." he said. "They're welcome if they do, but we can't wait forever."

Bosma says the time for negotiating is over.

"Time has expired," he said. "We're now in our fourth very expensive week of an unprecendented walkout. Approaching an American record, not just an Indiana record."

Bosma and Indiana Senate Pro Tem David Long says the Senate would start hearing next week on the state budget plan that has stalled in the House during the four-week walkout. The Senate will also work on advancing other proposals without waiting for House Democrats to return. Long says the Senate has tried to stay out of the dispute, but that it's 'disingenious' for the boycotting Democrats to claim they're negotiating.

Democratic House member Win Moses of Fort Wayne said there have been good communications on those issues and that ending talks would be an arbitrary and harsh choice by Bosma. The legislative session is scheduled to end by late April, but Daniels said he was prepared to call a special session if necessary.

Categories: Education, Government, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - March 18, 2011

Tests Confirm Toxins Found in Boneyard Creek Site

A health care advocates group says the findings of environmental experts from a Boneyard Creek pipeline confirm their fears about contaminants.

Champaign County Health Care Consumers brought in the researchers to investigate the old pipe that extends from the site of a former manufactured gas plant at Champaign's 5th and Hill Streets owned by Ameren. Grant Antoline, an activist with the group, said lab results confirmed there was coal tar in the pipe, and it contained organic compounds like benzene, and hydrocarbons that exceed safety standards.

"We've always been concerned that there's been some sort of dumping into the Boneyard Creek from 3 years ago when we started this campaign," Antoline said. "It's just common practice for these plants to be set up next to a waterway. But to see results of one million, 300-thousand percent higher than they should be is outrageous, and there's no excuse for not investing in the pipe when it's this serious."

Residents in the 5th and Hill neighborhood have long complained over odors in their basements, and nagging health problems. The consumer group's 60-day notice of intent to sue the city of Champaign over cleaning up the pipe will expire April 11th. Its executive director, Claudia Lennhoff, says they simply want the line capped off.

"Their part of the action should be fairly simple and straightforward in terms of the notice of intent to sue," Lennhoff said. "All that we require of them under the Clean Water Act and that notice of intent to sue is to block off the discharge into the Boneyard."

Lennhoff said the city should make Ameren pay for sealing up the pipeline. EPA Spokeswoman Maggie Carson said it is testing results from the Boneyard site have yet to be released, and Champaign city attorney Fred Stavins says the city is waiting on those results, and to find who's responsible for cleaning up the pipe.

In February, the Champaign city council recommended repealing its groundwater ordinance on a case-by-case basis. Stavins said the issue will re-surface by mid-April at the earliest.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - March 17, 2011

Conservative Group Launches Campaign to Encourage Rep. Johnson on Budget

The conservative group Americans For Prosperity says Illinois Congressman Tim Johnson needs to stay the course when it comes to balancing the federal budget.

Johnson can get the message by turning on his radio. A commercial running on Champaign-Urbana and Bloomington-Normal radio stations this month begins with the voice of the late Ronald Reagan: "You know, we could say they spend like drunken sailors. But that would be unfair to drunken sailors, because the sailors are spending their own money."

An announcer comes in to say that Reagan's words are still true today: "We cannot spend our way to prosperity. But big-government advocates are trying to convince Congressman Tim Johnson to go along with their high-tax, big-spending ways." The radio spot then goes on to urge listeners to call Congressman Johnson, and sign an online petition in favor of more federal spending cuts.

The Americans For Prosperity campaign is meant to convince Johnson, already known as a fiscal conservative, that he has the popular support to make difficult cuts in spending.

Joseph Calomino, AFP's Illinois State Director says Johnson has "voted right on many of the issues. Our theory is now, to provide those congressmen and women in the state of Illinois and throughout the country with the kind of support they need from the majority, to hear from the majority of their public to stand tall and cut spending now."

Americans For Prosperity announced their campaign Thursday at a Champaign news conference attended by representatives of other groups dedicated to lower government spending. They included Mary Lou Ferguson of the Decatur group, Citizens For Responsible Government. She says Americans largely support cuts in federal spending --- and will continue to do so when the choices get more difficult.

"That support we had last year for the election is not going away", says Ferguson. "That concern, that amount of energy and paying attention is going to grow. We just cannot sustain this. It has to be fixed."

A spokesman for Congressman Johnson says he's committed to cutting federal spending, and that the AFP campaign is "preaching to the choir". Press Secretary Phil Bloomer says Johnson has voted to reduce federal spending to 2008 levels, and voted against the latest continuing resolution to keep the federal government running --- because it didn't include sufficient spending cuts.

Meanwhile, Americans for Prosperity is launching similar campaigns in a few selected congressional districts across the country.

Categories: Economics, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - March 17, 2011

Indiana House Republican Leader Cuts Off Negotiations with Democrats

Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels says it is "sad but necessary'' for the Republican leader of the Indiana House to end negotiations with boycotting Democrats.

Daniels said Thursday that Democratic representatives have forfeited their right to participation by continuing to stay in Illinois in order to block legislative action.

Daniels says Republican Speaker Brian Bosma has bent over "double backward'' to meet unreasonable demands from Democrats on education- and labor-related bills.

Democratic Rep. Win Moses of Fort Wayne said there have been good communications on those issues and that ending talks would be an arbitrary and harsh choice by Bosma.

The legislative session is scheduled to end by late April, but Daniels said he was prepared to call a special session if necessary.

Categories: Economics, Government, Politics

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - March 17, 2011

Ebertfest Film Schedule Announced

Roger Ebert's Annual Film Festival opens Wednesday, April 27th, with a showing of the German science fiction film "Metropolis". Fritz Lang's silent classic has been shown at the festival before, but not in its new 2 1/2 hour restored version.

The five-day festival at Champaign's Virginia Theater will mostly feature newer movies, including "Louder Than A Bomb", a documentary tracking four Chicago-area kids preparing for a poetry slam. An appearance is scheduled by the movie's co-director, John Siskel --- a nephew of Ebert's former TV partner, the late Gene Siskel.

Other scheduled movies include "Me and Orson Welles", which dramatizes the director's early career; "Leaves of Grass" in which actor Edward Norton portrays twin brothers; and the animated "My Dog Tulip", featuring a voice performance by Christopher Plummer.

This will be the 13th year for Ebert's film festival, which highlights often-overlooked films selected by the Pulitizer-Prize winning film critic and Urbana native. Festival passes have sold out --- tickets for individual film showings go on sale April 4th.

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AP - Illinois Public Media News - March 17, 2011

Sun-Times boss, ISU grad Tyree dies at age 53

James C. Tyree, the Chicago businessman who helped lead Sun-Times Media Group Inc. out of bankruptcy, died Wednesday at age 53, company officials said.

Tyree died at a Chicago hospital following "an unexpected complication" from stomach cancer, according to Richard Price, president and chief operating officer of Chicago-based Mesirow Financial, a financial services company where Tyree was CEO, chairman and worked for more than three decades.

"Jim was truly one-of-a-kind; an amazing leader and great friend to so many," Price said in a statement. "He made an indelible impression on each one of us at Mesirow Financial, and our hearts are broken."

Tyree announced in October that he had stomach cancer and would undergo chemotherapy. Tyree also suffered from diabetes and had kidney and pancreas transplants in 2006.

In 2009, Tyree led an investment group that took the Chicago Sun-Times' parent company out of bankruptcy. Sun-Times Media, which also owns dozens of suburban Chicago newspapers and websites, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in March of that year, following months of cost-cutting measures.

The company's troubles played during the 2007 federal trial of Lord Conrad Black, the CEO of the Sun-Times' former owner, Hollinger International. Black was convicted of siphoning millions of dollars from Hollinger. The media company was sold to the investors led by Tyree for about $26.5 million.

"I certainly believe this is a good business opportunity, though certainly very risky," Tyree told The Associated Press in a 2009 interview.

Among other concessions, Tyree asked unions to agree to lock in 15 percent pay cuts that were originally intended to be temporary.

"It was his vision and effort that brought our company out of bankruptcy and gave us all the bright future that we have today," Sun-Times Media CEO Jeremy Halbreich said in a memo to employees. "We will miss Jim's counsel and leadership."

Tyree, who grew up on Chicago's South Side, took classes at City Colleges of Chicago while in high school before earning a bachelor's degree at Illinois State University in three years. He also earned a master's from the school. He worked as a forklift operator and used academic scholarships and grants to pay for his education.

Tyree joined Mesirow Financial in 1980, beginning as a research assistant and working his way up. He was named president in 1990 and chief executive in 1992.

Chicago Mayor Richard Daley appointed Tyree City College of Chicago chairman in 2000, a post he held for 10 years.

"As chairman of the board and former student of the Chicago City Colleges, he was a mentor to the students and a strong example of what can happen through hard work and perseverance," Daley said in a statement.

Tyree is survived by his wife and three children. No funeral plans have been announced.

Categories: Biography
Tags: media, people

AP - Illinois Public Media News - March 17, 2011

Indiana Lawmakers Debate Same-Sex Marriage, Civil Unions

Indiana lawmakers continue to debate a constitutional ban on same-sex marriage and civil unions.

Indiana law already prohibits marriage between same sex couples, but some Hoosier lawmakers want to take the ban a step further. They want to amend the state's constitution so the ban can't be overturned by what one legislator described as "activist judges."

The Indiana House approved the amendment last month and it moved on to the Senate. The Senate Judiciary Committee heard arguments on it yesterday at the Indiana Statehouse in Indianapolis. There, the committee heard from two prominent companies in Indiana; pharmaceutical maker Eli Lilly, and diesel engine manufacturer, Cummins Inc. Company representatives testified that a constitutional ban on same-sex marriage would hurt on recruiting top notch employees.

The committee delayed a vote on the matter until next week. If it's approved, it will move on the full Senate. And if it passes there, the amendment would still need to be approved by the Indiana General Assembly next year.

If the amendment makes it through next year's legislature, Hoosier voters will have the final say if it becomes part of the Indiana constitution by voting on the measure in a referendum.

The earliest such a ban could be in the constitution would be in 2013.


WILL - Illinois Public Media News - March 17, 2011

Champaign Native Living in Tokyo Reflects on Earthquake, Tsunami

When a devastating earthquake and tsunami hit Japan last week, Michael Bekiares was on the 19th floor of an office building in Tokyo. The building shook for 11 minutes during the quake. Bekiares grew up in Champaign and studied economics at the University of Illinois. He moved to Japan about 13 years ago for a job in finance, and now lives about 200 miles from the earthquake's epicenter. Illinois Public Media's Sean Powers spoke to Bekiares from Tokyo using Skype.

(Photo courtesy of Michael Bekiares)

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Categories: Biography, Energy, Technology

WILL - Illinois Public Media News - March 17, 2011

Raw Audio: Champaign Mayoral Candidates Hold First Debate

Champaign voters had the chance on Wednesday March, 16, 2011 to hear from the two candidates running for mayor. Current mayor Jerry Schweighart and political newcomer Don Gerard debated for about an hour at the Champaign Public Library. They addressed a range of issues from the economy to reducing youth violence.

Schweighart touted his efforts during his 12 years as mayor in maintaining a balanced budget without increasing property taxes. He also defended a proposal to cut overnight service in the lobby of the Champaign Police Department. Meanwhile, Gerard criticized those cuts saying they create a public safety risk. He said he would push for a financial audit on all city departments to improve Champaign's economy.

(Photo by Sean Powers/WILL)

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Categories: Government, Politics

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