From WILL - News Headlines -

Eatery Inspection Reports Are Tough to Get

Listen at 10:06 am on Tuesday to WILL-AM 580's "Focus" for a call-in program with area health officials.

About one in 10 restaurants in Champaign County failed a health inspection from April 2007 through April 2011, according to a review of inspection records by CU-CitizenAccess.org.

But customers have no easy way of knowing just how sanitary the places at which they eat really are.

Take, for example, Geovanti's Bar & Grill, which failed public health inspections five times from September 2008 through February of this year.

But no one who eats there would ever know, unless they requested copies of the Campustown restaurant's inspection reports from the local public health district.

That's because - unlike many other counties and cities in central Illinois and across the country - the Champaign-Urbana Public Health District currently doesn't publicize the results of its restaurant inspections in any form. Not online, not on placards at restaurants and not in local newspapers.

This means the public has no way way of knowing about health-code violations, such as the live and dead cockroaches found during a November 2009 inspection at Geovanti's.

Owner Anthony Donato said the restaurant works closely with the district to make sure it meets health codes. Geovanti's recently had a voluntary health inspection and passed with flying colors, he said.

Julie Pryde, the district's public health administrator, said the fact that a restaurant is open for business shows eating there is safe.

"If you go into a restaurant and it's open, we've been in there, and they've passed," Pryde said. "And there are times where you'll go to a restaurant, and it will not be open. It may not say, 'Closed by the health department' on the front door, but if it's not open, that's because there's an immediate health risk."

Pryde and other public health officials have long said they want to make information about inspections of the county's more than 1,000 eating establishments more available to the public. They believe providing diners with access to complete restaurant inspection reports will give them the information they need to make the best decisions for their health.

But, after years of talk, they still have not done so.

Since getting new software to manage inspection reports in 2007, they have spoken about plans for a website that would allow consumers to look up the records online.

In 2008, environmental health director Jim Roberts said he hoped to have the site up the following year.

This spring, he said they were shooting for September. In late August, he revised the time line once again.

"I would hope by January 2012," Roberts said.

He said there are several reasons for the delays.

"First, we had to make sure the system was working as we wanted it to," Roberts said. "The second thing is that I don't have a project manager to do this, so I do this as time permits me to do so."

Meanwhile, since 2003, neighboring Vermilion County has taken the low-tech route of requiring restaurant owners to post letter grades from their most recent inspections in their establishments alongside their health permits.

Douglas Toole is the environmental health director in Vermilion County.

"It's a lot about informing the public," Toole said. "When they go into a restaurant, the public can see the dining area, certainly, and they can see what the restrooms look like and they can see, depending on the place, a small amount of the food-preparation or food-storage area. But a lot of it takes place behind the scenes."

While Vermilion County officials see this as a way of providing the public with information they're entitled to see under the state's Freedom of Information Act, Champaign-Urbana's Julie Pryde see the letter grades differently.

"It's completely worthless," Pryde said.

She said when people see a letter grade, they don't bother to find out what went into earning that grade.

"If you only are looking at one thing, A, I think it will give people a false sense of security, and, B, it might negatively impact a restaurant's business when there's no point in it," Pryde said."Give them all the information or no information at all."

Illinois law doesn't require health departments to publish inspection results online or in hardcopy. But Vermillion isn't the only area county the takes the initiative to make its scores public.

McLean, Macon and Sangamon counties all post inspections scores on their websites.

Manny Martinez is executive chef of Destihl Restaurant and Brew Works, which has locations in Champaign and Normal. Inspection scores for the Normal restaurant are posted on the McLean County Health Department website.

The scores can be deceiving because they don't tell customers whether a restaurant lost points for major violations or for several minor violations that might have little to do with sanitation, Martinez said.

But overall, he doesn't mind the information being available to the public.

"For a restaurant, it doesn't really matter to us, as long as we know we're doing a good job, and we get inspected and we're doing a great job," he said.

How to Obtain a Restaurant Inspection Report

The public can obtain copies inspection reports for specific restaurants by calling the Champaign-Urbana Public Health District's Environmental Health Division at (217) 373-7900, emailing eh@c-uphd.org or visiting the district's offices at 201 W. Kenyon Road, Champaign.

Depending on the number of reports being sought, you may be asked to file a Freedom of Information request with one of the district's Freedom of Information officers:

Patricia Robison

Freedom of Information Officer

Address: 201 W. Kenyon Road

Champaign, IL 61820

Phone: (217) 531-4257

Fax: (217) 531-4343

Email: probinson@c-uphd.org

Tammy Hamilton

Deputy Freedom of Information Officer

Address: 201 W. Kenyon Road

Champaign, IL 61820

Phone: (217) 531-2905

Fax: (217) 373-7905

Email: thamilton@c-uphd.org

Linda Smith

Deputy Freedom of Information Officer

Address: 201 W. Kenyon Road Champaign, IL 61820

Phone: (217) 531-4265

Fax: (217) 531-4343

Email: lsmith@c-uphd.org

Categories: Business, Health