From AP - News Headlines -

Ethics Reform Passes, “Fumigation” Bill Stalls, No One’s Happy

An historic measure to limit campaign contributions in Illinois is headed to Governor Pat Quinn's desk, despite criticism it does little to actually curb the flow of campaign money.

Quinn admits the measure is flawed, but backs it anyway, saying it's the best the state can get right now.

Critics say there are too many loopholes. Representative Bill Black, a Danville Republican, says one of the biggest flaws is a lack of limits on so-called in-kind contributions. "That means those people who control the committee funds can use unlimited contributions to hire staff, lease computers, pay the rent on an office, buy hundreds of thousands of dollars of campaign commercials," Black said on the House floor.

Meantime, the Senate failed to act on another reform measure the governor has called a top priority. The proposal would allow voters to decide to change the state constitution so an unpopular governor could be recalled.

But critics say the measure would put too much power in the hands of lawmakers. At least 30 lawmakers, with equal support from both parties, would have to sign off. So either party could block a recall effort. Critics also say other statewide elected officials should be eligible for recall.

Meanwhile, a legislative purge of state workers is not going forward after all. For now, state employees and commission members who could have lost their posts are safe.

The Illinois House overwhelmingly approved a plan to "fumigate" state government of people hired under disgraced former Governors George Ryan and Rod Blagojevich. Anyone current Governor Pat Quinn chose to keep on could stay, but otherwise the legislation would have fired seven hundred fifty of these political hires.

But when Senators took up the measure they voiced opposition. Republican Dan Cronin of Elmhurst called it a power grab. "It's irrelevant whether or not you had any connection whatsoever to Governor Blagojevich," Cronin said. "We're going to tell you that you're fired because we can. And you gotta come hat in hand, back into the office, come kiss the ring."

Senate President John Cullerton says in lieu of that criticism, he pulled the measure before Senators could take a vote, leaving open the opportunity to try again later. "I think there's some real confusion as to what it does, and I didn't want to rush into that until we make sure everybody understands what it is," Cullerton said.

House Speaker Mike Madigan drafted the measure. Madigan says it's needed to rid Illinois of anyone who abetted the former Governors' corrupt practices.