Illinois Public Media News

AP - Illinois Public Media News - September 10, 2009

Despite Economy, MAP Grant Worries, EIU Enrollment “Optimum

An administrator at Eastern Illinois University says enrollment there remains strong, despite economic struggles and the uncertain future of Illinois' Monetary Awards Program, or MAP grants. Just four shy of the optimum enrollment of 12,000 are taking courses on the Charleston campus this fall. Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Blair Lord says the numbers show that students realize the importance of a higher education. He says nearly a quarter of EIU's undergraduate population depends on MAP Grants. Just over 12,000 students attended the school a year ago.

Categories: Education
Tags: education

AP - Illinois Public Media News - September 10, 2009

UI, Grad Employees Continue Talks Amid Rally

University of Illinois negotiators and members of the union that represents graduate student employees held another bargaining session Wednesday.

Graduate Employees Organization members aren't happy with the direction talks are going -- they protested outside the Levis Faculty Center, where negotiations continued with the help of a federal mediator. The grad students' previous contract expired last month.

Carrie Pimblott is the GEO's lead negotiator. She calls the university's proposal for no raises over three years unacceptable - in fact, she claims most union requests are being rejected.

"They came back and said all of the proposals we had suggested that were monetary were untenable because they didn't have the money to do it. And a lot of our non-monetary issues they rejected for various reasons," Pimblott said. "Essentially they came back with a lot of very egregious proposals that not only rejected our central values but suggested that they would want to erode our grievance rights, erode our rights as union workers."

U of I spokeswoman Robin Kaler says they won't comment on negotiations while they're in progress.

Pimblott says the GEO wants to put pressure on the university through rallies - she says a labor action is not out of the question.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - September 10, 2009

U of I Board Meets Thursday to Choose New Officers and Approve Admission Reform

The September 10th meeting of the University of Illinois Board of Trustees in Urbana will not be business as usual. The board is meeting for the first time since Governor Pat Quinn appointed six new members --- and reappointed a 7th --- in the wake of the admissions scandal. Quinn himself will make a rare appearance at the trustees' meeting. And the board is scheduled to vote on a resolution putting the stamp of approval on admissions reforms called for by the governor's Admissions Review Commission.

U of I spokesman Tom Hardy says the first directive of the resolution is the elimination of Category I --- the infamous list of applicants with political connections --- and a ban on anything resembling it.

"We've done away with Category I", says Hardy. "But this says that anything that might appear or seem to take its place --- whether you call it something else --- anything like that tracking list would be out of bounds."

The resolution also calls for setting up written criteria for admissions that are readily accessible to all, and creating a new code of conduct for admissions that will help create a firewall that insulates admissions officers from unwarranted interference.

Hardy says these are the directives President B. Joseph White gave the administration at a special meeting last month, in line with recommendations from the Governor's Admissions Review Commission. White's goal is to have the reforms in place by the start of the new admissions cycle on September 23rd.

WILL will broadcast the U of I Board of Trustees meeting live, beginning at 9, on AM 580, FM 90.9 HD 2 and HD 3, and online at will.illinois.edu. .

Categories: Education, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - September 09, 2009

Rantoul Township HS Students Face “Soft Lockdown

Rantoul Township High School will be on a 'soft lockdown' for a second day Wednesday after two recent fights and the arrests of several students.

Superintendent Janet Koroscik says there were about five arrests following two fights outside the school on Friday. And Tuesday, Rantoul Police removed three students from the building when knives were discovered on them. The knives were found as officers went from room to room, bringing students out individually to search them. Officers and school administrators also searched backpacks and lockers. That was prompted after a rumor surfaced that a student would bring a gun to school Tuesday.

Koroscik says the fights could be connected to gang activity... noting the incidents have involved many of the same individuals. But she says they're a poor reflection of the majority of the student body:

"I really want to ensure everyone that the small group of individuals whose behavior is certainly inappropriate in no way reflects on the larger portion of our population who has amazing behavior," Koroscik said. "This is a great place to be and we want to make sure we keep it that way."

Rantoul Township High School has 787 students.

Koroscik says during a soft lockdown, no students are allowed to leave the classroom unless they're accompanied by a teacher or administrator. And extra staff and administrators are monitoring the hallways in between classes.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - September 09, 2009

Former Blagojevich Fundraiser Pleads Guilty to Fraud

Ousted Gov. Rod Blagojevich's former chief fundraiser pleaded guilty Tuesday to swindling two major airlines as part of an $8.5 million fraud arising from hangar roofing contracts at O'Hare International Airport.

Under his signed plea, 51-year-old Christopher G. Kelly will be sentenced to 57 months in prison. As chief of the Friends of Rod Blagojevich, Kelly bankrolled the now impeached Democrat's rise to the governor's office.

The sentence comes on top of a 37-month federal prison term Kelly must serve after pleading guilty to charges in an unrelated tax-fraud scheme.

Kelly still faces charges as a co-defendant in the same federal indictment that alleges Blagojevich sought to sell or trade President Obama's former seat in the U.S. Senate.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - September 09, 2009

Urbana City Council Rejects Urbanastand Art Proposal

It was to be an array of newspaper vending boxes that would also be a work of art. But the Urbana City Council decided Tuesday night to go with just the vending boxes.

Local artist Frederic Beaugeard's "Urbanastand" would have gone up outside the Champaign County Courthouse, combining newspaper vending boxes with displays of historic headlines from old Champaign-Urbana newspapers, . The project would have cost the city of Urbana more than 60-thousand dollars. Mayor Laurel Prussing persuaded the city council to go with something plainer for about 4-thousand dollars.

"We're just going to buy a commercially available newsstand," says Prussing, "which was going to be the centerpiece of the artwork anyway.and so we'll have a nice looking place for people to buy newspapers. Right now there's kind of a jumble of little news dispensers that are falling over each other and falling down."

Alderman Charlie Smyth proposed last month that private donations could pay for most of the cost of Urbanastand. On Tuesday night, he said that was still possible, but only if someone steps in soon to either pay for the project, or organize a fundraising drive.

Meanwhile, the Urbana City Council will now use 9-thousand dollars from money budgeted for Urbanastand to help erect a sculpture near the city building that's been planned for the last 20 years. The city's contribution will help match private donations for John David Mooney's steel sculpture, which incorporates LED lighting. The city's contribution will help match private donations.

Categories: Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - September 08, 2009

Chamapign Officials Discuss New Policing Strategy

Champaign Police want to hear from neighborhoods in order to gear more officers towards crime prevention strategies.

Police Chief R-T Finney will discuss the strategy of 'problem-oriented policing' in the department's annual report before the Champaign City Council tonight. He says the discussions with residents in the past year have ranged from town-hall meetings with neighborhood associations to those focused on one or two blocks. Finney says the complaints start with traffic, but become more specific:

"They'll begin to point out issues other than speeding that really need to be addressed, said Finney. "Some of those issues are drug houses, inattentive landlords who are allowing crimes to occur in their houses, parks that may be affected by certain types of crimes. It may be something like a burglary spree that is occurring in a particular neighborhood."

Finney says often, the solution is as simple as putting up a fence at one home or increasing patrols at a business that sees more service calls.

He says the economy has forced the department to be creative as it shifts officers toward neighborhoods with greater problems. Problem-oriented policing started with meetings in the Garden Hills neighborhood and later moved to homes in the Hill and Church streets areas. Finney says he expects several more neighborhoods will come forth with concerns following tonight's presentation.


AP - Illinois Public Media News - September 08, 2009

Faculty Group Welcomes Trustees, Meeting; Still Wants Input

One day after University of Illinois trustees meet to reorganize the board this week, they'll meet with faculty representatives. So says a member of the Urbana campus' Academic Senate, who says he's impressed with Governor Quinn's picks for trustees posts from last week. Still, Nick Burbules says the Governor ought to meet with faculty when he makes future trustee appointments.

"Everything I've heard about the new members is outstanding," Burbules said. "But as always, we're as much concerned with process as the outcome, and I think we're going to continue to work to trying to urge closer consultation with faculty governance about how these decisions get made in the future."

Burbules says the board of trustees is scheduled to meet with faculty members on Friday to discuss ways to reform the U of I's admissions process. Irregularities in that system led most of the previous trustees to resign after a recommendation from the governor's admissions review commission.

Categories: Education, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - September 04, 2009

More Details on Gov. Quinn’s Selections for UI Trustees

Governor Pat Quinn says the five new trustees he appointed to the University of Illinois board are committed to making sure the school's reputation is "second to none.'' Quinn named the five Friday to fill spots that were vacated when other trustees resigned amid an admissions scandal at the school.

One group that's happy with Governor Quinn's trustee selections is the leadership of the U of I Alumni Association. President and CEO Loren Taylor says four of the five appointees came from a list of candidates the association had provided the governor. The fifth had also been endorsed by some alumni, and Taylor says that candidate is a fine choice too. Quinn didn't pick U of I alumni for his first two appointments, Chris Kennedy and Lawrence Oliver. But Taylor says that didn't faze him. "Our experience in working with the governor was that he would want to consider strongly the recommendations that we had made, so we just felt we needed to be patient," says Taylor. "I think that's paid off." He says the alumni group received interest from about 400 people when the call went out for trustee candidates.

One new trustee hopes the newly-reconstituted board can get the admissions scandal behind it as soon as possible. But former Springfield mayor Karen Hasara says she needs more background into the controversy before she makes any decisions on the fate of President Joseph White and Urbana Chancellor Richard Herman. She enters the trustee's job with 17 years of political office behind her, as a state legislator and as Springfield's former mayor. She says that's prepared her for the scrutiny she'll face in the coming weeks. "I don't particularly like negative things being said but I have gotten to be pretty thick skinned," says Hasara. "So I think I'll be able to get through it okay."

One trustee who voluntarily resigned and was passed over for re-appointment by the governor says Quinn misled him and other now-former trustees. David Dorris turned in his resignation last month along with three other members. Only one, Quinn appointee Ed McMillan, was re-appointed. Two trustees who refused to step down are still on the board. Dorris says he doesn't regret his decision to quit because staying in place would have heaped even more public scorn on him and the University. But he accuses Quinn of making a purely political decision not to fire James Montgomery and Frances Carroll.

"What is very disgusting is the fact that he had made such strong statements and we were all told, in no uncertain terms, that if we did not resign he would forcibly remove us," says Dorris. "I don't know how that man can ever explain away his decision to back down against the two." Dorris worries that a board of trustees with six new members won't have the institutional knowledge to run effectively, and they'll vote for a new chairman without knowing each other. Neither Quinn nor his office has returned many calls from WILL seeking comment.

Categories: Education, Government, Politics

AP - Illinois Public Media News - September 04, 2009

New UI Trustees Named

Gov. Pat Quinn has filled five positions on the University of Illinois board of trustees.

The trustees named Friday are all university graduates. The new members are former Springfield Mayor Karen Hasara, Rockford Dr. Timothy Koritz, retired Exelon executive Pamela Strobel and Carlos Tortolero, president of the National Museum of Mexican Art.

Quinn also reappointed Edward McMillan, a businessman from Greenville who resigned from the board this summer.

The governor's moves Friday follow last week's appointments of Christopher Kennedy and Lawrence Oliver II.

Seven trustees stepped down following reports that political connections played a role in some admissions to the university. James Montgomery and Frances Carroll refused calls to resign.

Categories: Education, Government, Politics

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