November 01, 2012

Ethical Chic: The Inside Story of the Companies We Think We Love

There are many reasons to purchase goods or services from one company over another: price, quality, and convenience. But sometimes, the decision is a moral one; we seek out businesses we believe support or represent our world view – or avoid those that defy it. (The debate earlier this summer over Chick-Fil-A was a demonstration of both).

At the heart of such decisions is whether we deem a company to be socially responsible. But how do you really know? How can you be sure that a reputation is accurate and deserved? And what if the truth is mixed – what if a company leads on one ethical precept, but falls short on another?

Journalist Fran Hawthorne has contemplated these questions, and set out to uncover whether some of the most beloved, trusted companies who have built up a socially responsible reputation really live up to the hype. In the book Ethical Chic: The Inside Story of the Companies We Think We Love, Hawthorne takes us behind the scenes of companies with powerful brand loyalty, companies like Tom’s of Maine, Starbucks, and Apple. Along the way, Hawthorne finds out why these companies have earned seemingly unflagging devotion from socially conscious consumers. And she calls out the companies and consumers alike with a provocative question: Is it really about being socially conscious, or just looking like you are?

This is a repeat broadcast from Tuesday, September 04, 2012, 10 am

Listen

October 23, 2012

"9 Billion People + 1 Earth = ?"

Andrew Revkin, Senior Fellow at Pace University and Dot Earth blogger for The New York Times

Host: Craig Cohen

After two centuries of explosive growth, the planet's population is widely seen as cresting within the next couple of generations. A best guess for the peak remains roughly 9 billion people. There are even signs that resource-sapping activities will hit a peak as well. Will we overheat or innovate, conserve or despoil, crash or round the curve with a few scrapes? Andrew Revkin, Dot Earth blogger for the New York Times, explores ways to shape and share ideas that can foster progress on a finite planet.

Listen

September 12, 2012

The Environment and Human Health and Well-Being

William Sullivan, Professor / BLA Curriculum Committee Chair Department of Landscape Architecture, University of Illinois

Frances Kuo, Associate Professor, Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences, College of ACES, University of Illinois

Host: Craig Cohen

Research in recent years has indicated a possible connection between people's health and well-being, and the environment around them. From elderly people tending to live longer when they live close to a park, to children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder displaying fewer symptoms afer spending time in nature. And then there are people who live in urban settings, without trees and grass. Research has indicated they tend to be more violent and aggressive.

So is it as simple as the more trees around you, the healthier, more productive, and happier you are? Or do we just happen to seek out places to live and work that reflect the personalities we already have, so peaceful, socially engaged people seek out trees, while more aggressive, intense people naturally prefer a big city? Are there other factors at play? Just what is the connection between our environment and our ability to interact, learn, and live healthy?

Listen

August 20, 2012

Visit Sunny Chernobyl and Other Adventures in the world's Most Polluted Places

Andrew Blackwell, Journalist

Host: David Inge

What’s your idea of the ideal travel destination? A pristine beach? A city with a cultural site on every corner? Writer Andrew Blackwell decided he would travel to the places nobody wants to visit, places where the air, soil and water were toxic. In the process, he takes eco-tourism into an entirely new place. Blackwell takes us on a tour of some of the world’s most polluted places. That’s the subject of his new book "Visit Sunny Chernobyl."

This is a repeat broadcast from Thursday, June 28, 2012, 10 am

Listen

August 03, 2012

Powering The Dream: The History and Promise of Green Technology

Alexid Madrigal, a Senior Editor, The Atlantic

Host: David Inge

In 1900, people could use the sun to heat water for their homes. They could ride across New York City in an electric cab. In 1945 you could have bought a solar home or a one-megawatt wind turbine. Green technology has been viable for more than a century, so…why aren’t we using it? Our guest will be Alexis Madrigal, senior editor at the Atlantic and author of "Powering the Dream." His book explores the history of green technology, and argues that history has the potential to reshape the way we think about energy today.

This is a repeat broadcast from Wednesday, January 25, 2012, 11 am

Listen

July 05, 2012

Love, Life, and Elephants: An African Love Story

We’ll talk with Kenyan author and conservationist Dame Daphne Sheldrick. For 20 years beginning in the mid 1950s, she was co-warden, along with her husband David, of Kenya’s Tsavo National Park. She is the first person ever to have successfully hand-raised newborn elephants, and rehabilitated many different animals, including rhinos and zebras. She will share  stories from her African childhood and her 50 years of work in the field of wildlife conservation. That’s the subject of her memoir "Love, Life and Elephants."

This is a repeat broadcast from Monday, May 07, 2012, 11 am

Listen

Page 1 of 18 pages  1 2 3 > Last ›