Julia Sweeney
Wikimedia Commons
April 22, 2013

Julia Sweeney

As a parent, how do you talk to your kids about the birds and the bees? That very conversation inspired Julia Sweeney’s new book “If It’s Not One Thing, It’s Your Mother.” She joins us live today on Focus!

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Sasha Cagen
February 14, 2013

Quirky Alone: Single by Choice

Think Valentine’s Day is overrated? We’ve got an alternative. During this episode of Focus, host Craig Cohen talked with Sasha Cagen, the founder of the QuirkyAlone movement about why it’s okay to resist the idea that being single means being lonely. Find the podcast here

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Ben and Timmy McClelland
January 22, 2013

International Adoption in Illinois

The Russian government recently instituted a controversial ban on adoptions to the United States. Outcry from both families in the middle of the adoption process with Russia and families who have previously adopted from the country has been harsh.

This hour on Focus, host Craig Cohen talks Kris McClelland, a mother from Peoria who has adopted two boys from Siberia, Russia, about her experiences in Russian orphanages and as an adoptive mother. We’ll also be joined by Director of Adoption for Illini Christian Ministries Maria Gocke and Russian Program Director for Christian World Adoption Anya Rutherford to talk about the adoption process and the politics involved.

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January 02, 2013

Making and Keeping New Year's Resolutions

The start of the new year inspires many to set goals and make resolutions.  What do we know about human behavior that can help us turn our goals into achievements?  What are some of the tools available to us?  How can we solicit a community of friends for support to help us be accountable for our goals and to cheer us on when we want to give up or to remind us that we can start anew, no matter where we are in the new year?  We invite you to share your resolutions and what's helped you stick with them.

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August 21, 2012

Encore: The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

Guest: Rebecca Skloot.

She was a poor black tobacco farmer whose cells—taken without her knowledge in 1951—would become one of the most important tools of modern medicine, used to develop the polio vaccine, gene mapping, cloning, and more. Today on Focus, Rebecca Skloot joins the show to tell the story of Henrietta Lacks, the medical revolution that she unknowingly launched, and the ethics one must consider when it comes to our bodies and medicine.

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August 17, 2012

The Accordian Family: Boomerang Kids, Anxious Parents, and the Private Toll of Global Competition

Katherin S. Newman, Ph.D., James B. Knapp Dean of the Zanvyl Kieger School of Arts and Sciences, Johns Hopkins University

Host: David Inge

In the U.S. and in other affluent nations, growing numbers of young adults in their 20s and 30s are living with their parents. Sociologist Katherine Newman says that while this kind of doubling-up has long been seen in families that were less well-off, the middle class has never before needed to provide a long-term economic safety net for their grown children. We’ll explore this change with Katherine Newman, author of "The Accordion Family." The book looks at the ways global economic conditions have redefined family life.

This is a repeat broadcast from Wednesday, June 20, 2012, 10 am

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August 02, 2012

Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity

Katherine Boo, Staff Writer, The New Yorker; Pulitzer Prize Winner

Host: David Inge

Pulitzer Prize-winner Katherine Boo has written about the dramatic and sometimes heartbreaking story of families striving toward a better life in one of the 21st century’s great, unequal cities. Her book "Behind the Beautiful Forevers" is based on three years of uncompromising reporting.

This is a repeat broadcast from Monday, February 20, 2012, 11 am

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June 20, 2012

The Accordion Family: Boomerang Kids, Anxious Parents, and the Private Toll of Global Competition

Katherine S. Newman, Ph.D., James B. Knapp Dean of The Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, Johns Hopkins University

Host: David Inge
 

In the U.S. and in other affluent nations, growing numbers of young adults in their 20s and 30s are living with their parents. Sociologist Katherine Newman says that while this kind of doubling-up has long been seen in families that were less well-off, the middle class has never before needed to provide a long-term economic safety net for their grown children. We’ll explore this change with Katherine Newman, author of "The Accordion Family." The book looks at the ways global economic conditions have redefined family life.

Listen

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