A boy and a girl in shallow water at the edge of a river. The girl has a dip net and bucket.

Rob Kanter

Environmental Almanac - June 07, 2018

Stand up for the Middle Fork

The Middle Fork of the Vermilion River needs protection--tune in to learn what you can do to help.

A snapping turtle crosses a road

Rob Kanter

Environmental Almanac - June 01, 2018

Appreciating Common Snapping Turtles [from the archive]

Two kinds of snapping turtles occur in North America, and both of them can be found in Illinois. Alligator snappers, which most people will never see, are listed as endangered, and they inhabit only larger rivers and streams in the southern part of the state, the Mississippi, Ohio and Wabash Rivers, and tributaries directly connected to them. In fact, no wild alligator snapping turtle was documented in Illinois for the thirty years between 1984 and 2014, when scientists from the Illinois Natural History Survey discovered one.

Tight shot of a gray squirrel perched on the edge of a dumpster. It's holding a half-eaten pancake in its front paws.

Rob Kanter

Environmental Almanac - May 17, 2018

In defense of the eastern gray squirrel [from the archive]

Despite their heedless ways and the dangers posed to them by human traffic, squirrels are in no danger of extinction--so why do they deserve our attention? Tune in for an answer from University of Illinois student Laura Schultz.

Rob Kanter

Environmental Almanac - March 08, 2018

Your Neighbor the Coyote

No mammal that thrives in human-dominated landscapes is more misunderstood that the coyote. Tune in to get the facts about these amazing creatures.

Rob Kanter

Environmental Almanac - March 02, 2018

Appreciating Illinois amphibians and the habitats that support them

It may be too early in the year to contemplate April showers bringing May flowers. But in much of Illinois heavy rains in late February and early March trigger an astonishing and ancient natural phenomenon—the annual congregation of amphibians in the waters where they breed.

Head shot of a bull moose with antlers half-grown.

Rob Kanter

Environmental Almanac - February 15, 2018

Moose, winter ticks, and climate change in New Hampshire [from the archive]

The statewide moose population in New Hampshire peaked at about 7,400 animals in the 1990s, but even then, moose numbers in the north country never reached levels biologists had anticipated the habitat could support. Why weren’t there more of them? And why did their numbers then begin dropping off?

Symplocarpus foetidus, or Skunk Cabbage, growing out of snow

Rob Kanter

Environmental Almanac - February 08, 2018

Get out soon to find the first flower of spring

People who go looking for beauty in the woodlands of central Illinois tend to get excited about the months of April and May, when showy beauties like Virginia bluebells carpet the woodland floor. But if you wait until April to get out, you may already be a month late for the emergence of the first flower of spring.

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