Gov. Rauner Apologizes To Quincy Veterans; Benedictine Wisdom For Today; Standing Rock Gallery

October 18, 2018

Andrew Gill/WBEZ

On the 21st: Last week during a gubernatorial debate in Quincy, Governor Rauner made his first apology to the families who lost loved ones to Legionnaires’ Disease at the Quincy veterans’ home. We’ll hear more about that debate and the state Attorney General’s criminal investigation into the the way the governor’s administration handled this outbreak. Plus, revisit our conversation with Bloomington writer Judy Valente about how wisdom from the sixth century can apply to today. And, we preview a photography exhibit at the American Indian Center of Chicago about the protests at Standing Rock. 

Last week during a gubernatorial debate in Quincy, Governor Rauner made his first apology to the families who lost loved ones to Legionnaires’ Disease at the Quincy veterans’ home. This was the final governor’s debate. 

Twelve families are suing the state for neglect over the deaths of their family members. In addition, Attorney General Lisa Madigan is pursuing a criminal investigation into whether Rauner and his administration violated any laws in the way it responded to the disease.

WBEZ has been following this story for almost a year, and we were joined by reporters Dave McKinney and Tony Arnold. 

Plus- 

How can wisdom from a 6th century saint apply to America 2018? That’s the question that motivates Judy Valente.

You might recognize her name. She’s a long time reporter, most recently she’s been with our partner station WGLT in Bloomington Normal.

Her latest book is called How to Live: What the Rule of St. Benedict Teaches Us About Happiness, Meaning and Community.

And- 

In 2016, and throughout the beginning of 2017, thousands gathered in North Dakota to protest the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Many people from the Standing Rock Indian Reservation considered the pipeline a threat to clean water and to their sacred land. Led by Native communities, the camps by the pipeline site grew to thousands and became as a center for resistance and cultural preservation.

Michigan photographer Levi Rickert was also there. Now, his photos will be featured as part of an new Chicago exhibit at the American Indian Center. It’s called, Standing Rock: Photos of an Indigenous Movement. It will be at the American Indian Center from Oct. 19 to Nov. 9. 

Levi Rickert joined us on the line. He’s also the publisher and editor of Native News Online. Dave Spencer also joined us. He’s the development and arts coordinator for the American Indian Center.