Update on Illinois Men Accused of Bombing; Evictions in Decatur; Illinois Politics Update

May 23, 2018
Teresa Crawford/AP

On The 21st: In Illinois, 1.58 percent of renters were evicted in 2016. But in Decatur, the rate is double that. What's behind this trend? Plus, we get our weekly Illinois politics update from Brian Mackey. But first, we give you an update on the case of three central Illinois men accused of bombing a Minnesota mosque last summer who are now facing new federal charges.

Three central Illinois men accused of bombing a Minnesota mosque last summer are now facing new federal charges. A grand jury alleges the three men along with another Illinois local put another bomb on railroad tracks near Effingham in Southern Illinois.

This incident is just the latest allegation against these men. In a strange and complicated saga, Michael Hari, Michael McWhorter, Joe Morris and Ellis Mack have been involved with various charges involving conspiracy, robbing, arsen, assault and violence.

We were joined by Minnesota Public Radio Reporter Matt Sepic who’s been following the Minnesota bombing case.

 

Plus- 

When it comes to basic needs, rent is one of the biggest and can often be the most challenging.

If you’re not able to make ends meet, and maybe you fall behind on rent, eviction is, of course, the worst-case scenario. For the first time, we’re getting comprehensive data on what evictions look like all over the country. This is based on information collected by Princeton University.

Here in Illinois, 1.58 percent of renters were evicted in 2016. But in Decatur, the rate is double that.

We were joined on the line by Tom Lisi, who’s reported on this for the Decatur Herald and Review. Bob Palmer also joined us. He’s the policy director for Housing Action Illinois. 

Jerry Pelz also spoke with us. He’s the executive director at the Northeast Community Fund which is a faith-based social service agency  based in Decatur.

Also- 

State Rep. Kelly Cassidy is saying that House Speaker Michael Madigan retaliated against her after she spoke out against him - and she had no choice but to resign.

We like to talk about state politics at least once a week here on the show. And one of our favorite guides into that sometimes confusing world is Illinois Public Radio statehouse reporter Brian Mackey.