WILLAg Notes

May 04, 2015

Can Herbicide of Choice Still be Used Post Planting

The fast pace of corn planting in the state of Illinois has farmers and chemical applicators racing one another across the fields. University of Illinois Extension Weed Scientist Aaron Hager has this advise for farmers wondering what to do if the corn was planted before their residual herbicides were applied.


You may read Aaron Hager's thoughts on weeds and herbicides on The Bulletin website.


April 29, 2015

2015 Gross Revenues for Corn Using RP85% + ARC Co

A University of Illinois Ag Economist has back figured how the new farm program would have performed over the last 40 growing seasons when coupled to crop insurance. The calculations can be used as a guidepost to 2015 farm incomes.



The exercise coupled RP crop insurance at the 85% level to the ARC County farm program to see how it would have supplemented farm income on a highly productive central Illinois farm located in Logan County. The numbers were run for crop years starting in 1975 all the way through 2014 says Gary Schnitkey. He’s an ag economist at the University of Illinois and explains, to begin with, how this combination would have handled the years farmer are most likely to remember; 1980, 83, 88, and 2012.

Quote Summary - So those are the drought years, and while in 1988 we didn’t have the crop insurance products we do now, we can figure what income would have looked like if a producer had purchased RP at the 85% level and took ARC County. Those years would not be bad from a gross revenue stand point. Crop revenues would be low, but crop insurance and ARC County payments would bring those back so that if, for instance 2015 looked like 1988 or 2012, the gross income would be at the top end of our distribution over the 40 year period.

Yields and prices in each of the 40 years are calculated using 2015 projections, but the actual year offsets. 2012, then. would show a lower actual price (because this years crop insurance price is lower than 2012’s) but a higher actual yield. Essentially you pick a year, adjust for 2015, and calculate the gross income.
 


The middle point (where the distribution is not quite evenly split above and below but close) is $828 per acre. The low revenue year forecasts correlate mostly with trend yields and lower corn prices. So, with a somewhat normal growing season that has below average prices. That could be caused by large residual supplies, big carryouts, or by poor demand.

Quote Summary - Poorer demand or something along that lines. Those types of years will be the ones that cause low revenues in 2015.

The ten middle years of the set project 2015 gross revenues from $825 to $831 per acre for corn. They were each characterized by harvest prices and yields relatively close to expected levels - the February crop insurance price and trend yield. Those years include 1984, 1990, 1991, 1996, 2002, and 2009.

Link to original FarmDocDaily article


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