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A screen shows the winners as members of the Nobel Assembly announce the winner of the 2015 Nobel Prize in physics, in Stockholm Tuesday
Fredrik Sandberg/TT via AP
News Local/State

U of I Prof’s Research Led To Nobel Prize In Physics

U of I Physics Professor Mark Neubauer earned his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania, where his research nearly 15 years ago played a role in Tuesday's Nobel Prize in Physics. 

The Illinois State Capitol building in Springfield, Ill.
Brian Mackey/IPR
News Local/State

Amid Budget Impasse, Universities Hurting But See Some Good In Rauner Plan

Illinois public colleges and universities have become collateral damage in the state’s months-long budget impasse, fueled by political stalemate between Illinois’ Republican Governor Bruce Rauner and the Democratically controlled General Assembly. Rauner says he’s willing to consider more state revenue to pay for support to items like public colleges and universities…but only if the Democratically controlled General Assembly passes his pro-business, union-weakening “Turnaround Agenda “ first.

A water tower on the Eastern Illinois University campus.
Hannah Meisel/Illinois Public Media
News Local/State

Higher Education Officials: Lack Of State Budget Is Crippling Operations

Leaders of several state universities and community colleges are sounding the alarm as they begin month three of receiving no money from Illinois. State support for Illinois’ 12 public universities and its 49 community colleges is the largest part of the state government that isn’t being funded during Springfield’s budget impasse.

Gov. Bruce Rauner talks with media after celebrating the opening of a new Veterans Center on the U of I campus Oct. 2. Rauner appeared at U of I the day after college presidents sent the governor a letter asking for state support of universities.
Hannah Meisel/Illinois Public Media
News Local/State

Rauner Blames Democrats For Three Months Of No Funding For Colleges

Though Illinois has gone over three months without a budget, to the average citizen, state government seems anything but shut down. Court orders and existing law have made it possible for the largest chunks of the state's financial obligations to be paid...except for the state's 12 public colleges and universities.