Mid-American Gardener: acid soil, lichen, planting processes, garlic mustard and more

May 01, 2014

Horticulture specialist Dianne Noland and her guest garden panelists Jennifer Fishburn, Don White and Chuck Voigt take on the challenge of answering viewer questions, and our viewers test them thoroughly! The discussion touches upon acid soil, lichen, planting processes, garlic mustard, blue bells, a special 75 year old maple tree and much more. Chuck Voigt shows a mission olive and explains the advantages of dried fruit.

>>> HI AND WELCOME TO—I ALMOST SAID ILLINOIS GARDENER.
WELCOME TO MID-AMERICAN GARDENER.
WE ARE GLAD THAT YOU HAVE JOINED US.
WE ARE HERE TO ANSWER QUESTIONS THAT ARE VERY IMPORTANT RIGHT NOW IN OUR REGION WHICH IS MID-AMERICA.
HI.
I AM DIANNE NOLAND.
I TEACH HORTICULTURE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS IN THE CROP SCIENCES DEPARTMENT, AND THAT’S IN THE COLLEGE OF ACES HERE ON THE URBANA CAMPUS.
NOW, THERE ARE THREE HIGHLY INTELLIGENT PEOPLE RIGHT HERE NEXT TO ME.
LET’S FIND OUT—THEY ARE LOOKING AROUND!
LET’S FIND OUT WHO THEY ARE AND THEIR EXPERTISE AND YOU CAN REALLY GAUGE THEIR QUESTIONS TOWARDS THEIR EXPERTISE.
LET’S START FIRST WITH CHUCK VOIGT.
HI, CHUCK.
>>HI, DIANNE. I AM CHUCK VOIGT ALSO IN THE CROP SCIENCES DEPARTMENT, HORTICULTURE.
MY AREA OF SPECIALIZATION WOULD BE VEGETABLES AND HERBS.
ALTHOUGH I CAN DO OTHER THINGS AS WELL, BUT HOPEFULLY WE HAVE GOT THINGS COVERED.
TONIGHT I BROUGHT A LITTLE SPECIAL HERE.
IT IS AN OLIVE TREE.
I HAD LINDA FRANZEN UP FROM THE NEW ORLEANS AREA, AND SHE BROUGHT A FEW OLIVE PLANTS UP TO THE PROGRAM.
>> WHICH WAS HERB DAY.
>>IT WAS HERB DAY.
SO IT WAS IN JANUARY, BUT FORTUNATELY I HAVE GREENHOUSE SPACE.
I TOOK IT IN THERE.
IT WAS OUT IN MY PLANT AREA DURING THE SUMMER.
IT WAS OUTSIDE LAST SUMMER.
WHEN I REPOTTED IT, I STOOD IT UP STRAIGHT, BUT IT HAS THIS ONE BRANCH THAT REALLY WANTS TO GO AND BE WEEPY.
NEXT TIME I POT IT, I WILL TRY TO BE HARDHEARTED AND STRAIGHTEN IT AND CUT IT BACK AND MAYBE TRY TO ROOT A CUTTING.
EVEN LAST YEAR, IT HAD A FEW FLOWERS ON IT, THEY DIDN’T AMOUNT TO ANYTHING.
BUT TAKING THIS IN AND OUT FOR A FEW YEARS, MAYBE I WILL TAKE A FRESH OLIVE ONE DAY.
>>THAT WOULD BE GREAT!
>>THAT WOULD BE GREAT.
THE WEEPING HABIT IS QUITE INTERESTING.
>>IT IS.
IT IS.
>> SEE IF IT STAYS THAT WAY.
>>WHEN WE SEE THE 2,000 YEARS OLD OLIVE TREES IN THE OLD COUNTRY, THEY HAVE THE BIG GNARLY TRUNKS.
I WAS AMAZED THIS ONE WAS GETTING GNARLY AND KNOBBY DOWN AT THE BASE ALREADY.
>>AS A YOUNGSTER.
>>YEAH.
I WILL SHOW THAT TO PHIL NIXON.
IT MIGHT MAKE A BONSAI SUBJECT.
>>THAT’S WHAT IT IS ALREADY!
>>OKAY.
THANK YOU, CHUCK THAT WAS VERY, VERY INTERESTING.
WE WILL GO NEXT TO YOU, JENNIFER FISHBURN.
>>HI.
I AM A HORTICULTURE EDUCATOR WITH THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS EXTENSION IN SANGAMON, MENARD AND LOGAN COUNTIES.
I LIKE TO TALK ABOUT THE SAME THINGS CHUCK DOES, VEGETABLES AND HERBS AND I WILL ALSO TALK ABOUT FLOWERS AND ORNAMENTALS AND FRUITS.
MY SHOW AND TELL, I BROUGHT VIRGINIA BLUE BELLS FROM MY YARD.
THEY ARE NATURALIZED AMONG MY HOSTAS.
BY THE TIME THE HOSTAS COME UP AND GET FULL, THE BLUE BELLS ARE STARTING TO DIE BACK.
I HIGHLY SUGGEST THESE TO ADD SPRING COLOR TO YOUR YARD BY TAKING ADVANTAGE OF NATIVE PLANT FILLS IN YOUR AREA.
>>I WANT YOU TO KNOW I AM MAKING A NOTE ABOUT THAT PLANT COMBINATION.
I REALLY LIKE THAT, HOSTAS AND BLUE BELLS.
WHEW!
VERY NICE. YOU LEARN SO MUCH.
THAT’S SUCH A NICE PLANT.
YOU I LOVE IT HAS PINKS PURPOSES, AND PLUS, VERY PRETTY.
THANK YOU, JENNIFER.
WE WILL GO TO THE GUY RIGHT NEXT TO ME, AND THIS IS DR. DON WHITE.
>>YES, I AM DON WHITE.
I AM AN EMERITUS PROFESSOR OF PLANT PATHOLOGY.
I TAUGHT INTRODUCTORY PATHOLOGY, DISEASES OF CROPS, AND DISEASES OF ORNAMENTAL AND TURF GRASSES.
I RECENTLY HAVE BECOME A MASTER GARDENER.
>>YEAH!
>>MOST TAUGHT BY PEOPLE I HAD IN CLASS!
(LAUGHING)
>>NOT ME.
>>NOT YOU.
YOU ARE THE ONLY ONE!
MY SHOW AND TELL, DIANNE GAVE ME AN “F” FOR THIS FLOWER ARRANGEMENT.
>>THE DESIGN IS OKAY, IT IS JUST THE PLANT MATERIAL.
THIS IS GARLIC MUSTARD, AND THIS IS THE SCOURGE OF THE WOODS.
THIS PLANT WAS BROUGHT INTO THE U.S. FROM EUROPE AS A FOOD FLAVORING PLANT.
IF YOU TAKE IT AND SMUSH IT UP, IT DOES ACTUALLY HAVE A GARLICKY SMELL TO IT.
THE PROBLEM IS IT JUST TAKES OVER.
IT GETS VERY SMALL SEEDED.
THE SEEDS WILL LAST FOREVER.
IT IS HARD TO GET RID OF.
WHAT YOU GOT TO DO IS IF EVERYBODY WHO IS WATCHING WOULD GO OUT AND PULL ABOUT 15 POUNDS OF THIS STUFF, PUT IT IN A PLASTIC BAG AND FEED IT TO THE TRASH MAN.
NOW I DON’T USUALLY THINK IN TERMS OF FEEDING IT TO THE TRASH MAN, BUT IF YOU LAY IT DOWN IN THE WOODS, EVEN WITH THIS LITTLE BIT OF FLOWER ON THERE, IT WILL GO AHEAD AND PRODUCE SEEDS AND LOTS OF SEEDS!
SO THIS IS A PLANT THAT IS REALLY HARD TO CONTAIN.
WE COULD USE EVERYBODY’S HELP.
>>I LITERALLY WALK IN THE WOODS WITH A PLASTIC BAG.
MY GOAL IS TO FILL A BAG A DAY, BUT WORK AND LIFE HAPPENS.
BUT YOU CANNOT KEEP AHEAD OF IT.
>>I PULL IT, AND I JUST BARELY HEAR THE LITTLE SCREAMS.
>>I HAVE SEEN RECIPES FOR PESTO MADE WITH IT.
YOU ARE PULLING IT AND BAGGING IT YOU COULD EAT SOME OF IT JUST FOR REVENGE.
>>85 MILLION PEOPLE WOULD MAKE PESTO, WE WILL STILL HAVE SOME.
BUT IT WILL BE A LITTLE BIT BETTER.
THANK YOU FOR BRINGING THAT BEAUTIFUL FLORAL DESIGN.  MY FLORAL DESIGN LECTURE AFTER HIS PLANT PATHOLOGY.
I GOT TO FOLLOW HIM IN THE LECTURE ROOM.
VERY INTERESTING AS ALWAYS.
WE NOW HAVE A SPECIAL “DID YOU KNOW” WE ARE GOING TO GO TO.
ALWAYS GREAT TO HAVE THE CLIMBING PLANTS GOING WITH SOME OF THE OTHERS.
>>SUNFLOWERS ARE SO VORACIOUS FEEDERS. I QUESTION HOW THE CUCUMBER WILL DO AT THE BASE OF THE FLOWER.
THEY SUCK WATER AND NUTRIENTS AND EVERYTHING, AND KEEP WEEDS AT BAY, ONCE THEY ARE BIG AND ESTABLISHED.
>>I HAD TOMATOES USE THEM AS SUPPORTS INADVERTENTLY.
I DIDN’T PLAN FOR IT, BUT THE SUN FLOWERS WERE A GOOD SUPPORT FOR TOMATOES.
IF THEY COME TOGETHER AT A DIFFERENT POINT, NOT RIGHT AT THE BASE MAYBE, WHO KNOWS.
BUT ANYWAY, WE WANT TO GO TO THE PHONE LINES NEXT AND LET’S TALK TO TAMMY.
SHE HAS A QUESTION ABOUT SHRUBS ON LINE ONE.  HI, TAMMY.
>>CALLER: THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR TAKING MY CALL.
MY QUESTION TONIGHT IS SHRUB RELATED.
I KNOW THAT THE NAME OF THIS SHRUB I WILL BOTCH IT TERRIBLY AND NOBODY WILL KNOW WHAT I AM TALKING ABOUT.
I THINK IT IS CALLED SOMETHING CLOSE TO WEIGELA.
>>I SAY WEIGELA.
>>I WILL AGREE WITH YOU, THAT WAY WE ARE TIED!
>>THANK YOU, DR. DON.
WHAT IS YOUR QUESTION ABOUT IT?
>>I BOUGHT ONE IN A POT 15 YEARS AGO WHEN I MOVED INTO MY CONDO AND PUT IT OFF THE BACK PATIO.
IT LOVES THAT SPACE.
THE SUN IS PERFECT FOR IT.
AND IT WOULD FLOWER OVER AND THE BRANCHES WOULD WEEP.
IT WAS JUST BEAUTIFUL, AND FOUR AND SIX FEET IN DIAMETER AND BLOOMING BLOOM, BLOOM ALL THE TIME.
AFTER FIVE YEARS OR SO, IT GOT TO THE POINT WHERE IT WASN’T CASCADING ANY MORE, JUST GOING STRAIGHT UP.
FINALLY NOW INTO ITS 15TH YEAR.
IT DIDN’T BLOOM OVER AT ALL, AND IT WAS EIGHT FEET HIGH.
I DON’T STAND ON MY DECK TO TRIM THE VERY TOPS OF IT WHEN I WOULD HAVE TO TRIM IT BACK BECAUSE IT GROWS AND GROWS AND GROWS LIKE CRAZY.
LAST FALL, I TOOK IT THREE FEET TO THE BRANCH.
THAT’S ALL THAT IS STICKING UP OUT OF THE GROUND.
BEAUTIFUL PLANT FOR 15 YEARS.
BUT I AM NOT SEEING ANY GROWTH YET THIS SPRING.
AM I NOT BEING PATIENT ENOUGH?
>> PATIENCE IS A VIRTUE THIS YEAR.
EVERYTHING IS REALLY LATE.
I KNOW MY ROSE BUSHES HAVE JUST STARTED TO PEEK OUT.
I THINK THERE IS STILL A POSSIBILITY OF TIME.
WHAT YOU MIGHT WANT TO TRY IN THE FUTURE IS SELECTIVELY PRUNING, MAYBE DO A THIRD OF THE OLD STEMS EACH YEAR, AND THAT WILL GIVE YOU MORE DESIRABLE LOOK.
KEEP IN MIND, THEY ARE A RATHER LARGE PLANT.
IT MAY NOT BE THE OPTIMAL PLANT FOR THAT SPOT.
IT MAY NOT BLOOM THIS YEAR IF YOU HAVE TRIMMED IT LAST YEAR, DEPENDING WHEN YOU TRIMMED IT.
>>TREAT IT LIKE A LILAC WHERE YOU TAKE A THIRD OUT OF THE OLDER GROWTH AND DO THAT FOR THREE YEARS.
MAYBE WE LOST HER.
THAT WILL HELP YOU WITH THE WEIGELA.
>>WEIGELA.
>> DIFFERENT PRONUNCIATIONS.
LINE FOUR, KATHY HAS A QUESTION ABOUT TULIPS.
HI, KATHY?
>>CALLER: HI, I HAVE A FRIEND WHO IS A MASTER GARDENER IN MEMPHIS.
SHE ENDED UP—THEIR TULIPS ARE AN ANNUAL.
THEY PULL THEM UP AND THROW THEM AWAY.
SHE GAVE THEM TO ME, AND THEY HAVE THE STEMS STILL ON THEM.
I WAS WONDERING IF I SHOULD PLANT THEM NOW OR DRY THEM AND KEEP THEM FOR THE FALL.
>>THE LEAVES ARE GREEN, ATTACHED TO THE STEM, ATTACHED TO THE BULB, CORRECT?
>>CALLER: THERE ARE NO LEAVES ON IT.
JUST BASICALLY THE STEM.
>>BUT THERE ARE ROOTS?
>>CALLER: YES.
RIGHT.
>>WHERE DO THE LEAVES GO?
>>CALLER: I DON’T KNOW!
(LAUGHING) I DON’T KNOW IF SHE PULLED THEM OFF.
THEY DUG THEM UP.
I AM GOING OUT AND LOOK.
>>LEAVES ARE THE MOST IMPORTANT PART.
>>CALLER: THEY DO HAVE LEAVES.
>>GOOD.
YOU WILL DO SOMETHING CALLED HEALING IN, UNLESS YOU CAN GET THEM PLANTED RIGHT AWAY.
YOU PUT THEM IN A SOIL TRENCH, AND YOU LET THAT—IT IS NOT GOING TO LOOK GREAT.
MAYBE DO IT IN NURSERY AREA OR A PLACE LITTLE BIT OUT BACK AND LET THE LEAVES NATURALLY RIPEN AND GO YELLOW, AND YOU CAN TRIM THOSE OFF, AND YOU CAN DIG THE TULIP BULB AND MOVE TO PERMANENT SPORT.
IT IS CALLED HEALING IN.
ARBORETUMS DO IT ALL THE TIME.
THEY PUT THEM OUT BACK.
YOU CAN GET THEM TO FLOWER ON, IT IS NOT AS LONG-LIVED AS DAFFODILS WOULD BE.
ANYONE WANT TO ADD ANYTHING ELSE?
>> IF YOU DON’T HEAL THEM, YOU WERE TO JUST LEAVE THEM BE, THEY ARE NOT GOING TO BE ABLE TO PHOTOSYNTHESIZE TO MAKE ENOUGH ENERGY FOR THE BULBS TO COME BACK FOR THE FOLLOWING YEAR.
THAT’S REALLY CRITICAL, AND ALL THE VIEWERS AS YOUR DAFFODILS, HYACINTH, TULIPS, LEAVE THE YELLOW FOLIAGE FOR THE PLANT TO BE BEAUTIFUL NEXT YEAR.
>>IF YOU HAVE THEM IN THE FRONT OF YOUR GARDEN NEXT TIME YOU PLANT SOMETHING, DON’T DO THAT.
PLANT IT IN THE MID-BORDER OR THE BACKGROUND BECAUSE THAT’S ALL THAT SHOWS UP AT THIS TIME OF THE YEAR.
MAKE SURE YOU COVER IT WITH COMPANION PERENNIALS THAT WILL HIDE THAT UGLY RIPENING LIGHTER GREEN FOLIAGE.
LET IT GET ALMOST YELLOW GREEN AND THEN YOU CAN TAKE IT OUT.
THANK YOU FOR THE TULIP QUESTION.
THAT’S ONE OF MY FAVORITE ONES TO TALK ABOUT IN CLASS.
NOW, WE WILL GO NEXT TO LINE TWO QUESTION ON CHESTNUTS WITH TOM.
HI THERE, TOM, LINE TWO.
>>CALLER: YES, I AM HERE.
>> HI THERE.
WHAT IS YOUR QUESTION?
>>CALLER: MY QUESTION IS I HAVE AN AMERICAN CHESTNUT TREE THAT I WANT TO GIVE TO A FRIEND, AND HE HAS A GUY LINED UP TO WITH A SPADE TO DO THE JOB, BUT IT IS BEGINNING TO BUD OUT.
IS THIS A GOOD TIME TO MOVE IT?
>>WELL I WOULD THINK IDEALLY YOU WILL WAIT ON MOST—I DON’T KNOW SPECIFIC TO THE CHESTNUT, BUT MOST OF THE TREES THEY WILL TOO DIG THOSE IN THE FALL.
IT MAYBE BEST TO WAIT UNTIL THEN.
IT DEPENDS ON THE SIZE, THOUGH.
IF WE ARE TALKING HALF INCH, TWO INCH CALIBER.
>>CALLER: PROBABLY TEN FEET TALL.
>>HOW BIG AROUND WOULD YOU SAY?
>>CALLER: WELL, IT IS.
>>LIKE DIAMETER.
>>CALLER: POSSIBLY SIX FEET AROUND.
>>THE TRUNK THE MAIN TRUNK, TWO INCHES ACROSS?
>>CALLER: NO.
IT IS NOT THAT BIG.
>> THE YOU MIGHT GET ENOUGH LEAVES IF YOU MOVE QUICK.
YEAH, THE SOONER THE BETTER.
>>DON’T PLANT IT TOO DEEP.
PLANT IT ON A LITTLE BIT OF THE HIGH SIDE, MULCH IT IN.
>>WITH A SPADE IF YOU DIG THE HOLE IT WILL DROP IT RIGHT IN.
>>WELL, I WOULD PUT A LITTLE SOIL IN THERE.
>>IF IT HASN’T BEEN IN NURSERY WITH SOIL DUMPED UP THERE IT WON’T BE AN ISSUE.
>>THAT’S WHAT KILLS TREES THE MOST IS PLANTING THEM TOO DEEP.
>>MAKE SURE YOU WATER THROUGHOUT THE SUMMER.
I KNOW THAT MAY SOUND LIKE EVERYBODY SHOULD KNOW THAT, BUT WE ARE GETTING A LOT OF CALLS THIS YEAR ON PEOPLE THAT FORGOT TO WATER LAST YEAR, AND NOW THINGS AREN’T COMING BACK.
WATER WILL BE REALLY CRITICAL THIS SUMMER.
IT IS REALLY AN AMERICAN CHESTNUT.
>>CALLER: THANK YOU VERY MUCH.
>>THAT’S WHAT HE SAID EARLY, AMERICAN CHESTNUT.
I HOPE SO ANYWAY.
LET’S GO BACK AROUND TO A SHOW AND TELL WHEN YOU, CHUCK.
>>OKAY, TONIGHT WAS SMALL FRUIT NIGHT IN MY CLASS, AND FOR THAT ONE I LIKE TO BRING IN DRIED FRUITS OF DIFFERENT TYPES.
WE BROUGHT IN DRIED BLUEBERRIES WHICH THEY ARE KIND OF SMALL.
SO I SUSPECT THESE ARE PROBABLY THE LOW BUSH MAINE BLUEBERRIES.
THOSE ARE PRETTY NEAT.
THIS IS INTERESTING.
THE ZANTE CURRANTS ARE REALLY LITTLE RAISINS.
>>TIP THAT FORWARD.
>>YES, I WILL.
THERE THEY ARE.
THEY ARE LITTLE RAISINS.  THEY ARE NOT DRIED CURRANT.
LITTLE TINY GRAPES ON LITTLE BUNCHES, THEY ARE CORINTHIAN GRAPES.
SOMEHOW CORINTHIAN BECAME CURRANT.
WHEN YOU GET CURRANT IN YOUR SCONE, CHANCES ARE THEY ARE BABY RAISINS AND NOT REALLY CURRANTS.
DRIED CRANBERRIES IS, CRAISINS WAS INVENTED AT UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS BY THE FOOD SCIENCE DEPARTMENT.
THE ORIGINAL FORMULATION THEY HAD MORE SUGAR THAN CRANBERRY, AND BECAUSE—
>>TIP THAT FORWARD A LITTLE BIT.
>>AND BECAUSE PEOPLE DON’T LIKE TO SEE SUGAR AS THE FIRST INGREDIENT, THEY CHANGED THE FORMULATION SO THERE IS SLIGHTLY LESS SUGAR.
IF YOU EVER CHEWED INTO A RAW CRANBERRY, THEY ARE PRETTY SOUR AND IT TAKES QUITE A BIT TO DO AWAY WITH THAT.
GOLDEN RAISINS WHICH ARE MY FAVORITE RAISIN.
I AM NOT A BIG FAN OF THE BROWN ONES, BUT THESE ARE THE SAME TYPE OF GRAPE, BUT THEY HAVE BEEN CURED, BEEN DRIED WITH BURNING SULFUR.
SO THEY MAINTAIN THEIR GOLDEN COLOR AND PICK UP A LITTLE SULFUR.
TO ME THEY TASTE MORE LIKE GRAPES THAN THE REGULAR RAISINS.
REGULAR RAISINS ARE PUT OUT ENTREES IN FRESNO, CALIFORNIA, THEY ARE SUN DIED, AND SUGAR CARMELIZES, AND THAT’S WHY THEY GET THE BROWN COLOR.
INTERESTING DRIED SMALL FRUITS YOU MIGHT—WHEN YOU GO INTO A BIG GROCERY STORE, YOU MIGHT FIND THOSE, AND MANY OTHERS AS WELL, DRIED CHERRIES HAVE REALLY, REALLY HELPED THE CHERRY INDUSTRY IN MICHIGAN FOR INSTANCE. 
>>THEY KEEP SO WELL, AND YOU CAN USE THEM FOR LOTS OF DIFFERENT THINGS.
VERY GOOD.
THANK YOU, CHUCK.
GOOD VARIETY.
JENNIFER?
>> I HAVE A VIEWER QUESTION, AND IT IS THEY PLANTED BLUEBERRIES AND WANT TO KNOW WITH A FERTILIZER THEY SHOULD USE.
FOR THE VIEWERS OUT THERE, AS FAR AS BLUEBERRIES GO, THE BIGGEST—MOST HELPFUL THING YOU CAN DO FOR BLUEBERRIES IS MAKE SURE THE SOIL IS CORRECT BEFORE YOU PLANT THEM.
IT MAY TAKE A COUPLE YEARS OF AMENDING YOUR SOIL OR PUTTING IN RAISED BED BEFORE YOU PUT IN THE BLUEBERRY PLANTS.
THEY NEED SOIL PH AROUND FIVE, ESPECIALLY IN CENTRAL ILLINOIS.
>>MID-AMERICA.
WE REALLY DON’T HAVE THAT.
SOME OF THE VIEWERS OUT THERE MAYBE FORTUNATE TO HAVE THOSE CONDITIONS.
IF NOT, THEY WILL NEED TO AMEND WITH SPHAGNUM PEAT AND OTHER AMENDMENTS.
FOR THE FIRST YEAR, WHEN YOU PLANT THOSE, YOU WAIT ABOUT A MONTH, AND THEN FERTILIZE THAT AREA IN 12-INCH BAND KEEPING AWAY FROM THE STEM.
EACH ADDITIONAL YEAR I INCREASE THE FERTILIZER AND INCREASE THE WIDTH PUTTING THAT FERTILIZER IN.
>>MOST PEOPLE DON’T SPEND ENOUGH TIME PREPPING THE SOIL.
WE TEND TO THINK IT IS OKAY TO PLANT 7 PH AND BRING IT DOWN.
IT IS REALLY NOT.
YOU HAVE TO DO THAT PREPARATION WORK AHEAD OF TIME.
WE ARE ALL SHAKING OUR HEADS.
NOT A GOOD IDEA.
>>IF YOU DON’T HAVE IT, AND YOU GOT IN EXPENSIVE BLUEBERRY BUSH, PLANT IT ANYWAY AND ENJOY THE FEW FRUITS YOU GET.
>>INSTEAD OF HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS.
>>RIGHT.
>>THANK YOU, JENNIFER.
NOW, DON.
>>YES, THE QUESTION I HAVE IS THE VIEWER SAYS THAT I HAVE A 75 YEAR OLD MAPLE TREE THAT IS BARK ON ONE SIDE, LOWER BASE OF THE TREE, TURNING ASH WHITE COLOR.
SHE HADN’T NOTICED ANY BUGS.
COULD YOU TELL ME WHAT IS CAUSING DISCOLORATION, ALSO SPRAYING, DISCOLORED BARK WITH TREE PAINT HELP OR HARM.
LEAVE IT ALONE.
JUST ENJOY THE WHITE.
THIS MIGHT JUST REALLY FIT WITH A PHONE QUESTION WE HAVE GOT COMING UP GOING TO BE ON LINE FIVE.
I SUSPECT WHAT YOU ARE LOOKING AT THERE IS LIKEN GROWTH.
I HAVE GOT SOME IN THE WOODS THAT TOOK LIKE SOMEBODY TOOK WHITEWASH AND PAINTED BLOTCHES ON THE STEMS.
LIKENS.
SOMETIMES YOU WILL SEE TREES WITH BIG STREAKS ON IT, IT IS LIKENS.
A LOT OF TIMES WHAT WILL HAPPEN, IF YOU HAVE A DEAD BRANCH, THE SAP IN THE TREE WILL OOZE OUT ONTO THE SURFACE AND RUN DOWN THE TREE.
YOU GET A LITTLE BIT LIKEN GROWTH THERE THAN ON THE REMAINDER OF THE TREE.
IT IS NOT HARMFUL.
I WOULDN’T WORRY ABOUT IT, AND WE WILL SEE WHAT CALLER ON LINE FIVE HAS TO ADD TO THAT.
>>WHY DON’T WE GO TO LINE FIVE, AND IT IS ABOUT LIKENS ON TREE.
JUDY, LINE FIVE.
>>CALLER: IT IS KATIE.
>>WELL, KATIE,‘S LE TALK TO YOU, KATIE!
>>CALLER: ALL RIGHT.
I WAS NOTICING IN MY YARD THE OTHER DAY, ALMOST ALL OF MY TREES, AND WE ARE TALKING LILAC BUSH, CHERRY TREES, DOGWOOD, APPLE, THEY ALL HAVE THIS BLOTCHING, SPLOTCHY LIKEN ON IT.
IT IS KIND OF A GREENISH GRAY I WOULD SAY.
I WAS WONDERING IS THIS BAD OR IS THERE ANYTHING I SHOULD DO ABOUT THIS OR JUST LEAVE IT BE?
>> I DON’T THINK THERE IS ANYTHING YOU CAN DO WITH IT, AND I THINK JUST JOIN THE CROWD.
THERE IS A LOT OF IT AROUND THIS YEAR.
>> IT IS REALLY A SIGN OF CLEAN AIR BECAUSE BACK WHEN THERE IS A LOT OF INDUSTRIAL POLLUTANTS IN THE AIR, WE COULDN’T GROW LIKENS.
IT IS ACTUALLY A SIGN OF A HEALTHY ENVIRONMENT THAT IS GETTING BETTER.
KIND OF—THAT’S WHAT WOULD GROW ON A TREE NATURALLY OUT IN THE PRISTINE FOREST.
SO KIND OF JUST CELEBRATE WE ARE CLOSER BACK TO THAT A LITTLE BIT.
>>THAT’S REALLY A GREAT THING!
IT IS SIGN OF CLEAN AIR.
SO JUST ENJOY IT.
THERE ARE SO MANY NATURAL THINGS OUT IN THE WOODS.
IF YOU HAVE THAT IN YOUR GARDEN, THAT MEANS YOU HAVE A VERY GOOD GROWING ENVIRONMENT.
OKAY.
SO THANK YOU, KATIE, FOR THAT.
LET’S GO TO OUR LITTLE MAG QUIZ NEXT, AND IT IS ABOUT A TREE.
EVERY STATE HAS AN OAK.
I THINK REDWOOD CAME IN SECOND, AND THAT WOULDN’T HAVE DONE VERY WELL IN MID-AMERICA.
I THINK PINE CAME IN THERE PRETTY CLOSE.
WE ARE GRAD THAT IT IS A PLACE SOMETHING THAT GROWS IN ALL THE PLACES IN UNITED STATES.
LET’S GO TO A KNOCKOUT ROSE QUESTION ON LINE THREE.
>>CALLER: HI.
THANKS FOR TAKING MY CALL.
>>YOU ARE WELCOME.
>>CALLER: I HAVE, THEY ARE PROBABLY FOUR YEARS OLD, KNOCKOUT ROSES AT MY HOUSE, AND ALSO AT CHURCH.
LITTLE MAROON SPROUTS COMING FROM THE BOTTOM, NOTHING ON THE TOP.
JUST WONDERING IF WE SHOULD JUST KEEP WAITING UNTIL THEY SPROUT UP OR DO I NEED TO CUT BACK?
>> I WOULD SAY TO GIVE IT A COUPLE MORE DAYS AND WAIT TO SEE WHAT THE WARM WEEKEND DOES.
BUT I REALLY WOULD BELIEVE THAT THIS YEAR WE WILLING CUTTING OUR KNOCKOUTS ALMOST BACK TO THE GROUND.
IT WON’T HURT THEM.
THEY WILL COME BACK BEAUTIFUL AND REJUVENATED.
WE HAD A REALLY HARD WINTER IT THAT TOOK ROSES FOR A LOOP.
THEY DIDN’T DO SO WELL THIS YEAR.
WE HAD REAL EASY WINTERS TWO YEARS IN A ROW WHEN THEY SPROUTED OUT AND GOT EXTREMELY TALL.
THIS IS PROBABLY MORE WHAT WE COULD EXPECT TO SEE.
JUST WAIT A MINUTE AND THEN CUT THEM BACK.
THANK YOU FOR THAT.
NOW EVERYONE WHO HAS KNOCKOUT ROSE QUESTIONS, YOU CAN JUST LISTEN TO THE REST OF THE SHOW BECAUSE IT IS ALL THE SAME.
LET’S GO TO LINE SIX ABOUT LILACS WITH LINDA.  HI THERE, LINE SIX.
>>CALLER: HI.
I HAVE A QUESTION I HAVE A YELLOW LILAC TEN, MAYBE 12, BUT MORE LIKELY TEN YEARS OLD, BEAUTIFUL.
IT HAS NEVER BLOOMED.
CAN YOU TELL ME WHY OR WHAT I CAN DO TO GET IT TO BLOOM?
>>IS IT IN FULL SUN?
>>CALLER: NO.
IT IS ON THE NORTH SIDE OF MY HOUSE.
>>OHHHH!
>>THE SECOND QUESTION I ALWAYS ASK WHEN LILACS DON’T BLOOM, DO YOU PRUNE IT, AND IF SO, WHEN?
>>CALLER: NO.
>>SO I THINK THE EXPOSURE IS PROBABLY THE BIGGEST PROBLEM.
LIKE THE BULBS WE TALKED ABOUT, LILACS NEED TO GET A LOT OF SOLAR ENERGY TO BUILD-UP THE FLOWER BUDS FOR THE NEXT YEAR.
YOU KEEP THEM IN PERPETUAL SHADY LOCATION LIKE THE NORTH SIDE OF A BUILDING, THAT CAN BE A PROBLEM.
>> NOW, I WONDER ON THE YELLOW, ARE THERE AREAS BELOW WHERE SHE COULD TAKE SOME OF THE—
>>IF SHE IS GETTING ROOT SUCKERS, IF IT IS NOT GRAFTED.
>>THAT’S WHAT I WAS WONDERING. IF YOU CAN DO THAT, YOU DON’T HAVE TO MOVE THE WHOLE SHRUB.
YOU CAN JUST MOVE A PART OF IT, BUT I DON’T HAVE A YELLOW LILAC.
SO I AM NOT SURE EXACTLY HOW THAT WORKS.  BUT I WOULD GET IT OUT OF THERE AT LEAST PARTS OF IT, IF YOU CAN.
BECAUSE IT NEEDS SUN.
THEN IF YOU HAVE GOT A TEN YEAR OLD TREE, AND IT HAS GROWN, THEN YOU WILL MAYBE ONCE YOU GET IT ESTABLISHED, THEN THAT’S WHAT—THAT’S WHEN YOU START TO REJUVENATE IT.
OLDER WOOD, TAKE A THIRD OUT, SECOND YEAR, SECOND OLDEST THIRD, AND YOU KNOW THE REST FOR THE THIRD YEAR I WOULD SAY.
WE DON’T HAVE MUCH TIME, BUT WE WILL GO QUICKLY TO A HONEYSUCKLE QUESTION WITH SHARON ON LINE ONE.
DO YOU HAVE A QUICK QUESTION?
>>CALLER: YES.
THE HONEYSUCKLE IS SIX YEARS OLD.
WE NOTICED 98% IS DEAD.
I DIDN’T KNOW IF IT WAS FROM THE HARD WINTER OR WHAT, BUT WE USE IT FOR PRIVACY AND KIND OF A WINDBREAK, TOO.
I JUST WONDERED IF WE NEED TO CUT THE DEAD OFF OR JUST HOPE FOR THE BEST?
>> I HAVE SEEN A LOT OF DEAD THIS YEAR.
IT WAS JUST A HARD WINTER.
THERE IS A LOT OF PLANT MATERIAL THAT JUST ISN’T GOING TO PROBABLY MAKE IT BACK THIS YEAR.
YOU COULD WAIT A LITTLE BIT.
BUT ODDS ARE IT WILL PROBABLY SUCKER UP FROM THE BOTTOM AND GET NEW SPROUTS.
IT MAY HAVE TO HAVE THE TOP REMOVED.
>> MAY TAKE A YEAR OR TWO TO GET BACK UP AS A SCREEN.
HONEYSUCKLES GENERALLY SPEAKING PRETTY HARD TO KILL.
>>MAY WANT TO THINK OF SUNFLOWERS.
NOT GREAT FOR PRIVACY.
>>OR BROOM CORN.
>>OR BROOM CORN OR SOME KIND OF ANNUAL, FOUNTAIN GRASS.
SOMETHING YOU CAN USE TO FILL IN, IN THE MEANTIME, IF YOU HAVE GOT THE SPACE WHICH SOUNDS LIKE YOU MIGHT HAVE THE SPACE.  SO ANYWAY.
THAT’S KIND OF A SAD STORY FOR PRIVACY.
BUT IT WON’T LAST FOREVER.
HONEYSUCKLES WILL REGROW.
WOW, THE SHOW GOES FAST.
I WANT TO THANK YOU THREE FOR ALL OF YOUR EXPERTISE AND FOR EACH PERSON WHO CALLED IN.
WE THANK OUR VIEWERS.
WE COULDN’T DO IT WITHOUT YOU.  WE HOPE YOU GET OUT THERE, RAIN OR SHINE, COLD OR HOT AND HAVE A GREAT WEEK GARDENING.
BYE-BYE.

Air Dates and Times

Channel Day Time
WILL-TV, Urbana Thursdays 7 pm (live)
  Saturdays 11 am (repeat)
WTVP-TV, Peoria Saturdays 10:30 am
WEIU-TV, Charleston Sundays 4:30 pm
WILL-AM/90.9 HD2 & HD3, Urbana Saturdays 6:30 am
WSEC-TV, Springfield Saturdays 11 am
WQEC-TV, Quincy Saturdays 11 am
WMEC-TV, Macomb Saturdays 11 am
WYCC-TV, Chicago Wednesdays 1 pm

Mid-American Gardener is supported by:

Country Arbors logo
Landscape Recycling Center logo