Mid-American Gardener: hollyhocks, lavender, growing grass, maple trees and tomatoes

April 24, 2014

Horticulture Specialist Dianne Noland and special guest gardening panelists Tom Voigt and Sandy Mason discuss hollyhocks, lavender and their amazing smells, growing grass, pre-planting plans for tomatoes, maple trees and so much more. Tom Voigt shows some handy dandy tools that can assist you in your gardening efforts.

HI.
I AM DIANNE NOLAND.
I TEACH HORTICULTURE IN THE CROP SCIENCES DEPARTMENT IN THE COLLEGE OF ACES.
I HAVE SOME REALLY TALENTED PEOPLE WITH ME.
LET’S FIND OUT WHO IS HERE, AND WHAT THEIR EXPERTISE IS.
I AM GOING TO START FIRST WITH YOU, SANDY MASON.
HI.
>>HI.
I AM SANDY MASON, HORTICULTURE EDUCATOR WITH UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS EXTENSION.
I AM THE EDUCATOR FOR CHAMPAIGN, FORD, IROQUOIS COUNTIES IS MY AREA.
I TAKE CARE OF ALL KINDS OF QUESTIONS, ANYTHING GREEN AND GROWING, ORNAMENTALS, TREES.
WE WILL LEAVE LAWMAKERS TO HIM.
THAT GUY!
(LAUGHING) I ACTUALLY HAVE A VIEWER QUESTION ABOUT HOLLYHOCKS WHICH I KNOW IS REALLY POPULAR FLOWER.
BUT WE HAVE HAD LOT OF PROBLEMS WITH HOLLYHOCK RUST.
IT ACTUALLY CAUSES THESE, PUSTULES, SOUNDS GROSS, BUT BUMPS ON UNDER SIDES OF THE LEAVES WHERE YOU REALLY SEE IT, AND CAN ALSO SHOW UP ON THE TOPSIDES OF THE LEAVES.
IT CAN GET TO THE POINT WHERE IT WILL DEFOLIATE AND JUST THE PLANTS GET STUNTED AND THEY DON’T DO VERY WELL.
IT CAN BE A SERIOUS DISEASE.
THIS IS A FUNGAL DISEASE.
AS WE KNOW, IT IS ONE OF THE DISEASES, AND ONE OF THE BIGGEST THINGS IS REALLY GOOD SANITATION, GETTING THE LEAVES OUT OF THERE IS A BIG THING.
THIS VIEWER WAS WORRIED ABOUT ANY NEW PLANTS THAT WOULD COME UP THIS SPRING AND ANY PLANTS SHE MIGHT HAVE WITH GOOD REASON TO HAVE CONCERN ABOUT THAT.
BECAUSE IT IS A FUNGAL DISEASE THAT CAN TRANSFER TO OTHER PLANTS, NEW PLANTS YOU PLANT OR HOLLYHOCK TYPE PLANTS CAN ACTUALLY GET THIS, FOR THE MOST PART.
MINIATURE ONES ARE—
WHAT CAN YOU DO?
ANYTHING FROM LAST YEAR, GET THEM OUT.
IT WOULD HAVE BEEN GOOD TO DO OVER THE WINTER TIME. IF IT PROGRESSES, CONTINUES THROUGHOUT SUMMER, TO GET THOSE LEAVES AS SOON AS THEY START TO APPEAR.
THOSE ARE THE PUSTULES.
THERE IS A FUNGICIDE, DACONIL, FORNIL.
YOU HAVE TO SPRAY SEVERAL TIMES.
READ THE LABELS AND INTERVALS, EVERY TEN DAYS.
IT IS REALLY HARD TO CONTROL WITH THE FUNGICIDE.  BUT YOU HAVE TO DO THE SANITATION FIRST, AND THEN FUNGICIDE.
>>IF THEY ISOLATE THEM, IT WOULD BE BETTER?
>> ACTUALLY WOULD BE.
THESE CAN TRANSFER TO OTHER PLANTS.
SOME OF THE SMALLER ONES SEEM RESIST TENT, WITH SMALLER FLOWERS.
THEY CAN ALL GET IT.
IT HAS BEEN BAD THE LAST COUPLE OF YEARS.
HOPEFULLY, MAYBE NOT THIS YEAR.
WE DON’T KNOW.
BUT, YEAH, O WELL.
>>GARDENERS ARE ALWAYS OPTIMISTIC.
>>AREN’T WE, THOUGH!
LAUGH.
>>THAT’S WHAT WE LIKE TO SAY.
THANK YOU, SANDY.
I WILL INTRODUCE THE PERSON NEXT TO ME, DR. TOM VOIGT.
>>GOOD EVENING.
I AM TOM VOIGT ALSO IN THE DEPARTMENT OF CROP SCIENCES AT THE U OF I.
I WORK WITH PERENNIAL GRASSES.
I WORK WITH TURF AND ORNAMENTAL GRASSES AND I ALSO WORK WITH BIO ENERGY GRASSES.
I HAVE SHOW AND TELL TONIGHT.
I BROUGHT TWO OF MY FAVORITE WEEDERS.
>> YOU ARE SAYING YOU HAVE WEEDS?
>> I DO HAVE WEEDS IN MY YARD.
>>AHHHH!
>>THIS ONE IS A WEEDER.
IT STILL HAS DIRT OR SOIL—
>>IT IS DIRT!
(LAUGHING).
>>IT WORKS VERY NICELY TO SCRAPE SMALL WEEDS BETWEEN ROUTINE BEDDING PLANTS OR OTHER TIGHTLY PLANTED PLANTS WHILE THEY ARE DEVELOPING.
YOU CAN ALSO USE IT TO SCRAPE LARGER AREAS.
SO IT IS NOT FOR DIGGING DEEPLY, BUT MOST WEEDS WHEN THEY ARE SEEDLINGS, YOU DON’T NEED TO DIG THEM OUT, YOU HAVE A SHARP EDGE ON THERE, AND YOU SCRAPE, THAT WILL CUT THOSE WEED SEEDLINGS OFF AT THE GROUND LEVEL, AND THAT’S WHAT YOU NEED TO DO.
THIS WORKS VERY NICELY FOR SEEDLINGS.
>>AS A HORTICULTURALIST—
>>SIT BACK, SANDY!
>>DEADLY!
>>AS A HORTICULTURALIST, ONE OF THE PLEASING SOUNDS THAT I CAN THINK OF IS THE SOUND OF A DANDELION TAPROOT SNAPPING FOUR INCHES UNDERGROUND!
(LAUGHING) THIS HORTICULTURAL WEEDING KNIFE WORKS NICELY FOR THAT.
IT CAN BE IN CERTIFIED AT THE BASE OF THE DANDELION PLANT AND POP OUT FROM THE TIP UP.  NOW, THIS ALSO WORKS NICELY AS A SMALL TROWEL, AND IT WORKS WELL TO BREAK UP, IF YOU ARE PLANTING A SMALL AREA AND YOU DON’T WANT TO GET THE SHOVEL OUT, THIS WORKS NICELY TO BREAK THAT SOIL UP IF YOU ARE PLANTING BEDDING PLANTS OR VEGETABLES.
BOTH I THINK WORK VERY NICELY AND BOTH WELL USED IN MY YARD.
>>THEY COULD GO TO FULL SERVICE GARDEN CENTER AND ASK ABOUT THEM?
>> I WOULD EXPECT GARDEN CENTERS OR GOOD HARDWARE STORE GARDEN DEPARTMENTS, BUT ALSO ONLINE.  I HAVE SEEN THIS ONE OR VARIANT, A VARIANT OF THIS ONLINE FROM SEVERAL DIFFERENT LOCATIONS, DULUTH TRADERS, A GARDENING KNIFE OF THIS TYPE.
I WAS TRYING TO KEEP LOTS OF E-MAILS AND PHONE CALLS.
>>THIS HAS A BELT SHEATHE.
WORKS VERY NICELY.
THEN YOU KNOW YOU ARE A PLANT GEEK.
>>YOU LOOK GOOD!
(LAUGHING).
>>WELL DONE.
WE DO LIKE OUR TOOLS, THAT’S FOR SURE!
THANK YOU, TOM.
WELL, I HAVE A QUESTION FROM HARLAN, WHO IS FAITHFUL VIEWER FROM WELLINGTON.
HE ASKED IF I BUY TWO AMERICAN PERSIMMON TREES, THEY ARE 18-24 INCHES HIGH.
HOW MANY YEARS BEFORE THEY WOULD BEAR FRUIT.
I HAVE DONE A POLL OVER THE LAST TWO OR THREE WEEKS OF SHOWS, AND AT A FOOT AND A HALF TO TWO FEET, WE THINK IT WILL PROBABLY TAKE ANYWHERE FROM 7 TO 8 TO 10 YEARS TO BEAR FRUIT.
NOW THAT IS IF HE SAID HOW DO I ALSO KNOW IF I WILL GET—HE IS GETTING TWO OF THEM.
HOW DO I KNOW IF I WILL GET ONE MALE AND ONE FEMALE?
>> YOU DON’T KNOW THAT FOR SURE, BUT IF THEY ARE SELLING CULTIVARS AND THOSE WOULD BE MALE AND FEMALE, THEN YOU WOULD BE ABLE TO TELL.
MAKE SURE THAT THE NURSERY, YOU ARE GETTING IT LETS YOU KNOW IT IS A CULTIVAR.
LET’S GO NEXT TO A SPECIAL “DID YOU KNOW.”
>>> IT IS IMPORTANT TO NOT PLANT TOMATOES THIS WEEK, WOULD YOU SAY?
>> BECAUSE IT LOOKS LIKE IT WILL GET INTO THE 40S NEXT WEEK OR SO.
I DON’T KNOW.
>>MOTHER’S DAY WITH PROTECTION MAYBE TWO MINUTES BEFORE MOTHER’S DAY, 15 MINUTES EARLY OR SO UNLESS YOU WANT TO SUPPORT THE TOMATO GROWING INDUSTRY.
YOU WILL HAVE SOME FROST.
I REMEMBER A FROST ON MAY 20.
>>IS THAT THE MIDDLE OF MAY SOMEWHERE AROUND OUR FROST FREE DATE HERE.
>>UP NORTH, IT WOULD BE LATER, AND DOWN SOUTH, YOU ARE PROBABLY OKAY TO PLANT IN MAY.
BUT THIS APRIL, APRIL TO EARLY MAY IS REALLY NOT A GOOD IDEA FOR TOMATOES.
I HAD TO GET THAT IN THERE.
THANK YOU FOR THE LITTLE “DID YOU KNOW.” WE WILL GO TO THE PHONE LINES, LINE ONE, ROBIN HAS A QUESTION ABOUT TRANSPLANTING. HELLO, ROBIN?
>>CALLER: HI.
I HAVE A LITTLE TEENY, TINY PACK OF TRILLIUMS I HAVE BEEN NURSING ALONG FOR QUITE AWHILE.
>> GOOD.
>>ROSE BUSH IMPINGING ON THAT AREA HAS GONE, THANKS TO SPRINGFIELD CIVIC GARDENING CLUB.  NOW THERE IS ROOM TO SPREAD THEM OUT.
THEY ARE IN A REAL TIGHT CLUMP.
CAN I TRANSPLANT THEM NOW?
BECAUSE THEIR FLOWERS HAVEN’T PUT OUT THE THREE LITTLE DARK MAGENTA PETALS YET OR SHOULD I WAIT UNTIL AFTER THEY DIE OFF?
I GOT THE DAY LILIES GOT AHEAD OF ME.
I HAVE LEAVES UP, BUT NO BLOOM SPIKE.
CAN I TRANSPLANT THEM NOW OR DO I HAVE TO WAIT UNTIL AFTER THEY BLOOM?
>> OKAY, SO ON THE TRILLIUM, WE CAN TAKE A LITTLE POLL HERE.
I WOULDN’T TRANSPLANT THEM BEFORE THEY FLOWERED.
>>I THINK I WOULD WAIT UNTIL THEY START TO FADE.
ONCE THEY START TO FADE A LITTLE BIT, AFTER THEY HAVE, YOU KNOW, FULL FLOWERED AND START TO FADE, I THINK I WOULD MOVE THEM THEN AT THAT POINT.
I DON’T KNOW.
WHAT DO YOU GUYS THINK?
>> IF THING IS IN FLOWER, NOT REALLY A GOOD TIME TO PLANT.
>>IF IT IS ABOUT TO FLOWER, LET IT FLOWER.
>>IT WILL BE PUTTING A LOT OF ITS FOOD—INTERNAL FOOD UP INTO MAKING THAT FLOWER, AND YOU WANT IT TO BE AT A TIME WHEN IT PERHAPS IS MAKING ROOTS IF YOU ARE GOING TO TRANSPLANT WOULD BE MY THOUGHT.
>>I WOULD THINK YOU PROBABLY WANT, A LOT OF THOSE, THEY CAN FLOWER AND PUT ON SEED, AND IF SOME DON’T MAKE IT, YOU MOVE THEM AROUND, AT LEAST MAYBE YOU WILL HAVE THE SEED TO HELP SPREAD.
I WOULD WAIT UNTIL THEY START TO YELLOW A LITTLE BIT.
THEY DON’T HAVE TO BE COMPLETELY BROWNED OUT.
>>IF YOU HAVE THE TRANSPLANTING BUG, YOU COULD GET OUT AND TRANSPLANT A FEW OF THE WARM SEASON PERENNIAL GRASS.
IT WOULD BE WARM SEASON THAT ARE NOT UP YET.
>>RIGHT.
GRASSES ARE PRETTY FOR GIVING.
I WOULD TRANSPLANT OR TRANSPLANT GRASSES WHEN THEY ARE NOT FLOWERING.
>>A QUESTION ABOUT DAY LILIES?
>> WHAT WAS THAT QUESTION?
>> DAY LILIES, I MOVE ANY OLD TIME.
I CERTAINLY—DON’T YOU THINK?
I MOVED WHENEVER.
>>MAYBE NOT WHEN WE HAD FROST, 18-INCHES INTO THE SOIL.
MAYBE NOT ANY OLD TIME!
(LAUGHING).
>>JUST TO BE SPECIFIC.
BUT, NO, I DON’T THINK YOU CAN KILL A DAY LILY.
THANK YOU FOR YOUR TRANSPLANTING QUESTIONS.
WE ARE READY TO GO, AREN’T WE?
IT SOUNDS GOOD.
LET’S GO TO LINE TWO, AND I THINK IT IS A QUESTION ABOUT RHUBARB.
HI.
LINE TWO.
>>CALLER: HI.
IT IS ABOUT RHUBARB AND ABOUT MY GARDEN BECAUSE I HAVE USED VARIOUS FERTILIZERS AND PEATMOSS, AND I HAVE A COMBINATION SOIL THAT IS LIKE BLACK DIRT, SAND, HAS A LOT OF SAND.
I AM ON THE HIGH BANK OF A CREEK.
I HAVE TROUBLE BECAUSE SOME THINGS GROW VERY, VERY WELL, AND SOME THINGS DON’T GROW AT ALL.
THE RHUBARB I HAVE I TRIED FOR THREE YEARS TO GET RHUBARB STARTED, AND IT NEVER COMES BACK UP.
I JUST WONDERED IF THERE IS SOME PLACE I CAN SEND THE DIRT TO BE CHECKED AND SEE WHAT I NEED TO PUT ON THE GARDEN.
>>DO YOU KEEP PLANTING IT IN THE SAME SPOT OR DO YOU MOVE IT AROUND?
>>CALLER: NO, GARDEN IS PRETTY MUCH THE SAME SPOT.
BUT I PLANT THE THINGS I PLANT IN THERE IN DIFFERENT AREAS OF IT.
>>WELL, I WOULD THINK—WELL, FOR ONE THING, RHUBARB, ONLY THING I HAVE EVER SEEN OFF RHUBARB, IT IS ACTUALLY TOO WET.
IT WILL ROT.
I WOULDN’T THINK IN YOUR SOIL WITH ALL THE SAND AND STUFF THAT WOULD BE THE ISSUE.
PROBABLY WHAT I WOULD REALLY LOOK AT MAKE SURE WHEN YOU GET RHUBARB, IT IS TWO TO THREE YEAR OLD PLANT.
MAKE SURE IT IS A PRETTY GOOD SIZE ROOTS.
I DON’T KNOW HOW YOU ARE BUYING THEM, BUT MAYBE SURE IT IS PRETTY HEALTHY PLANT.
I HAVE SEEN PRETTY SMALL PLANTS, AND SOMETIMES TAKES THEM AWHILE TO GET GOING.
MAKE SURE IT IS NOT HAPPENS TO BE IN LOW SPOT WHERE IT MIGHT BE TOO WET BECAUSE THEY WILL NOT LIKE THAT AT ALL.
OTHER THAN THAT, AND FULL SUN.
THEY NEED FULL SUN.
EVEN A LITTLE SANDY SOIL WOULD BE FINE FOR THOSE.
YOU CAN CERTAINLY SEND SOIL SAMPLES OUT TO TESTING LABS. ANY AREA THAT DOES AGRICULTURAL SOIL TESTING GENERALLY WILL ALSO DO GARDEN SOIL TESTING.
JUST CHECKING YOUR.
>>THAT’S NOT SOMETHING THE UNIVERSITY DOES.
WE DO NOT DO SOIL TESTING.
PLENTY OF SOIL TESTING LABS OUT THERE.
CHECK WITH YOUR LOCAL EXTENSION OFFICE AND SEE IF THEY HAVE SOIL TESTING LABS THEY CAN MENTION TO YOU.
THAT WOULD PROBABLY BE THE BIG THING.
A BUNCH OF THINGS ACTUALLY LIKE SANDY SOIL.  I BOUGHT NATIVE PLANTS.
I WENT SHOPPING TODAY, OOPS, SORRY! BIRDS FOOT VIOLET. REALLY A GREAT LITTLE PLANT.
THERE IS LOTS OF THINGS ACTUALLY LIKE THAT KIND OF SANDIER SOIL.
BUTTERFLY WEED IS ANOTHER ONE THAT LOVES THE SANDIER SOIL.
PROBABLY THE BIG THING ALMOST SOUNDS LIKE YOU HAVE A LOT OF SHADE.
YOU SAID IT IS A RIVER BANK.  WOULD YOU HAVE A LOT OF SHADE?
>>CALLER: WELL, THERE IS SHADE ON THE EAST SIDE.
BUT ON THE SOUTH, NORTH AND WEST, NO.
>>FULL SUN.
OKAY.
YOU CAN CHOOSE YOUR SPOT.
>>CALLER: IN THE SUN, YES.
>>LOTS OF NATIVE PLANTS THAT ACTUALLY LIKE THAT KIND OF SANDIER SOIL.
YOU MAY TO LOOK AT DIFFERENT PLANT PALLET.
>>CALLER: OKAY.
>>THANK YOU VERY MUCH.
>>CALLER: DO YOU HAVE AN ADDRESS FOR SOIL TESTING?
>>IN YOUR AREA, JUST.
>>CALLER: IN IROQUOIS COUNTY.
>>JUST LOOK IT UP IN YOUR AREA.
>>SOIL TESTING.
WE CAN’T REALLY GIVE YOU.
>>CALLER: ON A COMPUTER?
>> NO, PHONE BOOK, SOIL TESTING.
BUT YOU CAN LOOK UP ON THE COMPUTER.
>>FARM BUREAU OFFICE OR EXTENSION OFFICE, AND THEY CAN GIVE YOU THE NEAREST ADDRESS AND CONTACT INFORMATION FOR THE NEAREST SOIL COMMERCIAL SOIL TESTING LAB.
>>CALLER: THANK YOU VERY MUCH.
I WILL TRY THAT.
>>OKAY.
THANK YOU SO MUCH.  WE WANT TO GO NEXT TO LINE THREE, AND THIS IS CAROL, AND SHE HAS A PERENNIAL GRASS QUESTION.
GOOD TYPING, CAROL.
>>CALLER: OKAY.
A COUPLE OF YEARS AGO, I BOUGHT TWO PERENNIAL GRASSES.
ONE I JUST STUCK IN THE GROUND, AND IT IS DOING FINE.
THE OTHER ONE BEFORE I PLANTED THEM, I SPLIT IT IN TWO, AND, YOU KNOW, DECORATIVELY PUT IT ON EITHER SIDE.
UNFORTUNATELY, THE ONE THAT I SPLIT IN TWO NEVER REALLY SEEMED TO TAKE.
I WENT OUT THERE NOW, AND, SURE ENOUGH, IT STILL DOESN’T SEEM TO HAVE TAKEN.
SHOULD I JUST GIVE UP THE GHOST, DIG UP THE CLUMPS AND THROW THEM OUT?
IS THERE ANY POSSIBILITY THAT THEY COULD START AGAIN AFTER TWO YEARS?
>> OH, NOT AFTER THE WEATHER WE HAD IN 2012.
MY GUESS IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE ANYTHING LAST YEAR, YOU WILL NOT HAVE ANYTHING THIS YEAR.
WHAT GRASS DID YOU PLANT?
CAN YOU TELL ME?
>>CALLER: I WAS AFRAID YOU WERE GOING TO ASK!
(LAUGHING).
>>TOM, YOU ARE SO MEAN!
>>THOMAS!
(LAUGHING).
>>I DO NOT KNOW.
I HAVE A CLUMP OF FLOWERS, ESTABLISHED, BUT IN ORDER TO TRANSPLANT THEM, YOU NEED TWO BOYS AND A STRONG MAN AND A CHAINSAW TO DIG UP THE ROOTS.
I WAS HOPING THIS WOULD WORK, BUT YOU THINK I SHOULD GIVE UP?
>> I WOULD SAY GRASSES ARE PRETTY FORGIVING, BUT IF YOU DIDN’T HAVE ANYTHING GROWING LAST YEAR, I WOULD BE PRETTY SEVEN THAT THEY ARE NOT ALIVE.
IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR ORNAMENTAL GRASSES, THERE ARE SOME REALLY NICE MISCANTHUS, SINENSIS OR VARIEGATED MISCANTHUS, OR PERISEDUM, I AM A PARTICULAR FAN OF KARLEY ROSE, ORIENTAL FOUNTAIN GRASS.
THAT’S A REAL NICE ONE AND DOESN’T SEEM TO BE INVASIVE.
HEARTY FOUNTAIN GRASSES WILL, IN FACT, INVADE YOUR LAWN.
THE SEEDS CAN GERMINATE.
KARLEY ROSE, I HAVEN’T THAT EXPERIENCE WITH THEM INVADING IN THE TURF.  IF YOU LOOK IN THOSE, KARL FOERSTER FEATHER REED.
IT TAKES URBAN SOILS, TAKES LIGHT SHADE.
DOESN’T MAKE VIABLE SEED.
DOESN’T SPREAD BY RHIZOMES.
OVER ALL, IT IS A REAL RELIABLE GRASS FOR THE LANDSCAPE.  YOU MIGHT CHOOSE FROM SOME OF THOSE AS YOU REPLACE THE TWO.
>>CALLER: THE TWO CLUMPS?
>> YES.
>>CALLER: THANK YOU.
I REALLY APPRECIATE IT.
>>FEATHER REED GRASS WOULD NOT TAKE TWO BOYS AND A MAN.
>>THE MISCANTHUS, CAN YOU BUY SIX INCH POT BY THE END OF THE GROWING SEASON, YOU WOULD HAVE A PRETTY RESPECTABLE LOOKING GRASS.
THEY GROW QUITE RAPIDLY.
>>ALL I TAKE IS A FAIRLY LONG SPADE AND DIVIDE A LITTLE BIT OFF THE SIDE.
I NEVER GET TWO BOYS AND A MAN.
>>OR ONE WOMAN.
>>AND A CHAINSAW!
(LAUGHING).
>>SORRY.
>>I TAKE A SPADE AND TAKE A LITTLE BIT OFF.
I AM GOING TO DO THAT HERE IN A COUPLE DAYS.
>>ABOUT TIME TO DO GRASS DIVIDING.
>>DON’T THINK YOU HAVE TO LIFT THE WHOLE THING.
JUST TAKE OFF WHAT YOU NEED.
>>WEDGE.
>>EXACTLY.
THAT’S WHAT I WANTED TO SAY, THANK YOU, THOMAS.
LET’S GO TO LINE FOUR, AND CAROLYN HAS A QUESTION FOR US ABOUT FLOWERS.
HI, CAROLYN.
OR IS IT CAROLINE?
>>CALLER: YES, I HAVE A QUESTION—I HAVE BEEN ENJOYING MY BEAUTIFUL TULIPS AND DAFFODILS.
>>GREAT.
>>CALLER: SOME OF THEM NEED TO BE DIVIDED.
I WAS WONDERING WHEN THE FLOWERS DIE, WOULD THAT BE A GOOD TIME TO DIVIDE THEM?
>>NOW THIS IS TULIPS AND DAFFODILS?
>>CALLER: YES.
I AM GOING TO RECOMMEND YOU WAIT UNTIL THE FOLIAGE RIPENS AND THAT MEANS YELLOW.
NOT AFTER WHEN IT DIES, BUT FOLIAGE YELLOWS.
YOU CAN STILL SEE FOLIAGE, BEFORE IT DISAPPEARS, OTHERWISE IT IS A TREASURE HUNT, YOU CAN DIG THEM, OR STORE THEM IN A GARAGE OR REPLANT THEM.
PUT A MARKER TO IDENTIFY THE SPOT THEY ARE IN, AND LATER IN THE FALL, YOU CAN—
>>SOUNDS LIKE SHE IS RARING TO!
(LAUGHING) YOU CAN DO EITHER ONE, BUT YOU WANT TO REMEMBER WHERE THEY ARE.
I FOLLOW THEM DOWN WITH THE YELLOW LEAVES.
>>CALLER: YES, THAT WILL WORK.
I WILL DO THAT.
THANK YOU VERY MUCH.
>>THANK YOU VERY MUCH.
IF YOU DO IT RIGHT AFTER IT FLOWERS, IT WILL BE.
>>THAT WILL BE THE END.
>>MINCE MEAT FOR NEXT YEAR.
>>WE WILL GO AROUND AND HAVE YOU DO A SHOW AND TELL, SANDY!
>>I WISH WE HAD “SMELLOVISION.”
BECAUSE WE ARE TALKING ABOUT FRAGRANCE IN THE GARDEN.
THERE IS ANY NUMBER OF PLANTS OUT THERE WITH FRAGRANCE TO IT.
WE CONSIDER THIS TO BE AN ANNUAL.
IT IS CALLED “STOCK.”
WHAT DO YOU THINK IT SMELLS LIKE?
>> SPICY.
>>SPICY.
VERY SPICY, ISN’T IT?
THIS WONDERFUL SPICY FRAGRANCE WHICH I JUST LOVE.
ALMOST LIKE A CLOVE. 
>>VERY CLOVE-LIKE, YES.
>>PEOPLE ARE FAMILIAR WITH HYACINTH WHICH IS A BULB WHICH YOU COULD PLANT IN THE FALL.
THIS TIME OF YEAR, YOU CAN BUY THEM LIKE THIS, ENJOY THE FLOWERS IN A CONTAINER AND PLANT THEM.
NO REASON YOU CAN’T PLANT THESE.
ONE OF THE OTHER THINGS IS LAVENDER.
THIS IS A SCRATCH AND SNIFF KIND OF PLANT.
>>OOOHH, AHHH.
>>THAT’S ONE THING, SOME FLOWERS EMIT THEIR FRAGRANCE, BUT THERE ARE A LOT LAVENDER OR HERBS, WHERE YOU HAVE TO PET THOSE, OR WHATEVER YOU WANT TO CALL THIS.
ENGLISH LAVENDER IS WINTER HARDY.
FRENCH HARDY SERRATED LEAVES, TENDS TO NOT BE HARDY.
KIND OF TEMPERAMENTAL, BUT QUITE FRAGRANT.
ENGLISH LAVENDER.
I FOUND IF YOU HAVE A HARD TIME THROUGH THE WINTER, IT IS GOOD TO HAVE SANDY SOILER A LOVELY CALLER SAID SHE HAD A SANDY SOIL, THE LAVENDER WOULD LIKE THAT BECAUSE IT LIKES WELL-DRAINED SOIL.
IT WOULD BE A GOOD THING FOR HER.
DON’T FORGET FRAGRANCE.
>>IF YOU CAN CONTROL WATER, YOU CAN ENJOY ANYTHING IN SANDY SOIL.
BUT IF YOU CAN MANAGE THE WATER AND FERTILITY, A LOT OF PLANTS WILL GROW IN SAND.
>>WELL, CERTAINLY.
NOW, SHE CAN HAVE LAVENDER.
>>THAT WOULD BE A GREAT COMBO.
>>THOSE EVEN LOOK NICE TOGETHER.
>>DON’T THEY?
>> GOOD COMBINATION OF COLORS.
THANK YOU FOR SMELLOVISION, FRAGRANCE, EVEN IF THE VIEWERS CAN’T SMELL IT.
>>I HAVE AN E-MAIL. HOW CAN I GET GRASS TO GROW IN OVER-SHADED AREAS? I LIVE IN URBANA AND THE TREES MAKE IT HARD FOR MY GRASS TO GROW.
UNFORTUNATELY, IT IS VERY DIFFICULT TO GROW HIGH QUALITY TURF IN THE SHADE.
I WOULD SUGGEST YOU TAKE A WALK OUT IN THE DENSE WOODS.
YOU DON’T SEE MANY GRASSES GROWING OUT THERE. GRASSES WE USE AS TURF GRASSES FOR THE MOST PART EVOLVED UNDER FULL SUN CONDITIONS.
IF YOU DO WANT TO TRY TO GROW GRASS IN THE SHADE, THE BEST GRASS FOR SHADED AREAS ARE THE FINE FESCUES.
I WOULD RECOMMEND CREEPING RED FESCUE OR CHEWING FESCUE.
THEY ARE THE MOST SHADE TOLERANT, PLANTED IN LATE SUMMER, EARLY FALL.
BEST TIME TO PLANT THEM.
KEEP THE LEAVES OFF AS IT IS DEVELOPING.
I KNOW PEOPLE WHO HAVE SHADE, AND PLANT FINE FESCUES EVERY FALL.
THEY HAVE GRASS IN THE SPRING UNTIL EARLY SUMMER, AND BY EARLY SUMMER, IT HAS GIVEN UP THE GHOST AGAIN BECAUSE IT IS TOO SHADY.
YOU MIGHT WANT TO THINK ABOUT MULCHES IN SOME OF THOSE AREAS OR WOODLAND WILD FLOWERS OR PACHYSANDRA OR ENGLISH IVY OR VINCA.
THERE IS ANY NUMBER OF REALLY ATTRACTIVE, I THINK SOME OF THE GINGERS ARE SPECTACULAR LOOK.
MAYBE IT IS A TIME TO DECIDE YOU WILL PUT YOUR EFFORTS INTO GROWING ATTRACTIVE GROUND COVER RATHER THAN TRYING TO HAVE TURF IN SHADE AREA.
SOMETIMES YOU JUST HAVE TO DO THAT.
YOU HAVE TO ADMIT THAT.
OKAY.
WELL, WE ARE GOING TO GO TO A ROSE QUESTION.
I FEEL LIKE ANSWERING A ROSE QUESTION.
LET’S GO TO LINE SIX, JANET WITH A ROSE QUESTION.
>>CALLER: YES.
I HAVE ROSES ALL ALONG SIDE OF MY HOUSE, AND I HAVE A FRIEND WHO IS IN THE GARDENING BUSINESS.
SHE SAID THAT ALL OF A SUDDEN THEY DEVELOPED THOUSANDS AND THOUSANDS OF THORNS.
SHE SAID IT HAS SOMETHING CALLED WITCHES BREW, AND THAT I NEEDED TO CUT THAT OUT OR IT WOULD SPREAD.
I CUT THAT ONE OUT, BUT IT SEEMS TO BE GOING TO ALL MY OTHER ROSES.
I DON’T KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH IT.
>>YEAH, IT ACTUALLY SOUNDS LIKE A DISEASE CALLED ROSE ROSETTE.
IT WILL CAUSE—WHAT YOU USUALLY SEE, THE ROSE LOOKS FINE AND ALL OF A SUDDEN THIS BRANCH WILL COME OUT AND HAVE RED THORNS, BRIGHT RED THORNS, AND LEAVES, AND COMPACT GROWTH.
IT LOOKS WEIRD.
IT LOOKS VERY DIFFERENT COMPARED TO THE REST OF IT.
>>CALLER: THOUSANDS.
>>ACTUALLY CAUSED BY—NOT QUITE A VIRUS, PHYTOPLASMA.
UNFORTUNATELY, NO WAY TO GET IT OUT OF THAT PLANT.
ONCE THE PLANT HAS IT, YOU HAVE TO GET IT OUT OF THERE.
YOU HAVE TO SACRIFICE THAT ONE PLANT BECAUSE INSECTS WILL TRANSFER THAT DISEASE TO YOUR OTHER ROSES.
THE PERSON THAT WAS TALKING TO YOU IS TOTALLY RIGHT ON BOARD THERE.
SO IT IS ONE OF THOSE THAT WE JUST UNFORTUNATELY HAVE TO SACRIFICE THAT PLANT THAT HAS THE DISEASE AND GET IT OUT OF THERE, BURY IT.
>>CALLER: CAN I PLANT NEW ROSES WHERE I TAKE THOSE OUT OF?
>> I WOULD BE A LITTLE BIT—
>>I WOULDN’T.
>>I WOULD BE LEERY OF THAT RIGHT NOW ESPECIALLY—BECAUSE IT COULD BE THE OTHER ROSES ALREADY HAVE IT, MAYBE IT IS NOT QUITE SHOWING UP YET.
I WOULD MAKE SURE YOU DIDN’T HAVE IT IN ANY OF THE OTHER ROSES, DON’T YOU THINK BEFORE YOU START ANY REPLANTING?
>> TO BE SAFE.
>>CALLER: ANYTHING I COULD SPRAY OR ANYTHING?
>> UNFORTUNATELY, IT IS SIMILAR IN THE REALM OF LIKE VIRUSES IN THE SENSE IT IS IN THE PLANT.
SO THERE REALLY IS NO WAY TO SORT OF GET IT OUT OF THE PLANT WITH ANY SPRAYS OR ANYTHING LIKE THAT.
>>CALLER: JUST TAKE THE WHOLE PLANT OUT.
>>TAKE THE WHOLE PLANT OUT.
>>I AM GOING TO HAVE TO BREAK IN.
THE SHOW IS OVER.
WOW.
THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR WATCHING.
IT GOES SO FAST.
I WANT TO THANK YOU FOLKS FOR BEING HERE.
>>SURE.
>>THANK YOU.
>>AND ALL OF YOU FOLKS.
HAVE A GREAT WEEK GARDENING.
SEE YOU NEXT TIME.
BYE-BYE.

 

Air Dates and Times

Channel Day Time
WILL-TV, Urbana Thursdays 7 pm (live)
  Saturdays 11 am (repeat)
WTVP-TV, Peoria Saturdays 10:30 am
WEIU-TV, Charleston Sundays 4:30 pm
WILL-AM/90.9 HD2 & HD3, Urbana Saturdays 6:30 am
WSEC-TV, Springfield Saturdays 11 am
WQEC-TV, Quincy Saturdays 11 am
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