A Taxonomy Of Trump Tweets

January 15, 2017
President-elect Donald Trump listens to a reporters question at Trump Tower in New York, Monday, Jan. 9, 2017.

President-elect Donald Trump listens to a reporters question at Trump Tower in New York, Monday, Jan. 9, 2017.

Evan Vucci / AP

As we all know, Donald Trump's tweets have become a potent force in our new era. On the one hand, a single tweet can cripple opponents, activate supporters, move markets, and subsume the news cycle. On the other, they're a window into Trump's wee-hours, unfiltered id.

But when his tweets are full of half-truths, distortions, and often bold-faced lies, should journalists treat them as normal presidential utterances, or something else?

Cognitive linguist George Lakoff believes that the press must understand how Trump uses language if we're to responsibly report on his tweets, not just magnify their misinformation. He talks with WNYC's Brooke Gladstone about the categories he's come up with for thinking about Trump tweets.

Story source: NPR