Classics of the Phonograph with John Frayne

WILL - Classics of the Phonograph with John Frayne - February 15, 2014

The Unknown Respighi

No composer writes only masterpieces. But Ottorino Respighi is a special case. A few of his works, like "Fountains of Rome," can be heard wherever classical music is played. But many of his compositions are rarely, if ever, played. So, if there is a problem, what is it? We'll play some of the "unknown Respighi."  


WILL - Classics of the Phonograph with John Frayne - February 08, 2014

String quartets of the early 20th century

In the early 20th century, the string quartet form was alive and well. Sibelius, who was famous for symphonies, wrote one entitled Intimate Voices, and Leon Janacek, famous for operas, wrote quartets with the titles, The Kreutzer Sonata, and Intimate Letters. We'll sample some of these quartets. 


WILL - Classics of the Phonograph with John Frayne - February 01, 2014

Romantic Period Recordings of Kurt Masur

German conductor Kurt Masur survived 26 years as the conductor of Communist East Germany's premiere orchestra, the Gewandhaus Orchestra of Leipzig. After 11 years of improving the playing of the New York Philharmonic, he was forced out in 2002. Masur made many records, and his specialty was music of the Romantic Period. We'll hear his distinctive way with Mendelssohn and Schumann.


WILL - Classics of the Phonograph with John Frayne - January 25, 2014

Recordings of Claudio Abbado

With the sad news of the passing of the great Italian conductor Claudio Abbado, I am changing the subject of this week's program. Over the past half century, Abbado has made outstanding recordings of a large range of repertory, from Mozart to Mahler, from Rossini to Verdi and beyond. We'll play a representative sampling of his recordings.


WILL - Classics of the Phonograph with John Frayne - January 18, 2014

Cathedral Recordings

Andrea Gabrieli and his nephew Giovanni were organists and music directors at the Cathedral of St. Mark in the days of Venice's glory, from the late 16th century to the early 17th century. They wrote multi-voiced compositions for the great cathedral in Venice, and over the past decades, performers have tried to record and duplicate the original sounds of their splendid pieces in the same cathedral or other locations. We'll hear some of these records. 


WILL - Classics of the Phonograph with John Frayne - January 11, 2014

Double and Triple Concertos

Concertos for multiple instruments were very popular in the 18th century. But in the 19th century, the solo concerto became dominant, because of the rise of superstar performers. Brahms successfully bucked the trend with his Concerto for Violin and Cello, but Beethoven had one of his few failures with his Triple Concerto. But our century has reversed that judgment. We'll hear from both these works.


WILL - Classics of the Phonograph with John Frayne - January 04, 2014

Early CDs of Seattle Symphony

One of the orchestras to emerge on the national scene during the early years of the CD was the Seattle Symphony Orchestra. With Gerard Schwartz as conductor, this orchestra on Delos CDs issued a number of outstanding performances, especially of American composers such as Howard Hanson. This orchestra and label showed yet once more the power of recordings in establishing a national, if not international, reputation. 


WILL - Classics of the Phonograph with John Frayne - December 28, 2013

Favorite Encores

Most performing musicians have a store of encores to play after the serious music of the concert or recital is over. A good encore is usually short, has immediate appeal, and most of the time a change of pace and mood from what has gone before. We'll play some of the favorite encores of famous violinists, from the days of Fritz Kreisler, to the today of Gil Shaham.


WILL - Classics of the Phonograph with John Frayne - December 21, 2013

Christmas Holiday Favorites

We'll hang the miseltoe for such medleys as Ralph Vaughan Williams' Fantasia on Christmas Carols and listen to the way that such conductors as Herbert von Karajan, Sir Thomas Beecham and Leopold Stokowski played holiday specialties.


WILL - Classics of the Phonograph with John Frayne - December 14, 2013

Recordings of Zubin Mehta

Conductor Zubin Mehta emerged as a rising star in the 1960s, and in the course of a highly successful career, he has held the podium for long periods of orchestras in Los Angeles, New York, and in Israel. Along the way, he has made many successful recordings. We'll hear highlights from his extensive discography. 


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