Media Matters


WILL - Media Matters - December 19, 2010

Truthdig columnist Chris Hedges

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(Duration: 57:37)

Chris Hedges, whose column is published Mondays on Truthdig, spent nearly two decades as a foreign correspondent in Central America, the Middle East, Africa and the Balkans. He has reported from more than 50 countries and has worked for The Christian Science Monitor, National Public Radio, The Dallas Morning News and The New York Times, for which he was a foreign correspondent for 15 years. 

www.truthdig.com


WILL - Media Matters - December 12, 2010

Andre Schiffrin, founder of The New Press

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(Duration: 57:32)

Andre Schiffrin has been a leading figure in the book publishing world for nearly 50 years. As head of Pantheon books Andre Schiffrin edited titles by Jean-Paul Sartre, Studs Terkel, Art Spiegelman, Noam Chomsky and Michel Foucault. In 1990 he resigned and set up the non-profit publishing house The New Press. Schiffrin has also written several of his own books.including A Political Education (Melville House), in which he examines socialist ideas in postwar America.

www.versobooks.com


WILL - Media Matters - December 05, 2010

Lisa Graves, Executive Director for The Center for Media and Democracy

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(Duration: 57:46)

Lisa Graves is the Executive Director of the Center for Media and Democracy, the publisher of PR Watch, SourceWatch, and BanksterUSA. She joined the Center in mid-2009. She previously served as a senior advisor in all three branches of the federal government, as a leading strategist on civil liberties advocacy, and as an adjunct professor (at George Washington University Law School). She has written articles for a number of publications and also served as Managing Editor of the Cornell Law Review. Call and join the conversation.

www.prwatch.org



WILL - Media Matters - November 21, 2010

Yochai Benkler, Berkman Professor of Entrepreneurial Legal Studies at Harvard

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(Duration: 59:44)

Yochai Benkler is the Berkman Professor of Entrepreneurial Legal Studies at Harvard, and faculty co-director of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society. Before joining the faculty at Harvard Law School, he was Joseph M. Field '55 Professor of Law at Yale. He writes about the Internet and the emergence of networked economy and society, as well as the organization of infrastructure, such as wireless communications. In the 1990s he played a role in characterizing the centrality of information commons to innovation, information production, and freedom in both its autonomy and democracy senses. In the 2000s, he worked more on the sources and economic and political significance of radically decentralized individual action and collaboration in the production of information, knowledge and culture. His work traverses a wide range of disciplines and sectors, and is taught in a variety of professional schools and academic departments. In real world applications, his work has been widely discussed in both the business sector and civil society. His books include The Wealth of Networks: How social production transforms markets and freedom (2006), which received the Don K. Price award from the American Political Science Association for best book on science, technology, and politics, the American Sociological Association's CITASA Book Award an outstanding book related to the sociology of communications or information technology, the Donald McGannon award for best book on social and ethical relevance in communications policy research, was named best business book about the future by Stategy & Business, and otherwise enjoyed the gentle breath of Fortuna. In civil society, Benkler's work was recognized by the Electronic Frontier Foundation's Pioneer Award in 2007, and the Public Knowledge IP3 Award in 2006. His articles include Overcoming Agoraphobia (1997/98, initiating the debate over spectrum commons); Commons as Neglected Factor of Information Production (1998) and Free as the Air to Common Use (1998, characterizing the role of the commons in information production and its relation to freedom); From Consumers to Users (2000, characterizing the need to preserve commons as a core policy goal, across all layers of the information environment); Coase's Penguin, or Linux and the Nature of the Firm (characterizing peer production as a basic phenomenon of the networked economy) and Sharing Nicely (2002, characterizing shareable goods and explaining sharing of material resources online). His work can be freely accessed at benkler.org.



WILL - Media Matters - November 07, 2010

Paul Jay of The Real News

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(Duration: 58:12)

Paul Jay is the CEO and Senior Editor of The Real News Network. 9/11 and the Iraq war were turning points in history and it had an irreversible effect in Paul Jay's life. Alarmed by the inability of major media to ask the underlying questions, Paul decided to combine his film and television experience and his quest to know the undercurrents of news to build an independent television network. Three years later IWT - The Real News is on it's way. Paul is an internationally acclaimed, award winning filmmaker whose films include Return To Kandahar, Hitman Hart: Wrestling with Shadows, Lost in Las Vegas, and Never-Endum-Referendum. Paul was the Executive Producer of counterSpin - Canada's flagship debate show on CBC Newsworld, for a decade. He was also the Founding Chair of the Hot Docs International Festival (Toronto), now the largest in North America. www.therealnews.com


WILL - Media Matters - October 31, 2010

Juan Gonzalez from Democracy Now!

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(Duration: 58:37)

Juan Gonzalez has been a professional journalist for more than 30 years and a staff columnist at the New York Daily News since 1987. A recipient of the 1998 George Polk Award for commentary, Gonzalez was the first reporter in New York City to consistently expose the health effects arising from the September 11, 2001 attacks and the cover-up of these hazards by government officials. He is a founder and past president of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, and a member of NAHJ's Hall of Fame. During his term as NAHJ president, Gonzalez created the Parity Project, an innovative program that creates partnerships between local communities and media organizations to improve coverage of the Latino community and to recruit and retain more Hispanic journalists. He also spearheaded a successful movement among U.S. journalists to join other citizen groups in opposing the Federal Communications Commission's deregulation of media ownership restrictions.



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