Dallas Police Chief Says Shooting Suspect Was Upset Over Police Shootings

July 08, 2016
Dallas police detain a driver after several police officers were shot in downtown Dallas, Thursday, July 7, 2016. Snipers apparently shot police officers during protests and some of the officers are dead, the city's police chief said in a statem

Dallas police detain a driver after several police officers were shot in downtown Dallas, Thursday, July 7, 2016. Snipers apparently shot police officers during protests and some of the officers are dead, the city's police chief said in a statement.

LM Otero/Associated Press

Dallas Police Chief David Brown says a suspect in the overnight attack that killed five police officers, wounded seven others and wounded two civilians said he was upset over the recent police shootings of black men and wanted to kill white people.  Friday morning, federal officials told NPR that the gunman who died in the parking garage was named Micah Xavier Johnson.

Brown said at a news conference Friday that the suspect made the comments before he was killed by an explosive used by police.  

He says his department and their families are grieving and that the divisiveness between police and the public must stop.  

Authorities say snipers opened fire on police officers during a peaceful protest in downtown Dallas Thursday night over the recent fatal shootings of black men in Louisiana and Minnesota.  

Authorities say three other suspects were arrested.  

Meanwhile, Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner says the attack on police officers in Dallas is "outrageous'' and that police "deserve our respect and support.''  

In a statement Friday, the governor says the fatal shootings by police of black men in Minnesota in Louisiana that led to the protests also are "deeply distressing.''  

Rauner says the events speak to a lack of unity and trust in many communities and "underscores the urgency in addressing that lack of trust.''  

U.S. Rep. John Shimkus (R-IL-15) said in a statement that he was "saddened and outraged" by this week's shootings, and "I mourn with the families of all who have died."

"We must bring hope to our struggling cities and communities while protecting and supporting our law enforcement," said Shimkus. "Today is the time to weep, but tomorrow it's time to get to work bringing our country back together."

(This story was updated at 9:17 AM 7/8/16).

Story source: AP