The 21st Show

Reckoning with the internment of Japanese-Americans in World War II

 
This March 23, 1942, photo shows the first arrivals at the Japanese evacuee community established in Owens Valley in Manzanar, Calif.

This March 23, 1942, photo shows the first arrivals at the Japanese evacuee community established in Owens Valley in Manzanar, Calif.

After decades of silence, Japanese-Americans who had been imprisoned during World War II, and their descendants, spoke up in the Redress Movement of the 1980s, and it's been seen as a model for other communities seeking justice and healing today for wrongs committed by the US government. Japanese-Americans who relocated to the Midwest played a big part in getting justice so many years later, and a new online multimedia exhibit explores their experiences. It’s called ‘Reckoning.’ This project is part of a collaborative grant initiative undertaken by the Japanese-American Service Committee and the Chicago Japanese-American Historical Society. We were joined by the project's creator, the president of the Chicago chapter of the Japanese-American Citizen's League, and the Japanese-American Service Committee's Legacy Center Director.

GUESTS:

Lisa Doi

President of the Chicago chapter of the Japanese American Citizen's League | PhD student in American Studies at Indiana University 

Katherine (Kat) Nagasawa 

Writer and Producer of Reckoning 

Emma Saito Lincoln

Legacy Center Director, JASC (Japanese American Service Committee)

 

 

Prepared for web by Owen Henderson

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