(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

WILL

Sen. Tammy Duckworth; Mosque Bombing Suspects; McDonald’s Franchisees; Holiday Video And Board Games

On the 21st: McDonald’s franchise owners are nervous about whether they can still make money and they’re not happy with corporate leaders, either. Plus, if you’re still shopping for the holidays, we’ll give you some board game and video game suggestions. Also, three central Illinois men are appearing in court this week for trying to blow up a mosque in Minnesota. And as Minnesota Public Radio’s Matt Sepic tells us they’re now in trouble for a lot more than that. But first, it’s been another hectic week in Washington. And with the possibility of another government shutdown next week, we check in with Illinois Senator Tammy Duckworth.

Randy von Liski/Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

December 10, 2018

IL SCOTUS Pension Ruling; More Out Of State Abortions Happening In IL; Illinois’ First Dark Sky Park

On The 21st: Last year more than 5,500 women came to Illinois to have abortions—about 1,000 more than the year before. Plus, astronomy fans got some good news, as Champaign County. now has the state’s first dark sky park. But first, the Illinois Supreme Court has struck down a law that was designed to limit union leaders from paying themselves disproportionately high pensions.


Alex Coleman/Illinois Newsroom

December 06, 2018

Marijuana Legalization: A Community Conversation; Rookie Mag Ends; Science And Ethics Behind CRISPR

On The 21st: Ten states and Washington D.C. have legalized recreational marijuana. Is Illinois next in line? We’ll dive into what’s next if the legislature takes up the issue next year. And after seven years, the publication Rookie Mag has come to an end. How is it being remembered? But first, last month a scientist in China said that he used a gene-editing technique called CRISPR on two babies and that those babies have already been born. We check in with U of I’s Rachel Whitaker on what CRISPR is, and why so many scientists are upset about how it was used.


Source: University of Illinois Archives

December 05, 2018

How U of I Wound Up In Champaign; International Student Enrollment; Open Enrollment and ACA Update

On the 21st: The number of new international college students in the US has decreased for the second straight year. Some worry that it’s because of our political climate, but some experts believe it's just part of the picture. We heard more about that. Plus, open enrollment for the healthcare marketplace goes on until December 15. We spoke to some experts to help you understand that, and what’s going on with the Affordable Care Act. And, a man named Clark Robinson Griggs played a huge part in making sure U of I would call Champaign-Urbana home. So why has he been largely written out of our history?


AP/ Michelle R. Smith

December 04, 2018

2020 Census Impact on IL; 23,000 Duplicate Vehicle Tickets Dismissed; Central Illinois Tornadoes

On The 21st: A new development on the story of unpaid debt from parking tickets, which, it turns out, disproportionately affected communities of color in Chicago. After ProPublica investigated the issue, the city is now dismissing about 23,000 tickets. Plus, dozens of people have been injured in that town after it was hit by a tornado this past weekend. We’ll get an update from local officials on the ground. But first, a number of states are suing the federal government to keep the citizenship question off the 2020 census. We’ll talk about what’s at stake for Illinois in the next census.


Wikimedia Commons

December 03, 2018

Illinois Turns 200: Our First Constitution; VOICES Act; Underground Railroad History; IL Movies

On the 21st: On this day 200 years ago, Illinois became the 21st state to join the union (yes, that's where our show's name comes from). We're bringing you an hour of our favorite bicentennial conversations from this past year—everything from our first state constitution, to the best Illinois movies, to the little-known history of free black communities in southernmost Illinois. Plus, we'll check in with immigration advocates about the 'VOICES Act,' which will become law next year.


nicdalic/flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

November 29, 2018

Drinking Water In Illinois; ‘No Blue Memories’ Gwendolyn Brooks Production; Day With(out) Art Film

On The 21st: Who’s in charge of telling you when your tap water isn’t safe? We talk to experts about an incident in Champaign last week. Plus we discuss how one Chicago cinema troupe is using puppets, music and overhead projectors to tell the story of poet Gwendolyn Brooks’s life. Plus, as World AIDS day approaches, we learn about a new film that gets its Illinois premiere this weekend.


Ryan Denham/WGLT

November 28, 2018

Rivian At The LA Auto Show; Technology In The Classroom; Midwest Climate Change

On the 21st: Bloomington-Normal residents have wondered what Rivian will do ever since the company first moved to the area. And recently, the startup unveiled their plans to make electric pickup trucks. We’ll learn more about that and the state of the auto industry in the Midwest. Plus, students of all ages are using more technology in the classrooms than ever before, whether it’s laptops, tablets, or other devices. So how do teachers make sure that technology is helpful instead of distracting? But first, we’ll sit down with state climatologist Jim Angel to talk climate change in Illinois.


Sebastián Hidalgo/WBEZ

November 27, 2018

Dolton, IL and Suburban Poverty; More Scientists In Congress; Starved Rock Expansion; E-Cigarettes

On The 21st: There’s been growing poverty in American suburbs for years. WBEZ and the Better Government Association have spent months talking to people in one of these communities - Dolton, Illinois. Plus, the next Congress will have seven new members with science backgrounds. We talk with current Representative Bill Foster and Congressman-elect Sean Casten about what this could mean for the next few years. Plus, Starved Rock and Matthiessen State Parks are expanding by more than 2,600 acres. What could that mean for visitors and for the land itself? And, with e-cigarette sales going up, what do we know about their health effects? 


(AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)

November 26, 2018

Increasing Student Loan Debt; Giving Tuesday; Illinois Veto Session

On the 21st: Nearly 45 million Americans have student debt, and together and they owe nearly $1.5 trillion. Some experts say this problem could become as big as the last housing crisis if we don’t take action now. Plus, it’s holiday shopping season but tomorrow is also Giving Tuesday. Today we discuss what you need to know in order to donate responsibly to your favorite charities. And, this month the General Assembly is gathering for the last veto session of Governor Rauner’s first and only term. We heard from WTTW’s Amanda Vinicky on which bills could become law.


AP/Josh Reynolds

November 21, 2018

Holiday Retail Check-in; Coming Together Over Interfaith Thanksgiving; Tech Support for the Holidays

On the 21st: Tomorrow, many of us will be celebrating Thanksgiving with our families, but it can also be a time to come together across different faiths. And, with lots of generations gathered together under one roof how can you help those who aren’t as tech savvy? But first, with Black Friday fast approaching and Christmas around the corner, it’s the time of the year when people shop... A lot. But how's retail actually doing in many places? We checked in on how holiday retail is doing.


Courtesy of Lethe Press Books and UIC

November 20, 2018

New Anthology Explores Recovering from Trauma; Holiday Mental Health; Podcasts for the Holidays

On the 21st: Today we talked about the new anthology, Survivor, and how stories of science fiction or magic can help us recover from traumatic or challenging events. Plus, whether you're going to visit family or headed away on vacation, it’s the time of year when a lot of us will be on the road or on a plane. We talked about some of our favorite podcasts to help you pass the time. But first, the holiday’s can be a wonderful time to get together with family and friends. Although it can also be stressful. We spoke with two therapists about how to maintain good mental health this holiday season.


Chris Dodson/Flickr

November 19, 2018

Tips for Winter Driving; Holiday Travel Update; Native American Food Systems

On the 21st: It's officially the dreaded holiday travel season. In Illinois, that means it’s cold outside, and it’s busy out on the roads and in airports. Today, we run down some tips for people driving out in the snow and getting your car ready if you’re hitting the road. Plus, we’ll get the latest in travel news with NPR’s David Schaper. But first, farming has always been part of American life. But Native American communities have to do more with a lot less land. They’re also worried about how the government’s food policies will affect them.


Niki Davis/Rooted in Food

November 15, 2018

A Thanksgiving Special: Cooking Tips and Tricks, Local Farm Products, And Family Food Traditions

On The 21st: Thanksgiving is officially a week away! On this special episode of The 21st, we speak with food writer Niki Davis about some of her favorite recipes and farmers throughout the state will tell us what they’re growing. Plus, we dive into some family traditions and memories that go far beyond the usual turkey and stuffing. 


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