The 21st Show

Women’s Vaccine Side Effects

 
a nurse fills a syringe with a dose of the Johnson & Johnson's one-dose COVID-19 vaccine at the Vaxmobile, at the Uniondale Hempstead Senior Center, in Uniondale, N.Y. New Yorkers over 16 years old can sign up for COVID-19 vaccinations starting Tuesday, April 6 a major expansion of eligibility as the state seeks to immunize as many people as possible.

a nurse fills a syringe with a dose of the Johnson & Johnson's one-dose COVID-19 vaccine at the Vaxmobile, at the Uniondale Hempstead Senior Center, in Uniondale, N.Y. New Yorkers over 16 years old can sign up for COVID-19 vaccinations starting Tuesday, April 6 a major expansion of eligibility as the state seeks to immunize as many people as possible. AP Photo/Mary Altaffer

The COVID-19 vaccines dramatically reduce the risk of ending up in the hospital or dying of the virus, but some minor side effects are to be expected. Those could include fatigue, fever, chills or a very sore arm. However, there are other side effects being reported that were overlooked or not asked about in clinical trials for the shots — particularly side effects for women. Some people who menstruate have been reporting their cycles temporarily changed after receiving the vaccine, and have been sharing their experiences on social media. 

Guests:

Kate Clancy, Associate Professor at the University of Illinois 

Katharine Lee, Postdoctoral research fellow, Public Health Sciences, Washington University St. Louis

Tara Haelle, Science and Health Journalist, Author of Vaccination Investigation: The History and Science of Vaccines

 

Prepared for web by Zainab Qureshi

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