Changes to ‘No Child Left Behind’

April 13, 2015
 
President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the ESEA in 1965 with Kate Deadrich Loney, his first schoolteacher.

President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the ESEA in 1965 with Kate Deadrich Loney, his first schoolteacher.

Yoichi Okamoto/LBJ Presidential Library

On April 14, a bipartisan group of senators on the HELP committee began hashing out the details of a proposed rewrite to the massive education law known as No Child Left Behind. The law, itself a reauthorization of the landmark Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, was supposed to have been revised back in 2007.

Congress has been unable to find common ground on a major revision since NCLB technically expired in 2007.

NPR's education desk says public school teachers may like this major revision of President George W. Bush's signature education law, passed in 2001. The proposed changes would let states — not Washington — decide how to evaluate their teachers and fix struggling schools.

Get more information about the proposed changes here.