ENCORE: Lake Michigan Warming; Writer Parker Palmer

July 30, 2019
 
A woman jumps into the shallow water of Lake Michigan as her companion takes her picture at Chicago's Oak Street Beach, Thursday, June 20, 2019.

A woman jumps into the shallow water of Lake Michigan as her companion takes her picture at Chicago's Oak Street Beach, Thursday, June 20, 2019.

Amr Alfiky/AP

The Great Lakes are warming. Although it might make for better swimming, higher temperatures could have a disastrous effect on Lake Michigan’s game fish, like trout and salmon, which depend on cold water. Plus, we revisit a conversation with writer and educator Parker Palmer. His most recent book is called On The Brink Of Everything: Grace, Gravity and Getting Old.

If you’ve ever been swimming in one of the Great Lakes here in the Midwest, you know they all have one thing in common - being frigid! Even on the warmest summer day in Chicago, the water remains… refreshing, shall we say. 

But a report from researchers at Purdue University found that the Great Lakes are warming. Although it might make for better swimming, higher temperatures could have a disastrous effect on Lake Michigan’s game fish, like trout and salmon, which depend on cold water. 

To learn more about this report, we heard from Paris Collingsworth, a research professor in the Department of Forestry and Natural Resources at Purdue University and the Great Lakes Ecosystem Specialist for Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant, as well as Karen Murchie, a research biologist at the Shedd Aquarium. 

Plus--

Parker Palmer writes about many of the big things in life: from our vocations to civic discourse. He’s a community organizer and founder of the Center for Courage and Renewal. At the heart of everything, though, he’s an educator. And his latest book is meant to teach us a different way about how we think about aging.

The collection of essays is called On the Brink of Everything: Grace, Gravity & Getting Old. 

Last summer, we caught up with Parker from his home in Madison, Wisconsin.