Meal Makeover Moms/Flickr (CC BY-ND 2.0)

The 21st Show - February 11, 2019

Summer Food Programs; Southern Illinois Prohibition Army; Passive Houses; Food Bank Check-in

On The 21st: Nearly a hundred years ago, the 18th amendment to the US constitution banned liquor. During that time, some anti-liquor advocates teamed up with the KKK to target Italian and French immigrants. Plus, 'Passive houses' are insulated eco-friendly homes which need almost no heat or air conditioning, and in the U.S., they started in Urbana. We also speak with the Rock River Valley Pantry about how the freezing weather affects people who need their services. But first, every day, 30 million students across the country get their lunch at school. But what happens when the school year ends? 

The first African American marines are at risk of losing their Montford Point Marines Association this year.

Manuel Martinez/WBEZ

The 21st Show - February 07, 2019

First Black Marines at Risk of Losing Veterans Center; Fighting for a Cure to ALS

On The 21st: In the 1940s, the Montford Point Marines fought in World War II and were the first African-American marines. Today, some of those veterans live in Chicago, and for decades they’ve relied on a local veterans center that’s now at risk of closing. Plus, Chicagoan Brian Wallach was diagnosed with ALS more than a year ago, and he’s spending his time trying to raise 100 million dollars to help find a cure for future generations.

Former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich and wife Patti, in 2012.

M. Spencer Green/AP

The 21st Show - February 06, 2019

The Rise And Fall Of Gov. Blagojevich; Speaker Madigan Gives Deposition; Scientist Victor Bahl

On the 21st: Eight years ago, Rod Blagojevich was sent to federal prison. Now, WBEZ is tackling the rise and fall of our state’s 40th governor in a podcast called Public Official A. Also, Illinois’ House Speaker Mike Madigan is being sued by a political opponent who says the Speaker put sham candidates on the ballot. We unpack this story with the Chicago Tribune’s Ray Long. Plus, the internet of today is massive, complicated, and, as researcher Victor Bahl says, almost taken for granted. We speak with Bahl as he gets ready at a research conference for U of I students. 

Jemeatris Rimkus

The 21st Show - February 05, 2019

The Story Of St. Elmo Brady; Young Evangelicals And Climate Change; ‘Minding The Gap’ Documentary

On the 21st: St. Elmo Brady got a scholarship to go to the University of Illinois in 1912—and four years later, he became the first African-American to earn a Ph.D in Chemistry. Plus, we revisit our conversation about how young evangelical Christians are hoping to move the needle on climate change. And, our interview with Illinois filmmaker Bing Liu, whose Rockford documentary 'Minding The Gap' has been nominated for an Academy Award.

Chris Potter/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

The 21st Show - February 04, 2019

Preparing Your Taxes This Year; New ‘Parent Lab’ Tutoring; Gov. Pritzker’s Executive Orders

On The 21st: 2017 saw some sizable federal tax code changes. This coming tax season will be the first since it’s taken effect, so what can Illinois taxpayers expect and prepare? Plus, most parents out there know how hard it can be to help children with their homework. A new program in Champaign called the 'Parent Lab” is helping tutor parents so that they have the right tools. Also, Governor Pritzker has signed eight executive orders since his term began three weeks ago. We’ll break down what’s new and what these orders say about Pritzker’s administration. 

Krannert Center for the Performing Arts

The 21st Show - January 31, 2019

‘Hit The Wall’ Play Tackles Stonewall Riots; Asian American Politics; Pet Obesity

On the 21st: The Stonewall Inn is home to one of the most important moments in LGBT history. The 1969 riots are the subject of a play at the Krannert Center For Performing Arts called Hit The Wall. Plus, is your pet stuck at home in this bitter cold? Just like humans, pets are vulnerable to weight gain and obesity. What can you do to keep your animals healthy, and what can we learn about our own health from our pets? And, the label “Asian-American” has only been around since the late sixties when it started being used by civil rights activists. So today, where do Asian-Americans stand in our country’s ideas about race and identity?

Atiba Flemons, provided through his attorney

The 21st Show - January 30, 2019

U of I Sued By Black Employees; Sickle-Cell Gene Editing; The History Of Illinois’ Sundown Towns

On The 21st: A group of black employees have filed a class action lawsuit against the University of Illinois. They say they face regular racial harassment while on the job. And, for tens of thousands of Americans, living with sickle-cell disease can be excruciatingly painful and even deadly. Now, new gene therapy advancements have given a handful of patients hope for a symptom free life, and even a cure. Plus, have you seen the movie Green Book? It talks about sundown towns in the South, but it’s something that was actually a bigger issue for black citizens in Illinois. 

(AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

The 21st Show - January 29, 2019

Preparing For Cold Weather; Juvenile Life Sentences; Mosque Bombing Pleas; Antibiotic Overuse

On The 21st: Illinois is facing sub-zero temperatures for the next couple of days. How do administrators decide whether or not to close school? Plus, the Illinois Supreme Court is hearing a case today that asks: how long is too long when it comes to sentencing juvenile offenders? Also, two men from central Illinois pleaded guilty in Minnesota federal court last week for trying to bomb a mosque in August of 2017. And, a new study shows more than 80 percent of the time we’re prescribed antibiotics we don’t actually need it.

(AP Photo/John O'Connor)

The 21st Show - January 28, 2019

The Damage From The Shutdown; How Illinois Became So Segregated; Cold Weather Update

On The 21st: Illinois is home to some of America’s most segregated cities. Not just Chicago, but also Peoria, Rockford, and Springfield. Plus, have you checked this week’s forecast? Lots of us are going to see below zero temperatures. Meteorologist Andrew Pritchard helps us prepare. But first, the government is finally open after the longest shutdown in American history. And the state of Illinois wants to fund a hundred million dollars in low or zero-interest loans to people who’ve been affected. 

Lieutenant Governor Stratton at Inauguration

Vishesh Anand/Illinois Public Media

The 21st Show - January 24, 2019

Lt. Gov. Stratton And Criminal Justice; Male Preschool Teachers; World’s Fair Vase Found

On the 21st: We speak with Juliana Stratton, our new lieutenant governor. She’s tasked with leading the state’s efforts to change our criminal justice syste - and, we'll hear from the community organization First Followers on how to best help people who have been incarcerated. Plus, just 2% of Illinois preschool teachers are men. What's behind that? And, you might be surprised to hear that the 8-foot tall “lost vase” from the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair has been found...in a California seafood restaurant.

J.B. Pritzker speaks with campaign supporters in Springfield in this 2017 file photo.

Brian Mackey/NPR Illinois

The 21st Show - January 23, 2019

Governor Pritzker’s Stance On Marijuana; Beating The Winter Blues; Rusty Patch Bumblebees

On The 21st: When it comes to legalizing recreational marijuana, Governor JB Pritzker has made his stance pretty clear, but the legalization process can be complicated. We answer your questions about what Illinois might do about this. Plus, we have some tips for warding off the winter blues. Also, it’s gotten so bad for one particular endangered bee species that the NRDC is suing the federal government.

Juhamanninen/Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0)

The 21st Show - January 22, 2019

What Educators Want From Gov. Pritzker; IL Video Gambling; How Shutdown Affects Crisis Hotlines

On The 21st: Video gambling machines were meant to bring in money for the state, but as a ProPublica Illinois investigation found, it’s actually created both financial and social costs. Plus, the government shutdown has started to hurt crisis center hotlines for sexual violence. We’ll hear from the Illinois Coalition Against Sexual Assault on how they’re trying to keep things running. But first, what should Governor Pritzker do about our education system? We talk with educators about what they hope to see from our state government.

From the book New Philadelphia used with the permission of the McWorter family.

The 21st Show - January 21, 2019

The First Town Founded By African-Americans; Building Trust Between Police And Civilians

On the 21st: As we celebrate Martin Luther King Jr. Day, we look to Illinois' past and present. First, Yale law professor and central Illinois native Tracey Meares tells us what it takes to build a sense of fairness between police and civilians. Plus, the story of New Philadelphia, Illinois—the first town founded by African-Americans—told by Kate Williams-McWorter and Gerald McWorter, who also happens to be great-great-grandson of the town's founder.

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